Joyce Quotes

Quotes tagged as "joyce" (showing 1-30 of 34)
James Joyce
“And if he had judged her harshly? If her life were a simple rosary of hours, her life simple and strange as a bird's life, gay in the morning, restless all day, tired at sundown? Her heart simple and willful as a bird's heart?”
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

James Joyce
“There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present.”
James Joyce

James Joyce
“Shite and onions!”
James Joyce, Ulysses

Anthony M. Esolen
“The worst feature of the Common Core is its anti-humanistic, utilitarian approach to education. It mistakes what a child is and what a human being is for. That is why it has no use for poetry, and why it boils the study of literature down to the scrambling up of some marketable "skill" [...] you don't read good books to learn about what literary artists do...you learn about literary art so that you can read more good books and learn more from them. It is as if Thomas Gradgrind had gotten hold of the humanities and turned them into factory robotics.”
Anthony M. Esolen

Stephen Fry
“It may be that The Great Gatsby is as perfect, word for word, just in terms of English; but Ulysses is deeper, richer, wider – and is comic, whereas The Great Gatsby is a tragic novel. And I think all great art is comic art.

(video)”
Stephen Fry

Virginia Woolf
“My great adventure is really Proust. Well-- what remains to be written after that? I’m only in the first volume, and there are, I suppose, faults to be found, but I am in a state of amazement; as if a miracle were being done before my eyes. How, at last, has someone solidified what has always escaped--and made it too into this beautiful and perfectly enduring substance? One has to put the book down and gasp. The pleasure becomes physical--like sun and wine and grapes and perfect serenity and intense vitality combined. Far otherwise is it with Ulysses; to which I bind myself like a martyr to a stake, and have thank God, now finished-- My martyrdom is over. I hope to sell it for £4.10.”
Virginia Woolf, The Letters of Virginia Woolf: Volume Two, 1912-1922

Nicole Krauss
“I, too, like to read. Once a month, I go to the local branch. For myself, I pick a novel and, for Bruno, with his cataracts, a book on tape. At first Bruno was doubtful. “What am I supposed to do with this?” he said, looking at the box set of “Anna Karenina” as if I’d handed him an enema. And yet. A day or two later I was going about my business when a voice from above bellowed, ALL HAPPY FAMILIES RESEMBLE ONE ANOTHER, nearly giving me a conniption. After that, he listened to whatever I’d brought him at top volume and then returned it to me without comment. One afternoon, I came back from the library with Ulysses. For a month straight he listened. He had a habit of pressing the stop button and rewinding when he hadn’t fully grasped something. INELUCTABLE MODALITY OF THE VISIBLE: AT LEAST THAT. Pause, rewind. INELUCTABLE MODALITY OF THE. Pause, rewind. INELUCTABLE MODALITY. Pause. INELUCT.”
Nicole Krauss

James Joyce
“He laughed to free his mind from his minds bondage.”
James Joyce, Ulysses

“Now, in all that he has done, Amos Tutuola is not sui generis. Is he ungrammatical? Yes. But James Joyce is more ungrammatical than Tutuola. Ezekiel Mphahlele has often said and written that African writers are doing violence to English. Violence? Has Joyce not done more violence to the English Language? Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn is written in seven dialects, he tells us. It is acknowledged a classic. We accept it, forget that it has no "grammar", and go ahead to learn his "grammar" and what he has to tell us. Let Tutuola write "no grammar" and the hyenas and jackals whine and growl. Let Gabriel Okara write a "no grammar" Okolo. They are mum. Why? Education drives out of the mind superstition, daydreaming, building of castles in the air, cultivation of yarns, and replaces them with a rational practical mind, almost devoid of imagination. Some of these minds having failed to write imaginative stories, turn to that aristocratic type of criticism which magnifies trivialities beyond their real size. They fail to touch other virtues in a work because they do not have the imagination to perceive these mysteries. Art is arbitrary. Anybody can begin his own style. Having begun it arbitrarily, if he persists to produce in that particular mode, he can enlarge and elevate it to something permanent, to something other artists will come to learn and copy, to something the critics will catch up with and appreciate.”
Taban Lo Liyong

James Joyce
“Anna was, Livia is, Plurabelle's to be. Northmen's thing made southfolk's place but howmulty plurators made eachone in per-son? Latin me that, my trinity scholard, out of eure sanscreed into
oure eryan! Hircus Civis Eblanensis! He had buckgoat paps on him, soft ones for orphans. Ho, Lord! Twins of his bosom. Lord save us! And ho! Hey? What all men. Hot? His tittering daugh-ters of. Whawk?
Can't hear with the waters of. The chittering waters of. Flitter-ing bats, fieldmice bawk talk. Ho! Are you not gone ahome?
What Thom Malone? Can't hear with bawk of bats, all thim liffey-ing waters of. Ho, talk save us! My foos won't moos. I feel as old as yonder elm. A tale told of Shaun or Shem? All Livia's daughter-
sons. Dark hawks hear us. Night! Night! My ho head halls. I feel as heavy as yonder stone. Tell me of John or Shaun? Who wereShem and Shaun the living sons or daughters of? Night now!
Tell me, tell me, tell me, elm! Night night! Telmetale of stem or stone. Beside the rivering waters of, hitherandthithering waters of. Night!”
James Joyce, Finnegans Wake

“But my considered opinion, after long reflection, is that, whilst in many places the effect of "Ulysses" on the reader undoubtedly is somewhat emetic, nowhere does it tend to be an aphrodisiac.”
John Munro Woolsey, United States v. One Book Called "Ulysses"

James Joyce
“I smiled at him. America, I said quietly, just like that. What is it? The sweepings of every country including our own. Isn't that true? That's a fact.”
James Joyce

Declan Kiberd
“A man [Joyce] whose earliest stories appeared next to the manure prices in the Irish Homestead knew that columns of prose, like columns of shit, could both recultivate the earth.”
Declan Kiberd, Ulysses And Us: The Art Of Everyday Living

“In respect of the recurrent emergence of the theme of sex in the minds of [Joyce's] characters, it must always be remembered that his locale was Celtic and his season spring.”
John Munro Woolsey, United States v. One Book Called "Ulysses"

George Steiner
“No cabe duda de que el contraataque más exuberante lanzado por escritor alguno contra la reducción del lenguaje es el de James Joyce. Después de Shakespeare y de Burton, la literatura no había conocido semejante goloso de las palabras. Como si se hubiera dado cuenta de que la ciecnia había arrebatado al lenguaje muchas de sus antiguas posesiones, de sus colonias periféricas, Joyce quiso anexionarle una nuevo reino subterráneo. El Ulises pesca en su red luminosa la confusión viva de la vida inconsciente; Finnegan´s Wake destruye los bastiones del sueño, Joyce, como nadie había después de Milton, devuelve al oído inglés la vasta magnificiencia de su ancestro. Comanda grandes batallones de palabras, recluta nuevas palabras hace tiempo olvidadas u oxidadas, llama a filas otras palabras nuevas convocadas por las necesidades de la imaginación.”
George Steiner

“Packed up the Dylan and the Man Ray and the Joyce
I left a note that said well I guess I got no choice
Scuse me girl while I'm kicking it to the curb
Leaving with all I need but less than I deserve”
Walter Becker

James Joyce
“Heavenly weather really. If life was always like that. Cricket weather. Sit around under sunshades. Over after over. Out. They can't play it here. Duck for six wickets. Still Captain Culler broke a window in the Kildare street club with a slog to square leg. Donnybrook fair more in their line. And the skulls we were acracking when M'Carthy took the floor. Heatwave. Won't last. Always passing, the stream of life, which in the stream of life we trace is dearer than them all.”
James Joyce, Ulysses

James Joyce
“To say that a great genius is mad, while at the same time recognizing his artistic merit, is no better than to say he is rheumatic or diabetic.”
James Joyce

James Joyce
“No, it did a lot of other things, too.
[turning down fan who asked to kiss the hand that wrote Ulysses
James Joyce

Джеймс Джойс
“- Душата се ражда - унесено поде той - именно в онези мигове, за които ти говорих. Ражда се бавно, в мрак, и нейното раждане е много по-тайнствено от това на тялото. В тази страна, още щом се роди, върху душата на човека хвърлят мрежи, за не ѝ позволят да литне. Говориш ми за националност, език, религия. Аз ще сторя всичко, за да се изплъзна от тези мрежи.”
Джеймс Джойс, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Michael Finkel
“He pilfered a copy of Ulysses, but it was possibly the one book he did not finish. 'What's the point of it? I suspect it was a bit of a joke by Joyce. He just kept his mouth shut as people read into it more then there was. Pseudo-intellectuals love to drop the name Ulysses as their favorite book. I refused to be intellectually bullied into finishing it.”
Michael Finkel, The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit

James Joyce
“Don't you think there is a certain resemblance between the mystery of the Mass and what I am trying to do?...To give people some kind of intellectual pleasure or spiritual enjoyment by converting the bread of everyday life into something that has a permanent artistic life of its own.”
James Joyce

James Joyce
“Ulisses”
James Joyce, Ulysses

“Only a determined and resourceful scholar could establish manuscript precedence - but in the race to masturbate on a printed page Proust definitely came first.”
Michael Foley, Embracing the Ordinary: Lessons From the Champions of Everyday Life

“In a sense, Joyce was Beckett's Don Quixote, and Beckett was his Sancho Panza. Joyce aspired to the One; Beckett encapsulated the fragmented many. But as each author accomplished his task, it was in the service of the other. Ultimately, Beckett's landscapes would resound with articulate silence, and his empty spaces would collect within themselves the richness of multiple shadows--a physicist would say the negative particles--of all that exists in absence, as in the white patches of an Abstract Expressionist painting. Becket would evoke, on his canvasses of vast innuendo and through the interstices of conscious and unconscious thought, the richness that Joyce had made explicit in words and intricate structure.”
Lois Gordon, The World of Samuel Beckett, 1906-1946

“If my grandfather was here, he would have died laughing ... Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man can be picked up, read, and enjoyed by virtually anybody without scholarly guides, theories, and intricate explanations, as can Ulysses, if you forget about all the hue and cry.”
Stephen J. Joyce
tags: joyce

Eugenio Fouz
“En el mundo hay gente que lee y gente que no lee. En el mundo hay gente que puede con todo y jamás abandona una lectura y hay gente que deja de leer un texto porque no le dice nada. Yo soy de los lectores que pertenecen a esta clase. Hoy he dejado de leer un libro de Pamuk, “El libro negro”. Me cuesta renunciar a la lectura, me parece un desprecio a la literatura. Me pasó con el “Ulises” de Joyce y casi me pasa lo mismo con “El jinete polaco” de Muñoz Molina. Meses después logré leerla y me emocionó la escena del encuentro, o más bien, reencuentro del hijo y el padre en una estación de trenes. Antonio Muñoz Molina alarga exageradamente las líneas. No es fácil. Con otro libro extraño de un autor extraño- Juan Rulfo- me veía incapaz de acabarlo. Más adelante pude con la novela gracias a unas líneas referentes a la grandeza de “Pedro Páramo” puestas en boca de la Reina del Sur*
Soy un lector que no lee todos los libros. Me pregunto si sería bueno anotar en un diario de lecturas como goodreads además de los libros leídos-mis pequeños desafíos- registrar igualmente los libros no leídos. Hoy he dejado de leer “El libro negro” y lo siento.

Detrás de muchas batallas ganadas se guardan muchas derrotas. Esta es mi cuenta en mi diario de lecturas goodreads

Una novela de Vargas Llosa me espera, me está esperando inquieta …

_”
Eugenio Fouz

Juan Gabriel Vásquez
“He hablado en muchas partes de la impresión que me produjo esa lectura (el Ulises), pues la novela de Joyce fue algo mucho más importante y decisivo que una mera influencia: fue la Epifanía a de una vocación.”
Juan Gabriel Vásquez, Viajes con un mapa en blanco

Juan Gabriel Vásquez
“Joyce dijo que al lector había que ponerle las cosas difíciles, porque la gente sólo aprecia lo que ha tenido que robar.”
Juan Gabriel Vásquez, Viajes con un mapa en blanco

Juan Gabriel Vásquez
“Joyce llevó a la prosa de ficción la precisión y la riqueza de recursos retóricos de la poesía. Supo, como había sabido Flaubert, que la poesía es lo que rescata y eleva el lenguaje de la novela.”
Juan Gabriel Vásquez, Viajes con un mapa en blanco
tags: joyce

« previous 1