James Joyce Quotes

Quotes tagged as "james-joyce" (showing 1-30 of 46)
James Joyce
“Think you're escaping and run into yourself. Longest way round is the shortest way home.”
James Joyce, Ulysses

James Joyce
“My heart is quite calm now. I will go back.”
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

James Joyce
“Mr Leopold Bloom ate with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls. He liked thick giblet soup, nutty gizzards, a stuffed roast heart, liverslices fried with crustcrumbs, fried hencods' roes. Most of all he liked grilled mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of faintly scented urine.”
James Joyce, Ulysses

Robert Anton Wilson
“The normal is that which nobody quite is. If you listen to seemingly dull people very closely, you'll see that they're all mad in different and interesting ways, and are merely struggling to hide it.”
Robert Anton Wilson, Masks of the Illuminati

Tom Stoppard
“[James] Joyce... an essentially private man who wished his total indifference to public notice to be universally recognized....”
Tom Stoppard, Travesties

James Joyce
“The demand that I make of my reader is that he should devote his whole life to reading my works.”
James Joyce

Ovid
“...et ignotas animum dimittit in artes, naturamque nouat. (to arts unknown he bends his wits, and alters nature.)”
Ovid, Metamorphoses

James Joyce
“I care not if I live but a day and a night, so long as my deeds live after me.”
James Joyce

Robert Anton Wilson
“You know the difference between right and wrong,' he repeated finally. 'Man, why did you need Initiation—by the Golden Dawn, or by anybody else? You are a genius, a sage, a giant among men. You have solved the problem which philosophers have been debating since antiquity—the mystery about which no two nations or tribes have ever agreed, and no two men or women have ever agreed, and no intelligent person has ever agreed totally with himself from one day to the next. You know the difference between right and wrong. I am overawed. I swoon. I figuratively kiss your feet.”
Robert Anton Wilson, Masks of the Illuminati

James Joyce
“The barometer of his emotional nature was set for a spell of riot.”
James Joyce

Christopher Hitchens
“I want to give just a slight indication of the influence the book has had. I knew that George Orwell, in his second novel, A Clergyman's Daughter , published in 1935, had borrowed from Joyce for his nighttime scene in Trafalgar Square, where Deafie and Charlie and Snouter and Mr. Tallboys and The Kike and Mrs. Bendigo and the rest of the bums and losers keep up a barrage of song snatches, fractured prayers, curses, and crackpot reminiscences. But only on my most recent reading of Ulysses did I discover, in the middle of the long and intricate mock-Shakespeare scene at the National Library, the line 'Go to! You spent most of it in Georgina Johnson's bed, clergyman's daughter.' So now I think Orwell quarried his title from there, too.”
Christopher Hitchens, Love, Poverty, and War: Journeys and Essays

Brian Celio
“Chuck Norris doesn't need to understand the work of James Joyce; James Joyce needs to understand the work of Chuck Norris.”
Brian Celio

Virginia Woolf
“The work of a queasy undergraduate scratching his pimples.
[on James Joyce's Ulysses]”
Virginia Woolf

James Joyce
“Grace before Glutton. For what we are, gifs a gross if we are, about to believe.”
James Joyce, Finnegans Wake

James Lee Schmidt
“A picture is worth a thousand words, but the way I paint I'm going to need to contact an editor. Even if I were to abstractly paint the phrase "I love you," it would be the visual equivalent of Joyce's Ulysses.
-James Lee Schmidt and Jarod Kintz”
James Lee Schmidt, liQUID PROse QUOtes

James Joyce
“Jesus was a bachelor and never lived with a woman. Surely living with a woman is one of the most difficult things a man has to do, and he never did it.”
James Joyce

James Joyce
“No, it did a lot of other things, too.
[turning down fan who asked to kiss the hand that wrote Ulysses
James Joyce

James Joyce
“Stephen picks up on Armstrong's pier, and calls Kingstown pier "a disappointed bridge" (2.22). He's joking about the fact that Ireland wanted to be connected to continental Europe but ended up being extremely isolated.”
James Joyce, Ulysses

Thomas C. Foster
“Now, Joyce being Joyce, he has about five different purposes, one not being enough for genius.”
Thomas C. Foster, How to Read Literature Like a Professor

“A Christian when opts to beg emotionally to others, disappoints the Almighty God in atleast 3 ways:
1. By Denying the Power of God to Provide for their lives (2 Timothy 3:5, Titus 1:16)
2. By still being Immature to handle Life's crisis (1 Corinthians 13:11, James 1:2-4)
3. By setting a poor example of Faith and Trust on God (Psalm 78:40-42, Psalms 34:8,9)
The difference between Emotional pleading and asking a Fellow christian to Pray is that Former belittles our God who Provides (Jehovah Jireh) while the Latter Glorifies our God Who is Enough (El Shaddai).
- Santosh Thankachan”
Santosh Thankachan

Katherine Mansfield
“This [Ulysses] is obviously the wave of the future, I'm glad I'm dying of tuberculosis.”
Katherine Mansfield

“It was not his nature to believe that he should engage in any kind of meddling or become actively involved in politics. His vocation lay in the fulfillment of a poetic mission, and he wanted to carry that mission out to the last detail, conscientiously and freely. In this sense he cursed "the disturbance of war," not because he overvalued his cultural role and saw his special poetic work endangered but because to him, in the final analysis, war meant the victory of barbarism, with the result that any kind of cultural work -- and therefore his, too -- could become involved in a bloody power struggle and be destroyed.”
Carola Giedion-Welcker

James Joyce
“Suck it yourself, sugarstick!”
James Joyce, Finnegans Wake

James Joyce
“Damn it, I can understand a fellow being hard up but what I can't understand is a fellow sponging. Couldn't he have some spark of manhood about him?”
James Joyce, Dubliners

A.J.      Smith
“He blurred his thens and his nows—in a fantastic drunken distortion—with the thisness and thenness of now and before, re-spectively; wisps of Bburke with Jane infiltrated him without her, the way dry oars still taste of salt. And it made Bburke trace Jane’s silhouette in his bedsheets with his lips, wondering if his sadness and loneliness was of any import to the grander human comedy, like the swooning soul of Joyce’s Gabriel, lost amidst a universe of snow—because, in small, unnoticeable ways, must not the sea taste of oars?”
A.J. Smith, Growth

Samuel Beckett
“We were working on what became Finnegan's Wake, and there was a knock at the door. I didn't hear it, so when Joyce said, "Come in" I wrote down "Come in". I never took it out. It made as much sense as anything else. I like to imagine earnest literary students writing theses on the meaning and implications of that "Come in" in the book.”
Samuel Beckett

James Joyce
“Tineretea are un sfârsit: sfârșitul e aici. Nu va mai fi niciodată. O știi prea bine. Și atunci? Scrie-o, blestematule, scrie-o! La ce altceva ești bun?”
James Joyce, Giacomo Joyce

James Joyce
“The sad quiet greyblue glow of the dying day came through the window and the open door, covering over and allaying quietly a sudden instinct of remorse in Stephen's heart. All that had been denied them had been freely given to him, the eldest: but the quiet glow of evening showed him in their faces no sign of rancour.”
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

James Joyce
“His blood began to murmur in his veins, murmuring like a sinful city summoned from its sleep to hear its doom.”
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

James Joyce
“I will not serve that in which I no longer believe whether it call itself my home, my fatherland or my church: and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can, using for my defense the only arms I allow myself to use---silence, exile and cunning.”
James Joyce, (Annotated) A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man ...

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