Inclusion Quotes

Quotes tagged as "inclusion" (showing 1-30 of 100)
Karen Armstrong
“We can either emphasize those aspects of our traditions, religious or secular, that speak of hatred, exclusion, and suspicion or work with those that stress the interdependence and equality of all human beings. The choice is yours. (22)”
Karen Armstrong, Twelve Steps to a Compassionate Life

“When Europeans arrived on this continent, they blew it with the Native Americans. They plowed over them, taking as much as they could of their land and valuables, and respecting almost nothing about the native cultures. They lost the wisdom of the indigenous peoples-wisdom about the land and connectedness to the great web of life…We have another chance with all these refugees. People come here penniless but not cultureless. They bring us gifts. We can synthesize the best of our traditions with the best of theirs. We can teach and learn from each other to produce a better America…”
Mary Pipher

“The continuum in which we live is not the kind of place in which middles can be unambiguously excluded. ”
Reuben Abel

Jamie Arpin-Ricci
“Tolerance is a poor substitute for embrace.”
Jamie Arpin-Ricci

Brené Brown
“In order for slavery to work, in order for us to buy, sell, beat, and trade people like animals, Americans had to completely dehumanize slaves. And whether we directly participated in that or were simply a member of a culture that at one time normalized that behavior, it shaped us. We can’t undo that level of dehumanizing in one or two generations. I believe Black Lives Matter is a movement to rehumanize black citizens. All lives matter, but not all lives need to be pulled back into moral inclusion. Not all people were subjected to the psychological process of demonizing and being made less than human so we could justify the inhumane practice of slavery.”
Brené Brown, Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone

“On their own, the leader of a church's special needs ministry can't meet every need of every volunteer or participating family. But that leader can model service in a way that caring becomes contagious.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

Jamie Arpin-Ricci
“The weaponization of belonging is one of the most "anti-christ" dynamics I have ever encountered.”
Jamie Arpin-Ricci

“One of the hallmarks of social wellness is being inclusive, not exclusive, with our friendship.”
Laurie Buchanan, PhD

“INCLUSION—It's amazing what happens when we allow the flower that is us, the flower that is them, to become part of the bouquet.”
Laurie Buchanan, PhD

“When you nurture and prioritize relationship for the volunteers, the volunteers become the ministry's greatest recruiting tools, because they tell others.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“People don't expect perfection, but they do appreciate when they see leaders who sincerely try to improve and ask for help in areas where they might be weak. You don't have to be good at everything to lead, but the best leaders are honest about where they need assistance, working to fill in those gaps, while also taking action and responsibility for areas of personal growth.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

Kristin Schell
“We live in a world where people profile and label each other, size each other up. What if we shifted our focus to our similarities? To welcoming one another, listening to stories, learning from one another? It's time to change the conversation. I believe most social ills can be healed or prevented by the simple act of talking to one another, face-to-face, at a common table.”
Kristin Schell, The Turquoise Table: Finding Community and Connection in Your Own Front Yard

“No one has ever seen the wind. We've only experienced the effects and the results of the wind. And none of us have ever seen God. Just like the movement of a pinwheel makes us sure that the wind exists, we have ways to be sure that God exists.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“It is important that the church think outside the box, actively pursuing a relationship with the family, just as Jesus Christ pursues a relationship with each of us.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“Meaning springs from belonging.”
David Steindl-Rast, Deeper Than Words: Living the Apostles' Creed

“When a child's needs fail to be met, undesirable behaviors may surface.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“In my view, the ultimate goal for a special needs ministry is to being families into a growing relationship with Jesus Christ. And in order for that to happen, a church has to be prepared to successfully accommodate the child with special needs during regular church programming.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“Everyone wins when the "burden" mind-set is abandoned and where the special needs ministry sees itself as a blessing to those who choose to be part of their community.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“Different people do different things. And no one-way of plugging in or serving in the church is more beneficial or valuable than the other. The same thing is true for our students with special needs. And it's our church's responsibility, in partnership with parents, to clear the path so that God can pursue our teens through the abilities and passions He's already given them. - Katie Garvert”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“The big-picture goal of a church's special needs ministry is to facilitate a sense of belonging inside the bigger body of Christ. Our best indicator of success is when we see a student with special needs feeling accepted, comfortable and open to the church's influence in their life. - Katie Garvert”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“Woman are told they can’t start a business. They need more positive role models. Government Contracting can be a way to get started.”
Linda Rawson, The Minority and Women-Owned Small Business Guide to Government Contracts: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started

“Showing participants in a positive light may be the first time some parents have had their child celebrated at all, let alone publicly. The church cannot underestimate the meaningful way this affects a family of a child with special needs. Using the public venue of a worship service will shape the entire church's view of disability, reminding them of God's value for everyone.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“The churches with the strongest special needs ministries seem to know the secret: a ministry leader who values their relationship with their volunteers almost as much as they value their relationship with the families they serve.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“In many cases, special needs ministry is a "business-to-business" ministry. The ministry exists to support other ministries and to help them successfully include the individual with special needs. When full inclusion is happening successfully, the work of the special needs ministry may be invisible to many people including the individual with special needs, much like the role of a business-to-business entity is invisible to the end customer.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“By and large, the special needs ministry leader is a translator of sorts, responsible for understanding and bridging the gap between two very unique cultures: the church and the special needs community.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

“As a result, the success of the ministry volunteers is often every bit as important as the success of the participating kids. And the skills of the ministry leaders do impact the accommodation plans that are developed for participants with special needs.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

L.A. Banks
“It's suicide," Doc Holland said, shaking his head. "Fools, all of them. This isn't any conventional war- this is madness."

The general let out a weary breath. "No, Doctor-this is fear . . . and fear makes fools of us all.”
L.A. Banks, Never Cry Werewolf

“It is also worth noting that the strengths (or weaknesses) of a particular group leader may factor into the placement decisions for a specific child.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

DaShanne Stokes
“Urging people to be inclusive is not an attack. It is progress.”
DaShanne Stokes

“Keep in mind that it is not the responsibility of a church leader to make all the people happy all the time. It is their responsibility to set everyone up for success: the individual with special needs, their peers, and the leaders serving them all.”
Amy Fenton Lee, Leading a Special Needs Ministry

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