Hurricanes Quotes

Quotes tagged as "hurricanes" Showing 1-21 of 21
George Carlin
“Do you know why hurricanes have names instead of numbers? To keep the killing personal. No one cares about a bunch of people killed by a number. '200 Dead as Number Three Slams Ashore' is not nearly as interesting a headline as 'Charlie kills 200.' Death is much more satisfying and entertaining if you personalize it.

Me, I'm still waitin' for Hurricane Ed. Old Ed wouldn't hurt ya, would he? Sounds kinda friendly. 'Hell no, we ain't evacuatin'. Ed's comin'!”
George Carlin, Brain Droppings

Shannon L. Alder
“Every romantic knows that love was never a noun; it is a verb.”
Shannon L. Alder

Ernest Hemingway
“He knew too what it was to live through a hurricane with the other people of the island and the bond that the hurricane made between all people who had been through it. He also knew that hurricanes could be so bad that nothing could live through them.”
Ernest Hemingway, Islands in the Stream

“Some people can find peace in the middle of a hurricane; that’s the person I’m striving to be.”
Stephen F. Campbell

Kristin Neff
“Despite the fact we give hurricanes names like Katrina and Rita, a hurricane isn't a self-contained unit. A hurricane is an impermanent, ever-changing phenomenon arising out of a particular set of interacting conditions - air pressure, ground temperature, humidity, wind and so on. The same applies to us: we aren't self-contained units either. Like weather patterns, we are also an impermanent, ever-changing phenomenon arising out of a particular set of interacting conditions. Without food, water, air and shelter, we'd be dead. Without our genes, family, friends, social history, and culture, wouldn't act or feel as we do.”
Kristin Neff, Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself

Caitlín R. Kiernan
“Demons never die quietly, and a week ago the storm was a proper demon, sweeping through the Caribbean after her long ocean crossing from Africa, a category five when she finally came ashore at San Juan before moving on to Santo Domingo and then Cuba and Florida. But now she's grown very old, as her kind measures age, and these are her death throes. So she holds tightly to this night, hanging on with the desperate fury of any dying thing, any dying thing that might once have thought itself invincible.”
Caitlin R. Kiernan

Liza Lugo
“What we are now witnessing in the 21st century is the fracture or complete breakdown of families, societies, and governments as a result of centuries of dehumanization that have taken a toll. More natural disasters (tsunamis, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados, etc.) merely uncover the reality of the national disasters we have created by granting sanctuary to dehumanization via the law.”
Liza Lugo, How Do Hurricane Katrina's Winds Blow? Racism in 21st-Century New Orleans

Lauren Oliver
“Just listen, okay?" He grabs my shoulders before I can move past him, and I know, I know that something huge is happening, the kind of thing that takes worlds apart and remakes them. Hurricanes and tornadoes and boys with blue eyes.”
Lauren Oliver, Broken Things

“She still looked like a force to be reckoned with. Her short stature made her look cute and innocent, but I knew that was an illusion. She had fire in her boiler. Maybe it was misdirected, but I liked that fire.”
Bud Rudesill, Hurricane Ginger

“Trials in life help us to grow. They make us better. Challenge yourself to become a better version of yourself as a result of the flood, and to take what you have learned to help others. Focus on tomorrow, not on past mistakes – yours or anyone else’s.”
Dr. Dwan Reed

N.K. Jemisin
“The days which bracketed hurricanes were painful in their clarity, sharp edge clouds, blue sky hard as a cop's eyes.”
N.K. Jemisin, How Long 'til Black Future Month?

Liza Lugo
“What we are now witnessing in the 21st century is the fracture or complete breakdown of families, societies, and governments as a result of centuries of dehumanization that have taken a toll. More natural disasters (tsunamis, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados, etc.) merely uncover the reality of the national disasters we have created by grandting sanctuary to dehumanization via the law.”
Liza Lugo, How Do Hurricane Katrina's Winds Blow? Racism in 21st-Century New Orleans

Wahletta Hale
“Dance...even when you're alone; it makes you feel good.”
Wahletta Hale, Missing Starr: A Florida Coastal Fishing Village Mystery

Jenim Dibie
“Would you come back if I turned my tears into hurricanes and named them after you?”
Jenim Dibie

Hank Bracker
“The United States quietly began exporting food to Cuba in 2001, following the devastating hurricane Michelle. In 2000, President Clinton authorized the sale of certain humanitarian products and the United States is again the island's primary food supplier. Annual food sales to Cuba peaked at $710 million in 2008. The Latin American Working Group coordinates relief efforts with Cuba in times of need.
There has been a lengthy history binding the two countries, which should not be forgotten. American corporate abuses on the island nation is one of the overwhelming factors deterring Cuba from stabilizing affairs with the United States and the fact that Cuba’s government is a dictatorial, communistic régime stands in the way of the United States opening negotiations with them. Guantánamo Naval Base has been held for a long period of time, perhaps too long, and for questionable reasons, whereas Cuba has incarcerated people for political reasons, including some Americans, for far too long. Families have been divided and animosities have continued. Special interest groups, including a very vocal Cuban population in South Florida, continue to block the U.S. Government from initiating reasonable legislature regarding U.S. interests in Cuba, while many other countries carry on normal relations with the country.
What is happening now is a reversal and counterproductive. It would seem that now should be a good time for the U.S. and Cuba to become reasonably good neighbors again….”
Captain Hank Bracker, "The Exciting Story of Cuba"

Nitya Prakash
“I am not here for calm waters anymore. I want to be known for my love for hurricanes.”
Nitya Prakash

E.B. White
“The idea, of course, is that the radio shall perform a public service by warning people of a storm that might prove fatal; and this the radio certainly does. But another effect of the radio is to work people up to an incredible state of alarm many hours in advance of the blow, while they are still fanned by the mildest zephyrs. One of the victims of Hurricane Edna was a civil-defense worker whose heart failed him long before the wind threatened him in the least.
E.B. White "The Eye of Edna”
E. B. White

Claire  Hunter
“Your response to any major event will only be as good as you have planned”
Claire Hunter, The Survivor’s Guide to Monster Storms: Practical Advice to Keep You and Your Family Safe

A.D. Aliwat
“It’s terrible, what’s happening out there. The storm rages on, winds ululant, rain spraying every which way.”
A.D. Aliwat, In Limbo

“Hurricane Katrina is easily a metaphor for America's attitude toward Black women: rejected, neglected, and never protected. But Black women's persistence and their insistence on survival and restoration are a metaphor for their attitude toward America.”
Deborah Douglas, Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019

“The lexicon must make room for white patriarchy's specific way of disregarding the humanity of Black women in literal physical spaces like New Orleans during and after Katrina, and in the narratives and policy making that either created a pathway home or left them stranded. Every step of the Katrina response "depresenced" Black women, forced them to bear the weight of natural disaster while carrying the cellular memory of trauma one can imagine will pass through bloodlines like so many others.

Unlike erasure, which requires one's presence to be recognized so it can be obliterated, depresencing never acknowledges presence at all. When deployed, people just look right through Black women as if they weren't there.

As violent and silent as depresencing is, there's an antidote. The response to Hurricane Katrina was not the first time the U.S. government abandoned Black women, and it would not be the last. Black women resisted by showing up in the story of their lives, by loving, learning, and leading--despite the systemic barriers and humiliations designed to make them small enough to practically disappear. But Black women did not disappear, and they will not disappear because we know something established power does not: we are something.”
Deborah Douglas, Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019