Filmmaking Quotes

Quotes tagged as "filmmaking" Showing 1-30 of 139
Martin Scorsese
“Cinema is a matter of what's in the frame and what's out”
Martin Scorsese

Guillermo del Toro
“The saddest journey in the world is the one that follows a precise itinerary. Then you're not a traveler. You're a f@@king tourist.”
Guillermo del Toro

“I foresee no possibility of venturing into themes showing a closer view of reality for a long time to come. The public itself will not have it. What it wants is a gun and a girl.”
D.W. Griffith

Werner Herzog
“Read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read...if you don't read, you will never be a filmmaker.”
Werner Herzog

Robert Rodríguez
“When given an opportunity, deliver excellence and never quit.”
Robert Rodriguez, Rebel Without a Crew, or How a 23-Year-Old Filmmaker with $7,000 Became a Hollywood Player

Dziga Vertov
“I'm an eye. A mechanical eye. I, the machine, show you a world the way only I can see it. I free myself for today and forever from human immobility. I'm in constant movement. I approach and pull away from objects. I creep under them. I move alongside a running horse's mouth. I fall and rise with the falling and rising bodies. This is I, the machine, manoeuvring in the chaotic movements, recording one movement after another in the most complex combinations.

Freed from the boundaries of time and space, I co-ordinate any and all points of the universe, wherever I want them to be. My way leads towards the creation of a fresh perception of the world. Thus I explain in a new way the world unknown to you.”
Dziga Vertov

Krzysztof Kieślowski
“Or take this girl, for example. At a meeting just outside Paris, a fifteen-year-old girl came up to me and said that she'd been to see [The Double Life of] Véronique. She'd gone once, twice, three times and only wanted to say one thing really - that she realized that there is such a thing as a soul. She hadn't known before, but now she knew that the soul does exist. There's something very beautiful in that. It was worth making Véronique for that girl. It was worth working for a year, sacrificing all that money, energy, time, patience, torturing yourself, killing yourself, taking thousands of decisions, so that one young girl in Paris should realize that there is such a thing as a soul. It's worth it.”
Krzysztof Kieślowski, Kieslowski on Kieslowski

Robert Bresson
“My movie is born first in my head, dies on paper; is resuscitated by the living persons and real objects I use, which are killed on film but, placed in a certain order and projected onto a screen, come to life again like flowers in water.”
Robert Bresson, Notes on the Cinematographer

Carrie Fisher
“The crew was mostly men. That's how it was and that's pretty much how it still is. It's a man's world & show business is a man's meal with women generously sprinkled through it like over-qualified spice.”
Carrie Fisher, The Princess Diarist

Robert Bresson
“The eye solicited alone makes the ear impatient, the ear solicited alone makes the eye impatient. Use these impatiences. Power of the cinematographer who appeals to the two senses in a governable way.
Against the tactics of speed, of noise, set tactics of slowness, of silence.”
Robert Bresson

John Cassavetes
“Film is, to me, just unimportant. But people are very important.”
John Cassavetes, Cassavetes on Cassavetes

Peter Greenaway
“I have often thought it was very arrogant to suppose you could make a film for anybody but yourself.”
Peter Greenaway

Darlene Craviotto
“Collaborating on a film script involves two people sitting in a room separated by the silence of two minds working together.”
Darlene Craviotto, An Agoraphobic's Guide to Hollywood: How Michael Jackson Got Me Out of the House

Robert Lynn Asprin
“Meanwhile, back at reality..."- G.Lucas”
Robert Lynn Asprin, Sweet Myth-Tery of Life

Béla Tarr
“Most of the movies are working like, 'Information, cut, information, cut, information, cut' and for them the information is just the story. For me, a lot of things [are] information - I try to involve, to the movie, the time, the space, and a lot of other things - which is a part of our life but not connecting directly to the story-telling. And I'm working on the same way - 'information, cut, information, cut,' but for me the information is not only the story.”
Béla Tarr

Katherine Howe
“When I looked at life through the camera, I felt like I could finally see it.”
Katherine Howe, The Appearance of Annie Van Sinderen

“It's something of a parodox that film, the art that most resembles our
daydreams, is the one most difficult to bring into existence.”
Steven D. Katz, Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept to Screen

Mick LaSalle
“Hollywood’s motives in marketing sex may have been cynical—Hollywood’s motives always are. But in providing audiences with sophisticated fare, it was also responding to real cultural changes that had happened within American society. Hollywood was a few years behind the trend, of course, but that’s nothing new. Don’t forget, this is the same industry that for seventy years has made wonderful, passionate, stirring anti-war movies six or seven years after every war, never during one.”
Mick LaSalle, Complicated Women: Sex and Power in Pre-Code Hollywood

Stewart Stafford
“The foundation of Hollywood alchemically turned celluloid into gold and insincerity into an art form.”
Stewart Stafford

Adrienne Posey
“The more of those little light bulbs that can turn on the better. Eventually you'll have enough to light up a movie screen.”
Adrienne Posey

Adrienne Posey
“Hollywood shines by virtue of light within.”
Adrienne Posey

Adrienne Posey
“All the promise of a movie is in the trailer.”
Adrienne Posey

“Readers of the book, paradoxically, will have a different kind of surprise in store for them: What many "Vertigo" aficionados will find perplexing are the systematic, businesslike, matter of fact circumstances under which this odd, obsessional, very un-matter-of-fact film was created.”
Dan Auiler, Vertigo: The Making of a Hitchcock Classic

David Bordwell
“Someone might ask, if the dynamic of innovation consists of schema and revision, where does true originality come from? Is there no single work we can point to as the ultimate source of this or that new storrytelling strategy? I'm inclined to say there is no such source. Artists working in mass art forms find originality by revising schemas in circulation, or by revising ones that have fallen into disuse.”
David Bordwell, Reinventing Hollywood: How 1940s Filmmakers Changed Movie Storytelling

“Music, too, offers a photograph of the world; characteristically, however, it does this not by copying a few figured sounds but rather by lifting all of the mixed images of extravagance, gushing overflow, and flaming fullness offered by life in its entirety from their immediate objects and weaving them into a carpet—a carpet with its own all-encompassing intensity, quality, and therefore reality.”
Ernest Bloch

Mick LaSalle
“It was strange. It was painful. It was wonderful. It was something unique to the twentieth century. To sit in a theater in 1994 and fall in love with a woman from 1929 … that would be like sitting in a theater in 1929 and falling in love with someone from 1864 … or like watching 1994 from the year 2059. These leaps across time are fantastic. Yet it’s inevitable that soon people will think nothing of watching a movie from a century before, any more than we would consider it odd to read a hundred-year-old book.”
Mick LaSalle, Complicated Women: Sex and Power in Pre-Code Hollywood

“I always think of my craft of what can go terribly wrong, it's what makes a film feel more alive.”
Zak Templeman

Roberto Rossellini
“I want you to know how deeply I wish to translate those ideas into images, just to quiet down the turmoil of my brain. (in a letter to Ingrid Bergman)”
Roberto Rossellini

Roberto Rossellini
“I want you to know how deeply I wish to translate those ideas into images, just to quiet down the turmoil of my brain.”
Roberto Rossellini

Karl Kristian Flores
“A post-movie dance: [You walk out of the theatre. You stretch. You toss your popcorn in the trash bin and wonder if it’s recycling. You pretend to be a slow walker on your way to the exit so you don’t appear too close to the stranger in front of you. You walk to the bathroom. You wait in line. You piss. You hold your fart. You come out. You walk to the parking garage. You walk back to the theatre because you forgot to validate your ticket. You come back to your car. You leave the garage. You get a phone call from mom and talk to her. Then you turn on the radio in traffic. Then you come home and respond to e-mails and go back to sleep. And soon, a movie has died.]”
Karl Kristian Flores, The Goodbye Song

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