Fey Quotes

Quotes tagged as "fey" Showing 1-30 of 62
Sarah J. Maas
“Say it,” I gritted out.
“The High Lord of the Night Court is your mate.”
Sarah J. Maas, A Court of Mist and Fury

Kresley Cole
“And if you don’t think I can hold my own against all those eighteenth-century mortals you were out tagging, then you’re a fool, Casanova.” ... “Oh, yes, I know all about you.”

He went still. “What are you talking about?”

“I was alive back then. And all the Lore heard about the ruthless warlord brothers from Estonia. The general, the scholar, the enigma, and . . . the manwhore.”
Kresley Cole, Deep Kiss of Winter

Julie Kagawa
“Time has no meaning in the wyldwood. Day and night don't really exist here, just light and darkness, and they can be as fickle and moody as everything else. A "night" can pass in the space of a blink, or go on forever. Light and darkness will chase each other through the sky, play hide-and-seek or tag or catch-me-if-you-can. Sometimes, one or the other will become offended...and refuse to come out for an indefinite amount of time. Once, light became so angry, a hundred years passed in the mortal realm before it deigned to come out again. And though the sun continued to rise and set in the human world, it was a rather turbulent period for the world of men, as all the creatures who lurked in darkness and shadow got to roam freely under the lightless Nevernever skies.”
Julie Kagawa, The Iron Knight

C.S. Einfeld
“For it is a true fact that faeries, just like people, very often find that a full belly and a good friend are all that they need to be happy.”
C.S. Einfeld, Neverdark

Karen Chance
“How did you hear about that?'
'Are you kidding me? So far, I had that runt Kyle-'
'I hate him. I hate all vamps. That complete toad, Michael-'
'-tell me you were pregnant by a vamp-'
'kidnnaped me and-Kyle said WHAT?'
'and then a member of the Domi shows up and informs me-'
'The Domi sent someone HERE?'
'-that you're actually pregnant by the late king of the Fey.'
'Late?!' Heidar squeaked.”
Karen Chance, Midnight's Daughter

Charlotte Featherstone
“He towered over her, dwarfing her with his height and the bulk of his body which was clothed in the way of a mortal gentleman. He felt and heard that voice tremble inside her, replaced the rational voice she allowed to go unchecked. 'He could break me, hurt me, dominate me'.

"Not break. Not hurt." he murmured as he raised a hand to her cheek and smoothed his fingers down its softness, "But dominate you? Yes. Master you? yes. Make you yield to what you want, make you surrender to who you truly are? Yes.”
Charlotte Featherstone, Lust

W.B. Yeats
“Fairies in Ireland are sometimes as big as we are, sometimes bigger, and sometimes, as I have been told, about three feet high.”
William Butler Yeats

Julie Kagawa
“Glitter and streamers of light swirled around
us, and a chorus of tiny voices sang out a single note. I
winced, knowing there was only one person who thought a
normal entrance, like walking through a door, wasn’t good
enough for her; she had to announce her presence with
sparkle and glitter and St. Peter’s choir.”
Julie Kagawa, Summer's Crossing

Brian Froud
“I've been actively engaged with mythic imagery ever since I picked up that Rackham book, but it really came into focus for me when I moved from London to the country. As I walked the extraordinary landscape of Dartmoor, I looked at the trees and the rocks and the hills and I could see the personality in those forms...then they metamorphosed under my pencil into faeries, goblins and trolls. After Alan and I published "Faeries", he moved on from the subject of faery folklore to illustrate Tolkien and other literary works...while I discovered that my own exploration of Faerieland had only just begun. In the countryside, the old stories seemed to come alive around me; the faeries were a tangible aspect of the landscape, pulses of spirit, emotion, and light. They "insisted" on taking form under my pencil, emerging on the page before me cloaked in archetypal shapes drawn from nature and myth. I'd attracted their attention, you see, and they hadn't finished with me yet.”
Brian Froud

W.B. Yeats
“There are some doubters even in the western villages. One woman told me last Christmas that she did not believe either in hell or in ghosts. Hell she thought was merely an invention got up by the priest to keep people good; and ghosts would not be permitted, she held, to go 'trapsin about the earth' at their own free will; 'but there are faeries,' she added, 'and little leprechauns, and water-horses, and fallen angels.' I have met also a man with a mohawk Indian tattooed upon his arm, who held exactly similar beliefs and unbeliefs. No matter what one doubts one never doubts the faeries, for, as the man with the mohawk Indian on his arm said to me, 'they stand to reason.' Even the official mind does not escape this faith. ("Reason and Unreason")”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore

Terri Windling
“(...) Some fairy lore makes a clear division between good and wicked types of fairies — between those who are friendly to mankind, and those who seek to cause us harm. In Scottish tales, good fairies make up the Seelie Court, which means the Blessed Court, while bad fairies congregate in the Unseelie Court, ruled by the dark queen Nicnivin. In old Norse myth, the Liosálfar (Light Elves) are regal, compassionate creatures who live in the sky in the realm of Alfheim, while the Döckálfar (the Dark Elves) live underground and are greatly feared. Yet in other traditions, a fairy can be good or bad, depending on the circumstance or on the fairy's whim. They are often portrayed as amoral beings, rather than as immoral ones, who simply have little comprehension of human notions of right and wrong.

The great English folklorist Katherine Briggs tended to avoid the "good" and "bad" division, preferring the categorizations of Solitary and Trooping Fairies instead. (...)”
Terri Windling, The Faery Reel: Tales from the Twilight Realm

W.B. Yeats
“He had many strange sights to keep him cheerful or to make him sad. I asked him had he ever seen the faeries, and got the reply, 'Am I not annoyed with them?' I asked too if he had ever seen the banshee. 'I have seen it,' he said, 'down there by the water, batting the river with its hands.' ("A Teller of Tales")”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore

Lewis Spence
“In all likelihood fairies of larger stature were ancient gods in a state of decay, while their diminutive congeners were the swarming spirits of primitive imagination.”
Lewis Spence, British Fairy Origins

W.B. Yeats
“By the Hospital Lane goes the 'Faeries Path.' Every evening they travel from the hill to the sea, from the sea to the hill. At the sea end of their path stands a cottage. One night Mrs. Arbunathy, who lived there, left her door open, as she was expecting her son. Her husband was asleep by the fire; a tall man came in and sat beside him. After he had been sitting there for a while, the woman said, 'In the name of God, who are you?' He got up and went out, saying, 'Never leave the door open at this hour, or evil may come to you.' She woke her husband and told him. 'One of the good people has been with us,' said he. ("Village Ghosts")”
W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore

Emma Bull
“I’ve told you that I’m a tricksy wight, and I am, my sweet. But there are those in the Seelie Court who would make me seem a very perfect knight.”
Emma Bull, War for the Oaks

Lewis Spence
“In my view the study of fairy origins assumes a greater degree of importance than popular opinion is wont to concede to it. Indeed, the ideas associated with it strike at the very roots of human belief and primitive methods of reasoning. It is scarcely to be questioned that the explanation of fairy origins is of the utmost value to the better comprehension of primitive religion. Later it will be made clear that, for the writer at least, the whole tradition of Faerie reveals quite numerous and excellent proofs of its former existence as a primitive and separate cult and faith, more particularly as regards its appearance and tradition in these islands.”
Lewis Spence, British Fairy Origins

Lewis Spence
“Some discussion of the nature and temperament of the fairies is necessary in view of its possible bearing on their origin. J. G. Campbell tells us that in the Highlands of Scotland they were regarded as "the counterparts of mankind, but substantial and unreal, outwardly invisible." They differ from mortals in the possession of magical power, but are strangely dependent in many ways on man. They are generally considered by the folk at large as of a nature between spirits and men. "They are," says Wentz, "a distinct race between our own and that of spirits.”
Lewis Spence, British Fairy Origins

Kate McCafferty
“To dance to fey music is the beginning of the end.”
Kate McCafferty, Testimony of an Irish Slave Girl
tags: end, fey, music

Lewis Spence
“All three of the English types I have mentioned can, I think, be accounted for as the results of the presence of different cultures, existing side by side in the country, and who were the creation of the folk in ages distantly removed one from another. In a word, they represent specific " strata" of folk-imagination. The most diminutive of all are very probably to be associated with a New Stone Age conception of spirits which haunted burial-mounds and rude stone monuments. We find such tiny spirits haunting the great stone circles of Brittany. The "Small People," or diminutive fairies of Cornwall, says Hunt, are believed to be "the spirits of people who inhabited Cornwall many thousands of years ago. "The spriggans, of the same area, are a minute and hirsute family of fairies" found only about the cairns, cromlechs, barrows, or detached stones, with which it is unlucky to meddle." Of these, the tiny fairies of Shakespeare, Drayton, and the Elizabethans appear to me to be the later representatives. The latter are certainly not the creation of seventeenth-century poets, as has been stated, but of the aboriginal folk of Britain.”
Lewis Spence, British Fairy Origins

Lewis Spence
“But this is not to say that a highly specialized body of belief such as that associated with Faerie is not capable of subsidiary explanations apart from this very general conclusion, specially in connection with those later and accretive ideas which must have grown up around it. Admittedly there is a common basis for the origin of all beliefs associated with the origin of spirits, which is to be found alone in the doctrine of animism. This notwithstanding, and with all due respect to the warnings of Krappe, Hartland, and others concerning the risks accruing to the scientific classification of spiritual forms, certain types of spirits with markedly separate characteristics have assuredly been conceived, and have been given diverse denominations and descriptions by those who believed in their existence. Of this the fairy type is indeed a case in point; and however correct it may be to say that it cannot basically be separated from the ghost, the goblin, or the demon, it has, in the course of ages, assumed characteristics which in a secondary sense distinguish it sufficiently from all of these to permit the scientific observer, and to some extent the peasant or the savage, to rank it as a separate variety of spirit, if not as a distinct species.”
Lewis Spence, British Fairy Origins

Michael Montoure
“What do you tell someone who hasn't live through it all?

Try to explain what it's like, living under a pressure-front of madness crawling up out of the sea - the fairy folk nearly done with their centuries-long crossing of the Atlantic. Tell him about the watchtowers of the air, brought to earth by fire in New York. Tell him about New Orleans, all its magic and voudoun drawing the Fey like a magnet, the ocean rising up to meet it. By the time they burn like wildfire all across the country to Hollywood, the whole world will be dreaming their dreams.”
Michael Montoure, Slices

Kayla   Edwards
“I’m a monster,” she’d said. “My magic does nothing but kill.”

“Your magic protects, Sable. It protects, and it destroys, but that doesn’t mean it has to destroy the peace. The sooner you learn to master your gift, the sooner you can use it to help those in need.” Still, she’d shaken her head.

“Fine,” he’d said. “But mark my words, one day you will show the world who and what you are. And when that day comes, you will not be afraid. Burn entire forests. Turn winter into summer. Melt the damned North if you must. And when you stand there, upon ground that hasn’t seen the sun in centuries, I want you to smile. Because only you can do that, Sable. Only you.”

That day hadn’t come yet, but maybe it would. One day.”
Kayla Edwards, Dreams of Ice and Iron

Kayla   Edwards
“When you love someone, they become a part of you, like bone or blood. The impact they had on you is impossible to erase.”
Kayla Edwards, Dreams of Ice and Iron

Kayla   Edwards
“I believe when you feel pain there is no better remedy than to talk it out, like birds flying through the doors of a cage finally opened. The past will not stay in the past until you set it free, and to do that, you first need to heal.”
Kayla Edwards, Dreams of Ice and Iron

Kayla   Edwards
“I don’t think it’s possible to ever stop loving someone. In time, those feelings simply become buried beneath other ones. But once in a while you will see something that reminds you of them, something that causes those feelings to suddenly stir awake. And for one split second, it throws you back to that time—months ago, years ago, however long ago it might be—and you remember. And you feel.”
Kayla Edwards, Dreams of Ice and Iron

Kayla   Edwards
“Everything I read of Hilandria suggested she was lovely, viewed as the most beautiful among the elemental gods, and among the High Ones, she was second only to Ismay herself. They say her skin smelled of cedar fires, and when she laughed, her eyes sparked.”
Kayla Edwards, Dreams of Ice and Iron

Kayla   Edwards
“We all bleed, General. You’re no more immune to Death than the rest of us.”
Kayla Edwards, Dreams of Ice and Iron

Jocelyn Adams
“His scent engulfed me - fresh night air and evergreen. I buried my face in the hollow beneath his jaw as he shoved his Light into me- a terrible force of the sort I'd never imagined, hungry for distraction, intoxicating to the point of addiction.”
Jocelyn Adams

Ruby Mohan
“Is it the game that reels me?”
Ruby Mohan, UNSETTLED

Kayla   Edwards
“If you could feel even half the pain I’ve endured, you wouldn’t believe that,” she said, her voice raw. “I’ve seen snow, red with a little girl’s blood. Royal chambers scorched to ash and a dead mother surrounded by men who’d harmed her in unspeakable ways. I’ve seen babies smothered by fathers because they cannot afford to feed them; children instructed to fight when they aren’t strong enough to lift a sword.” She took a step closer to him. “I’ve seen Death, Hunter Northridge. And Death is not merciful.”
“Yet you do not fear it.” It was a statement.
Sable shook her head. “No,” she confirmed. “I do not.”
“You only fear what it might do to the ones you love.”
Kayla Edwards, Dreams of Ice and Iron

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