Ethnicity Quotes

Quotes tagged as "ethnicity" Showing 1-30 of 82
Simone Elkeles
“Tofu tacos are not Mexican. I think putting tofu on anything and calling it Mexican is an insult to my people.”
Simone Elkeles, Rules of Attraction

Ana Monnar
“Choose your friends and mates, not by the money in their bank account, creed, ethnicity, or color; instead, choose character, actions, heart, and soul. When we bleed, we bleed the same color.”
Ana Monnar

Erin Gruwell
“I have always been taught to be proud of being Latina, proud of being Mexican, and I was. I was probably more proud of being a "label" than of being a human being, that's the way most of us were taught.”
Erin Gruwell, The Freedom Writers Diary

Courtney Love
“[Kurt Cobain] had a lot of German in him. Some Irish. But no Jew. I think that if he had had a little Jew he would have [expletive] stuck it out.”
Courtney Love

“We need to eliminate the concept of division by class, skills, race, income, religion, and nationality. Every human requires food and water to survive and every human has a heart that bleeds, loves, and grieves.”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

“This is God's universe and he is the master gardener of all. If we were to eliminate all colors in his garden,then what would be a rainbow with only one color? Or a garden with only one kind of flower? Why would the Creator create a vast assortment of plants, ethnicities, and animals, if only one beast or seed is to dominate all of existence?”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

Savo Heleta
“My mom and dad refused to believe that people who had grown up together in peace and friendship, had gone to the same schools, spoken the same language, and listened to the same music, could overnight be blinded by ethnic hatred and start to brutally kill one another. They simply didn't accept as true that less than two years of a multiparty system and competition for power could poison people's brains so much.”
Savo Heleta, Not My Turn to Die: Memoirs of a Broken Childhood in Bosnia

Will Kymlicka
“The state does not oppose the freedom of people to express their particular cultural attachments, but nor does it nurture such expression—rather [...] it responds with 'benign neglect' [....] The members of ethnic and national groups are protected against discrimination and prejudice, and they are free to maintain whatever part of their ethnic heritage or identity they wish, consistent with the rights of others. But their efforts are purely private, and it is not the place of public agencies to attach legal identities or disabilities to cultural membership or ethnic identity. This separation of state and ethnicity precludes any legal or governmental recognition of ethnic groups, or any use of ethnic criteria in the distribution of rights, resources, and duties.”
Will Kymlicka, Multicultural Citizenship: A Liberal Theory of Minority Rights

“The world citizen is a small leaf on the giant tree of life. They do not see a difference between the branch they were born on and the remaining branches on the tree, because they understand well that we are are all connected to the same roots. The world citizen sees each section of the world as part of their arm, leg, eyes, and heart. They do not class, contain or separate themselves or their identity by ethnicity or religion -- because they see their existence as a small part of a greater whole. When asked about their religion, the world citizen simply replies: 'My heart.”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

Savo Heleta
“The story Grandpa told us helped me realize that people cannot be divided into groups by ethnicity, religion, or any other feature, only into groups of good, bad, and indifferent people.”
Savo Heleta, Not My Turn to Die: Memoirs of a Broken Childhood in Bosnia

Christopher Hitchens
“The neo-cons, or some of them, decided that they would back Clinton when he belatedly decided for Bosnia and Kosovo against Milosevic, and this even though they loathed Clinton, because the battle against religious and ethnic dictatorship in the Balkans took precedence. This, by the way, was partly a battle to save Muslims from Catholic and Christian Orthodox killers. That impressed me. The neo-cons also took the view, quite early on, that coexistence with Saddam Hussein was impossible as well as undesirable. They were dead right about that. They had furthermore been thinking about the menace of jihadism when most people were half-asleep.

And then I have to say that I was rather struck by the way that the Weekly Standard and its associated voices took the decision to get rid of Trent Lott earlier this year, thus removing an embarrassment as well as a disgrace from the political scene. And their arguments were on points of principle, not 'perception.' I liked their ruthlessness here, and their seriousness, at a time when much of the liberal Left is not even seriously wrong, but frivolously wrong, and babbles without any sense of responsibility. (I mean, have you read their sub-Brechtian stuff on Halliburton....?) And revolution from above, in some states and cases, is—as I wrote in my book A Long Short War—often preferable to the status quo, or to no revolution at all.”
Christopher Hitchens, Christopher Hitchens and His Critics: Terror, Iraq, and the Left

Wayne Gerard Trotman
“Those without heritage, history, and place are subject to exploitation, manipulation, and deception.”
Wayne Gerard Trotman

Christopher Hitchens
“Actual class struggles apart, one of the aesthetic ways you could prove that there was a class system in America was by cogitating on the word, or acronym, 'WASP.' First minted by E. Digby Baltzell in his book The Protestant Establishment , the term stood for 'White Anglo-Saxon Protestant.' Except that, as I never grew tired of pointing out, the 'W' was something of a redundancy (there being by definition no BASPs or JASPs for anyone to be confused with, or confused about). 'ASP,' on the other hand, lacked some of the all-important tone. There being so relatively few Anglo-Saxon Catholics in the United States, the 'S' [sic] was arguably surplus to requirements as well. But then the acronym AS would scarcely do, either. And it would raise an additional difficulty. If 'Anglo-Saxon' descent was the qualifying thing, which surely it was, then why were George Wallace and Jerry Falwell not WASPs? After all, they were not merely white and Anglo-Saxon and Protestant, but very emphatic about all three things. Whereas a man like William F. Buckley, say, despite being a white Irish Catholic, radiated the very sort of demeanor for which the word WASP had been coined to begin with. So, for the matter of that, did the dapper gentleman from Richmond, Virginia, Tom Wolfe. Could it be, then, that WASP was really a term of class rather than ethnicity? Q.E.D.”
Christopher Hitchens, Hitch 22: A Memoir

Sharon Hurley Hall
“To be white in the Caribbean is to have money, power, and the freedom to do anything or nothing - it is, in many cases, to occupy the top rung of society.”
Sharon Hurley Hall, Exploring Shadeism

Sharon Hurley Hall
“The experience of slavery is the bedrock on which Caribbean society has been founded.”
Sharon Hurley Hall, Exploring Shadeism

Roxanna
“you were in my dream last night. it was good to see you again.”
Roxanna, Me, She and Her

“The Arabic Qur'an and authoritative Christian translations of the Bible into a limited number of languages contributed profoundly to the universalisation of a single ethnic religious—linguistic community in the Muslim case and to the distinction between major written languages and dialectic vernaculars in the Christian case. While the Islamic socio-political impact was thus in principle almost entirely anti-ethnic and anti-national, the Christian impact was more complex. Its willingness to translate brought with it, undoubtedly, a reduction in the number of ethnicities and vernaculars, but then a confirmation of the individual identity of those that remained: Christianity in fact helped turn ethnicities into nations.”
Adrian Hastings, The Construction of Nationhood: Ethnicity, Religion and Nationalism

“Don’t despise people based on their colour, ethnicity or creed. God loves variety, So, live with it.”
Abiodun Fijabi

“I learned about how scholars and politicians from back when the word "DNA" hadn't even existed spouted off colorful lies to discriminate against other ethnic groups.

Screw it. I decided to become Norwegian.”
Kazuki Kaneshiro, Go

Tressie McMillan Cottom
“In sociology, we often refer to black people who are in the United States but who are not descendants of either the enslaved or, later, of those who experienced the Great Migration as “black ethnics.” It is a complicated term because it implies that black Americans do not have an ethnicity.”
Tressie McMillan Cottom

Tressie McMillan Cottom
“He means what kind of special negro are you?”
Tressie McMillan Cottom, Thick: And Other Essays

Kate Raworth
“...a study of all 50 U.S. States found that those states marked out by large inequalities of power in terms of income and ethnicity had weaker environmental policies and suffered greater ecological degradation. Furthermore, one study covering 50 countries found the more unequal a country is, the more likely the biodiversity of its landscape is to be under threat.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Many if not most blacks readily look down on some blacks because of their ethnicity or nationality. Yet they have a problem with their being looked down on, because of their race, by many if not most whites.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Dietrich Bonhoeffer
“The universality of the church was illustrated in a marvelously effective manner. White, black, yellow members of religious orders orders—everyone was in clerical robes united under the church. It truly seems ideal.”
Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Jennifer Hamrick
“When two people have differing opinions, especially when the topic is sensitive and addresses the core of one's identity, being heard and understood is almost as valuable as changing the other person's mindset.”
Jennifer Hamrick, Once You See Racism: A Christian, White, Southern Woman’s Journey from Being Oblivious to Racism to Seeing it Clearly

Mouloud Benzadi
“NATIONALISM is another form of EXTREMISM”
Mouloud Benzadi

“As is so often the case, shapings of history designed to bring out lost sources of vitality call upon fictions of ethnicity or race as their medium.”
Christopher S. Wood, A History of Art History

Ibram X. Kendi
“White segregationist ideas suggest a racial group is permanently inferior, assimilationist ideas suggest a racial group is temporarily inferior.”
Ibram X. Kendi, How to Be an Antiracist

Ibram X. Kendi
“this double desire, this dueling consciousness, yielded an inner strife between Black pride and a yearning to be White.”
Ibram X. Kendi, How to Be an Antiracist

“I believe that we are all one family in Christ despite our ethnicity, but each of us as unique distinctions and gifts. That's how God desires us to live. To say we don't see color is to say we don't see the beauty of that diverse kingdom.”
Lecrae Moore, I Am Restored: How I Lost My Religion but Found My Faith

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