White Fragility Quotes

Quotes tagged as "white-fragility" Showing 1-14 of 14
Robin DiAngelo
“I was co-leading a workshop with an African American man. A white participant said to him, "I don't see race; I don't see you as black." My co-trainer's response was, "Then how will you see racism?" He then explained to her that he was black, he was confident that she could see this, and that his race meant that he had a very different experience in life than she did. If she were ever going to understand or challenge racism, she would need to acknowledge this difference. Pretending that she did not noticed that he was black was not helpful to him in any way, as it denied his reality - indeed, it refused his reality - and kept hers insular and unchallenged. This pretense that she did not notice his race assumed that he was "just like her," and in so doing, she projected her reality onto him. For example, I feel welcome at work so you must too; I have never felt that my race mattered, so you must feel that yours doesn't either. But of course, we do see the race of other people, and race holds deep social meaning for us.”
Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

Robin DiAngelo
“For those of us who work to raise the racial consciousness of whites, simply getting whites to acknowledge that our race gives us advantages is a major effort. The defensiveness, denial, and resistance are deep.”
Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

Mikki Kendall
“Politeness as filtered through fragility and supremacy isn't about manners; it's about a methodology of controlling the conversation.”
Mikki Kendall, Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot

Robin DiAngelo
“To continue reproducing racial inequality, the system only needs for white people to be really nice and carry on – to smile at people of color, to go to lunch with them on occasion. To be clear, being nice is generally a better policy than being mean. But niceness does not bring racism to the table and will not keep it on the table when so many of us who are white want it off. Niceness does not break with white solidarity and white silence. In fact, naming racism is often seen as not nice, triggering white fragility.”
Robin DiAngelo

“When you believe niceness disproves the presence of racism, it's easy to start believing bigotry is rare, and that the label racist should be applied only to mean-spirited, intentional acts of discrimination.”
Austin Channing Brown, I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness

Robin DiAngelo
“How can I say that if you are white, your opinions on racism are most likely ignorant, when I don't even know you? I can say so because nothing in mainstream US culture gives us the information we need to have the nuanced understanding of arguable the most complex and enduring social dynamic of the last several hundred years.”
Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

Robin DiAngelo
“Habitus maintains our social comfort and helps us regain it when those around us do not act in familiar and acceptable ways. .... Thus, white fragility is a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress in the habitus becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves. .... These behaviors, in turn, reinstate white racial equilibrium.”
Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

Robin DiAngelo
“I try to follow these guidelines:
1. How, where, and when you give me feedback is irrelevant - it is the feedback I want and need. Understanding that it is hard to give, I will take it any way I can get it. From my position of social, cultural, and institutional white power and privilege, I am perfectly safe and I can handle it. If I cannot handle it, it's on me to build my racial stamina.
2. Thank you.”
Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

Robin DiAngelo
“Interrupting racism takes courage and intentionality; the interruption is by definition not passive or complacent. So in answer to the question "Where do we go from here?," I offer that we must never consider ourselves finished with our learning.”
Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

“And still I urge you to struggle. Struggle for the memory of your ancestors. Struggle for wisdom. Struggle for the warmth of The Mecca. Struggle for your grandmother and grandfather, for your name. But do not struggle for the Dreamers. Hope for them. Pray for them, if you are so moved. But do not pin your struggle on their conversion. The Dreamers will have to learn to struggle themselves, to understand that the field for their Dream, the stage where they have painted themselves white, is the deathbed of us all.”
Ta-Nehesi Coates

Robin DiAngelo
“Highlighting my racial privilege invalidates the form of oppression that I experience (e.g., classism, sexism, heterosexism, ageism, ableism, transphobia.) We will then need to turn our attention to how you oppressed me.”
Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

“It is said that for every “Aha moment” that a white person experiences in regard to racism, a person of color has paid a tremendous emotional price. Yes, the lessons that we teach come at an extraordinarily high cost to us.”
Pocahontas Gertler, While I Run This Race

“Donald Trump is the President of poorly educated working class white males suffering from racial anxiety.”
Ranty McRanterson, Full Retard: The Dumbest Just Got Dumber

A.D. Aliwat
“White people usually get really excited when a person of color likes them at all.”
A.D. Aliwat, In Limbo