Cards Quotes

Quotes tagged as "cards" Showing 1-30 of 68
Lemony Snicket
“One of the world's most popular entertainments is a deck of cards, which contains thirteen each of four suits, highlighted by kings, queens and jacks, who are possibly the queen's younger, more attractive boyfriends.”
Lemony Snicket

Erik Pevernagie
“The moment the mirror does not recognize us anymore, the cards are no longer in our hands. In effect, we have failed to see to the bottom line of our life story and lost our identity. (“The empty Mirror")”
Erik Pevernagie

Jeannette Walls
“God deals us all different hands. How we play 'em is up to us.”
Jeannette Walls, Half Broke Horses

Dannika Dark
“Where did you meet?” he pressed on.
I shrugged and considered a little rephrasing. “I was out for a run.”
“From who?”
I leaned back to take a long, very long, slow sip of that beer.
Knox leaned forward. “I think we’re both bullsh*tting here, you ever play that card game?”
“With my grandma, every Sunday after church.”
Dannika Dark, Sterling

Ambrose Bierce
“Cribbage, n. A substitute for conversation among those to whom nature has denied ideas.”
Ambrose Bierce, The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary
tags: cards

Richard Kadrey
“The dead think they can get away with anything because you'll feel sorry for them. If you play cards with the dead, make sure you deal and don't let them buy you drinks. They'll slip you a formaldehyde roofie and pry the gold fillings out of your teeth.”
Richard Kadrey, Kill the Dead

Mallika  Nawal
“A good lawyer, just like a good poker player, must always keep his cards close to his chest.”
Mallika Nawal, I'm a Woman & I'm on SALE

Stephan Pastis
“Perhaps it is a secret yearning of all Hallmark employees to use the phrase 'you big fat pain in the butt' in an anniversary card.”
Stephan Pastis

Dan Brown
“Originally, Tarot had been devised as a secret means to pass along ideologies banned by the Church. Now, Tarot's mystical qualities were passed on by modern fortune-tellers.”
Dan Brown, The Da Vinci Code

“Their only chance to mix with royalty was while they played Bezique. They never played any other game but this one that had grown out of the French court: it was the game of the cavaliers, a game of waiting between battles.”
Lisa St. Aubin de Teran, Keepers of the House

Cynthia Voigt
“Your grandmother thought--no, she believed, it was like a faith for her. She believed it the way some people believe in God or science. She believed that it was the rules that made her life so easy. She thought life was about the rules people make for it, as if life was some kind of a board game and if you had a little luck, and you kept to the rules, you'd end up winning. Or maybe she thought it was like a game of solitaire and once the cards had been shuffled and laid out, if you had a good draw you were safe, as if it was arranged for you to win. Or to lose, although Grandmother considered herself someone who had won, since all she had to do once she was born was follow the rules. But really, life's like a game of bridge: You're dealt a hand and it can be a winning hand or a losing one, but that doesn't necessarily mean that you'll win or lose because there are other people at the table, your partner for one, and the other ream for another, that's three people...playing too, and people make mistakes, multiply that times three too, or you can just be smarter than they are. And luckier too, because anybody who sits down to play bridge or life without figuring out how much luck is involved is making a Big Mistake. I don't want you girls doing that.”
Cynthia Voigt, By Any Name

Lisa Kleypas
“Sara watched in awe. As agile as the dealers in the club were, she had never seen any of them handle cards with such ease. That, coupled with his extraordinary mind for numbers, would make him an invincible opponent. "Why don't you ever play?" she asked. "I've never seen you in a casual game with Lord Raiford or your other friends. Is it because you know you would always win?"
Derek shrugged. "That's one reason," he said without conceit. "The other is that I don't enjoy it."
"You don't?"
"I never did."
"But how can you be so good at something and not enjoy it?"
"Now there's a question," he said, and laughed softly, setting aside the cards. Leading her to the hazard table, he took her by the hips and lifted her up. She sat on the edge of the table, her knees pushed apart as he stood between them. Derek leaned forward, his mouth a warm, gentle brand. "It's not like your writing, sweet. When you sit at your desk, you put your heart and mind into your work, and it gives you satisfaction. But cards are just patterns. Once you learn the patterns, it's automatic. You can't enjoy something if it doesn't demand a little of your heart."
Sara caressed his black hair. "Do I have a little of your heart?”
Lisa Kleypas, Dreaming of You

Ernest Hemingway
“I don't know. I guess the cards we draw are those we get. You wouldn't like to re-deal would you, dealer?

No. They only deal to you once and then you pick them up and play them. I can play them, if I draw any damn thing at all...”
Ernest Hemingway, Across the River and into the Trees

Ehsan Sehgal
“When you play cards in the way of real love; you are defeated by yourself, you cannot blame anyone else, love does not hide identity when it exists. It lightens all sides, nowhere is darkness. It is the essence of true love.”
Ehsan Sehgal
tags: cards

Neil Simon
“OSCAR. (Sitting at table.) My friend Murray the Cop is right. Let's just play cards. And please hold them up, I can't see where I marked them.”
Neil Simon, The Odd Couple

Neil Simon
“OSCAR. Don't you know what's happening to the old gang? It's breaking up. Everyone's getting divorced....I swear, we used to have better games when we couldn't get out at night.”
Neil Simon, The Odd Couple

Joanne Harris
Never challenge Life to a game, my mother used to say to me. Because Life plays dirty, changes the rules, steals the cards right out of your hands or, sometimes, turns them all to blank―
Joanne Harris, Peaches for Father Francis

Ehsan Sehgal
“When you play cards in the way of real love, you are defeated by yourself; you cannot blame anyone else, love does not hide identity when it exists. It lightens all sides, nowhere is darkness. It is the essence of true love.”
Ehsan Sehgal
tags: cards

J.S. Mason
“He had been shuffled out so quickly he didn’t even realize what he was wearing, like a King of Spades who wanted to file a complaint to the playing card company manufacturer for not drawing him a garden tool like he specifically asked for.”
J.S. Mason, The Ghost Therapist...And Other Grand Delights

K.L. Harris
“Fate deals the cards that set the game and every player takes their place.
No soul can know what each hand holds, only time reveals such mysteries.
Each player lays their cards in turn, believing that they control their destiny, blind to the web that connects us all.
Every deed is not a single song, but alas, a single note in life’s symphony.”
K.L. Harris, Equillian's Key

K.L. Harris
“Fate deals the cards that set the game and every player takes their place.

No soul can know what each hand holds, only time reveals such mysteries.

Each player lays their cards in turn, believing that they control their destiny, blind to the web that connects us all.

Every deed is not a single song, but alas, a single note in life’s symphony.”
K.L. Harris, Equillian's Key

Kazuki Takahashi
“Atem: Out of the thousands of cards available, duelists build their decks by choosing cards they trust. But...cards also choose duelists! Card and duelist! When the two hearts are bound by trust...the card will display its true powers!”
Kazuki Takahashi, Yu-Gi-Oh! (3-in-1 Edition), Vol. 6: Includes Vols. 16, 17 18

Thomm Quackenbush
“You are responsible for what happened to you, but you are not to blame for it. You are trying to do the best you could with the hand you were dealt. You didn’t pick the cards.”
Thomm Quackenbush, Holidays with Bigfoot

“For all its modern glamour and for everything else that the Tarot has become, it had a fairly humble origin; it began as a simple pack of playing cards. No matter what use the Tarot is put to today, from psychological insight to divination to collectible folk art, it began and remains a card game. Trying to understand the Tarot without knowledge of this fact would be like trying to perform surgery without any knowledge of anatomy. In both cases, we end up with a mangled product.”
Ben Hoshour, Origins of the Minor Arcana: A Guidebook to the Ancestral Influences That Shaped the Tarot's Minor Arcana

“Flower’s evidentiary gymnastics beautifully illustrate the primary point I wish to make, which is that almost all of the Tarot’s acquired meaning has been derived from a foundation that has been shown to be lacking in both substance and truth. Furthermore, this pseudo-history has been promulgated ad infinitum from the late 18th century to the present day.”
Ben Hoshour, Origins of the Minor Arcana: A Guidebook to the Ancestral Influences That Shaped the Tarot's Minor Arcana

“Although Etteilla receives little credit in popular literature today, he can credited with many ‘firsts’': he was certainly the first to popularise fortune-telling with playing cards , the first to promote card reading as a professional activity and the first to publish books on the subject. He also was the first to use a pseudonym as a constant pen-name, initiating a tradition which was to flourish among XIX-oentury esoteric writers, as the following chapters will abundantly demonstrate. Thanks to Etteilla, Court de Gébelin's theory about the 'Egyptian' origin of the Tarot had a wider diffusion and fortune-telling with Tarot cards became popular. He was the first. too, to attempt to incorporate Tarot cards into a system of magical theory: his example, though not his means of doing so, was to be followed by others whose infuence has persisted longer.
Last but not least, he can be credited too with the invention of the very word cartomancie, or rather of its forerunner, ‘cartonomancie', which appeared in his writings from 1782. Amazingly, one of his disciples was about to publish a book on 'cartomancie' in 1789 (the first occurrence of such a word in a European language), but as the book is now lost we only know it from Etteilla's very critical review, rejecting this quite new and ‘illogical’ word to which he opposed his ‘better’ cartonomancie. Nevertheless, cartomancie took hold and its use spread. In 1803, it entered de Wailly’s French dictionary, and from these it has found its way into alnost all European languages,
Jean-Baptiste Alliette died on 12 December 1791. He was only 53, which is, even in the XVIII century, a rather young age at which to die, We unfortunately know nothing of what he died of. Etteilla was a fascinating character and deserves more than giving his name to a strange Tarot pack. There is something touching in the man, who was sincere and passionate, generous and enlightened (in all the meanings of the word in the late XVIII century.”
Ronald Decker, A Wicked Pack of Cards: The Origins of the Occult Tarot

“A game of cards insults all.”
Mantaranjot Mangat, Plotless
tags: cards

“Someone with a full deck is out there. Just have to make sure your cards are stacked correctly first.”
Christine E. Szymanski

Liz Braswell
“I'm not a card!" Alice cried, both to him and the skeleton.
The skeleton made a mocking little half bow. "Yet you look like you are trying to become a queen; you play in the Queens' Games.”
Liz Braswell, Unbirthday

“Don't think you're wasting time by things like playing solitaire--it's good therapy to give your brain a break now and then.”
Anna Balcsik

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