Canon Quotes

Quotes tagged as "canon" Showing 1-26 of 26
Harold Bloom
“Reading the very best writers—let us say Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, Tolstoy—is not going to make us better citizens. Art is perfectly useless, according to the sublime Oscar Wilde, who was right about everything. He also told us that all bad poetry is sincere. Had I the power to do so, I would command that these words be engraved above every gate at every university, so that each student might ponder the splendor of the insight.”
Harold Bloom, The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages

Harold Bloom
“Aesthetic value emanates from the struggle between texts: in the reader, in language, in the classroom, in arguments within a society. Aesthetic value rises out of memory, and so (as Nietzsche saw) out of pain, the pain of surrendering easier pleasures in favour of much more difficult ones ... successful literary works are achieved anxieties, not releases from anxieties.”
Harold Bloom, The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages

John  Adams
“The true source of our sufferings has been our timidity.

John Adams, The Portable John Adams

Harold Bloom
“Pragmatically, aesthetic value can be recognized or experienced, but it cannot be conveyed to those who are incapable of grasping its sensations and perceptions. To quarrel on its behalf is always a blunder.”
Harold Bloom

Kevin J. Vanhoozer
“Sola scriptura means at least this: that the church's proclamation is always subject to potential correction from the canon. It is for this reason that we resist simply collapsing the text into the tradition of its interpretation and performance.”
Kevin J. Vanhoozer, The Drama of Doctrine

Edmund Burke
“If ever we should find ourselves disposed not to admire those writers or artists, Livy and Virgil for instance, Raphael or Michael Angelo, whom all the learned had admired, [we ought] not to follow our own fancies, but to study them until we know how and what we ought to admire; and if we cannot arrive at this combination of admiration with knowledge, rather to believe that we are dull, than that the rest of the world has been imposed on.”
Edmund Burke, An Appeal from the New to the Old Whigs, in Consequence of Some Late Discussions in Parliament, Relative to the Reflections on the French Revolution.

Yevgeny Zamyatin
“The most effective way of destroying art is the canonization of one given form. And one philosophy.”
Yevgeny Zamyatin

“... frankly I'm not going to listen to someone hold forth on the Greatest Music of All Time if they start with the beatles. If they start with Mozart I'll have a little patience; because I know that Bach is better.”
Nathan "N.R." Gaddis
tags: canon

Marius Vieth
“The less gear you use, the more you grow as a photographer. Although there are fewer options available, you'll find more creative ways to capture what you feel! In a way, all your technical options before turn into creative solutions that improve your photography even more.”
Marius Vieth

R. Alan Woods
“Logos (The Biblical Manuscripts/Canon of Scriptures) & Rhema (The Person/Life/Words/Death/Resurrection of Jesus Christ): The 'special' & 'ultimate' revelation of God. Without these revelations God would be unsearchable, unknowable, and inscrutable."

~R. Alan Woods [2013]”
R. Alan Woods, The Journey Is the Destination: A Book of Quotes With Commentaries

Kate Zambreno
“And I *know* I wrote in the above that I hate biographies and reviews that focus on the psychological, surface detail, especially when they pertain to women writers, because I think it’s really about the cult of the personality, which is essentially problematic, and I think simplistically psychologizing which biographies are so wont to do is really problematic, and dangerous, especially when dealing with complicated women who just by being writers at a certain time and age were labelled as nonconformist, or worse, hysterical or ill or crazy, and I think branding these women as femme fatales is all so often done. And I know in a way I’m contributing to this by posting their bad-ass photos, except hopefully I am humanizing them and thinking of them as complicated selves and intellects AND CELEBRATING THEM AS WRITERS as opposed to straight-up objectifying. One particular review long ago in Poetry that really got my goat was when Brian Phillips used Gertrude Stein’s line about Djuna Barnes having nice ankles as an opener in a review of her poetry, and to my mind it was meant to be entirely dismissive, as of course, Stein was being as well. Stein was many important revolutionary things to literature, but a champion of her fellow women writers she was not. They published my letter, but then let the guy write a reply and scurry to the library and actually read Nightwood, one of my all-time, all-times, and Francis Bacon’s too, there’s another anecdote. And it’s burned in my brain his response, which was as dismissive and bourgeois as the review. I don’t remember the exact wordage, but he concluded by summing up that Djuna Barnes was a minor writer. Well, fuck a duck, as Henry Miller would say. And that is how the canon gets made.”
Kate Zambreno

“If we believe the Canon is closed and Scripture is sufficient, then we believe God is not speaking new words apart from Scripture.”
Dan Phillips

“Those who would argue for the infallibility or the inerrancy of scripture logically should also claim the same infallibility for the churches in the fourth and fifth centuries, whose decisions and historical circumstances left us with our present canon. This is apparently what would be required if we were to only acknowledge the twenty-seven NT books that were set forth by the church in that context. Was the church in the Nicene and post-Nicene eras infallible in its decisions or not?
(Formation of Christian Biblical Canon)”
Lee M. McDonald

R. Alan Woods
“The 'words' of Augustine, Origen, Clement of Alexandria, St. John of Damascus, St. Thomas Aquinas, et al, may not have carried the weight of Canon, however they were neither paper-like nor mere 'pellets'."

~R. Alan Woods [2012]”
R. Alan Woods, The Journey Is The Destination: A Photo Journal

Tim Parks
“The canon is finished. Anyone who believes that one can construct a canon from the tidal wave of narrative produced today is guilty of wishful thinking. All we will have is a record of who won the prizes and achieved celebrity status. But, perhaps, the canon was always a fairly heavy-handed tool and little more than a convenience. The only thing is to follow one’s nose and listen carefully to the way others talk about books, learn who’s opinion takes you to interesting places.”
Tim Parks
tags: canon

Philip Zaleski
“A very small class of books have nothing in common say that each admits us to a world of its own that seems to have been going on before we stumbled into it, but which, once found by the right reader, becomes indispensable to him.”
Philip Zaleski, The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings: J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Owen Barfield, Charles Williams

N.K. Jemisin
“I don’t know how I feel about a canon anymore ... The sheer volume of books that exist out there means that a canon is no longer possible.”
N.K. Jemisin
tags: canon

George Bernard Shaw
“Books are admitted to the canon by a compact which confesses their greatness in consideration of abrogating their meaning; so that the reverend rector can agree with the prophet Micah as to his inspired style without being committed to any complicity in Micah's furiously Radical opinions. Why, even I, as I force myself; pen in hand, into recognition and civility, find all the force of my onslaught destroyed by a simple policy of non-resistance. In vain do I redouble the violence of the language in which I proclaim my heterodoxies. I rail at the theistic credulity of Voltaire, the amoristic superstition of Shelley, the revival of tribal soothsaying and idolatrous rites which Huxley called Science and mistook for an advance on the Pentateuch, no less than at the welter of ecclesiastical and professional humbug which saves the face of the stupid system of violence and robbery which we call Law and Industry. Even atheists reproach me with infidelity and anarchists with nihilism because I cannot endure their moral tirades. And yet, instead of exclaiming "Send this inconceivable Satanist to the stake," the respectable newspapers pith me by announcing "another book by this brilliant and thoughtful writer." And the ordinary citizen, knowing that an author who is well spoken of by a respectable newspaper must be all right, reads me, as he reads Micah, with undisturbed edification from his own point of view. It is narrated that in the eighteen-seventies an old lady, a very devout Methodist, moved from Colchester to a house in the neighborhood of the City Road, in London, where, mistaking the Hall of Science for a chapel, she sat at the feet of Charles Bradlaugh for many years, entranced by his eloquence, without questioning his orthodoxy or moulting a feather of her faith. I fear I small be defrauded of my just martyrdom in the same way.”
George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman
tags: canon

Antonella Gambotto-Burke
“What's required of me in the field is to feel,' Stirton says with emphasis. 'And trying to take that feeling and put it in a form that communicates a particular set of emotions or circumstances - whether that involves depicting masculine pride, or a particular kind of suffering, or love, or closeness - my primary job is to feel and to try to put that feeling into some kind of visual form. My goal is to get to the heart of each story, you know? I’m trying to evolve in my work.”
Antonella Gambotto-Burke, Mouth

Pavel Florensky
“Художник, по невежествыу воображающий, будто без канонической формы он сотворит великое, подобен пешеходу, которому мешает, по его мнению, твердая почва и который мнит, что вися в воздухе, он ушел бы дальше, чем по земле. На самом же деле такой художник, отбросив форму совершенную, бессознательно хватается за обрывки и обломки тоже форм, но случайных и несовершенных, и к этим-то бессознательным реминисценциям притягивает эпитет «творчества».”
Pavel Florensky, Iconostasis

Pavel Florensky
“Между тем, истинный художник хочет не своего во что бы то ни стало, а прекрасного, объективно-прекрасного, то есть художественно воплощенной истины вещей, и вовсе не занят мелочным смаолюбивым вопросом, первым ли или сотым говорит он об истине. Лишь бы это была истина, - и тогда ценность происведения сама собою установится. Как всякий, кто живет, занят мыслью, живет ли он по правде или нет, а не тем, оказывается ли его жизнь похожей на жизнь соседа, - живет сам в себе для истины и убежден, что искренняя жизнь для истины непременно индивидуальна и в самой сути своей никак не повторима, истинной же может быть лишь в потоке всечеловеческой истории, а не как нарочито-выдумываемая - так не иначе и жизнь художественная: и художник, опираясь на всечеловеческие художественные каноны, когда таковые здесь или там найдены, чрез них и в них находит силу воплощать подлинно созерцаемую действительность и твердо знает, что дело его, если оно свободнои, не окажется удвоением чужого дела, хотя предмет беспокойства его - не это совподение с кем-то, а истинность изображенного им.”
Pavel Florensky, Iconostasis

Clement of Alexandria
“Nous avons un livre sur cette histoire, comme nous en avons également uu sur les Machabées. Durant cette captivité, Misaël, Ananias et Azarias ayant refusé d'adorer une statue, furent jetés dans une fournaise ardente, et sauvés des flammes par un ange qui descendit vers eux. Alors aussi, Daniel ayant été jeté dans la fosse aux lions, fut nourri par les mains d'Habacuc, par un miracle, et retiré sain et sauf de la fosse le septième jour. Ce fut alors aussi qu'un miracle fut fait en faveur de Jonas, et que Tobie, avec le secours de l'ange Raphaël, épousa Sara, dont les sept premiers prétendants avaient été tués par le démon; et que Tobie le père, après la célébration des noces, recouvra la vue.”
Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies

“Every act of reading is an act of forgetting: the experience of reading is a palimpsest, in which each text partially covers those that came before. Those books that allow us to forget the most are accorded he authority of the classic.”
James A. Secord, Victorian Sensation: The Extraordinary Publication, Reception, and Secret Authorship of Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation

Ursula K. Le Guin
“There was no correct text. There was no standard version. Of anything. There was not one Arbor but many, many arbors. The jungle was endless, and it was not one jungle but endless jungles, all burning with bright tigers of meaning, endless tigers. . . .”
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Telling

Andrea Dworkin
“I love the literature that these men created; but I will not live my life as if they are real and I am not. Nor will I tolerate the continuing assumption that they know more about women than we know about ourselves.”
Andrea Dworkin, Last Days at Hot Slit: The Radical Feminism of Andrea Dworkin

“The white masters, masters though they may be, are oblivious to those experiences of bigotry and exclusion that are condemnably common for the rest of us. In this essential matter, those writers of the literary canon are utterly ignorant, and so their reports on the human condition are gapingly incomplete. And still there are critics who argue that lyricism is a finished thing, that a white account of the self is a sufficiently universal contemplation, that any emphasis on race will only diminish its universality.”
Jaswinder Bolina, Of Color