Banquet Quotes

Quotes tagged as "banquet" (showing 1-7 of 7)
Frederick Buechner
“God is the comic shepherd who gets more of a kick out of that one lost sheep once he finds it again than out of the ninety and nine who had the good sense not to get lost in the first place. God is the eccentric host who, when the country-club crowd all turned out to have other things more important to do than come live it up with him, goes out into the skid rows and soup kitchens and charity wards and brings home a freak show. The man with no legs who sells shoelaces at the corner. The old woman in the moth-eaten fur coat who makes her daily rounds of the garbage cans. The old wino with his pint in a brown paper bag. The pusher, the whore, the village idiot who stands at the blinker light waving his hand as the cars go by. They are seated at the damask-laid table in the great hall. The candles are all lit and the champagne glasses filled. At a sign from the host, the musicians in their gallery strike up "Amazing Grace.”
Frederick Buechner, Telling the Truth: The Gospel as Tragedy, Comedy, and Fairy Tale

William Shakespeare
“Come, come, be every one officious
To make this banquet; which I wish may prove
More stern and bloody than the Centaurs' feast.”
William Shakespeare

Jonathan Grimwood
“The tastes of France are changing and we are the last of the banquet.”
Jonathan Grimwood, The Last Banquet

“Η πιθι 'η 'απιθι." ["Quaff or be off"]”
Anonymous

Anthony Liccione
“Life serves the food, and Death always shows up to the banquet, like an univited guest with nothing in hand to contribute, just to devour everything
then leave.”
Anthony Liccione

Bangambiki Habyarimana
“Some people sit at life’ banquet table while others serve them”
Bangambiki Habyarimana, Pearls Of Eternity

Kate Forsyth
“Huge tureens of puréed chestnut soup with truffles were carried in and served to each guest, filling the air with a rich earthy small. Then the servants brought in ballotine of pheasant, served with cold lobster in aspic and deep-sea oysters brought up the river by boat that morning. Our own foie gras on tiny rounds of bread was followed by 'margret de canard,' the breast meat of force-fed ducks, roasted with small home-grown pears and Armagnac. There was a white-bean cassoulet with wild hare, a haunch of venison cooked in cinnamon and wine, eel pie, and a salad of leaves and flowers from the garden, dressed in olive oil and lemon.”
Kate Forsyth, Bitter Greens