Growth Hacker Marketing Quotes

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Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising by Ryan Holiday
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Growth Hacker Marketing Quotes Showing 1-30 of 142
“The end goal of every growth hacker is to build a self-perpetuating marketing machine that reaches millions by itself.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“people [who are] thinking about things other than making the best product, never make the best product.”
Portfolio, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“... coding and technical chops are now an essential part of being a great marketer. Growth hackers are a hybrid of marketer and coder...”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“Some companies like Airbnb and Instragram spend a long time trying new iterations until they achieve what growth hackers call Product Market Fit (PMF);”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“Let’s be honest, a traditional marketer would not even be close to imagining the integration above—there’s too many technical details needed for it to happen. As a result, it could only have come out of the mind of an engineer tasked with the problem of acquiring more users from Craigslist.13”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“The old way—where product development and marketing were two distinct and separate processes—has been replaced.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“There must be a reason to share it and the means to do so.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“Marketing has always been about the same thing—who your customers are and where they are.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“First Google built a superior product. Then it built excitement by making it invite-only. And by steadily increasing the number of invites allowed to its existing user base, Gmail spread from person to person until it became the most popular, and in many ways the best, free e-mail service. Enormous”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“The end goal of every growth hacker is to build a self-perpetuating marketing machine that reaches millions by itself. —AARON GINN”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing
“A growth hacker is someone who has thrown out the playbook of traditional marketing and replaced it with only what is testable, trackable, and scalable. Their tools are e-mails, pay-per-click ads, blogs, and platform APIs instead of commercials, publicity, and money.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“Growth hackers are a hybrid of marketer and coder, one who looks at the traditional question of “How do I get customers for my product?” and answers with A/B tests, landing pages, viral factor, email deliverability, and Open Graph. . . .”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“how do you get, maintain, and multiply attention in a scalable and efficient way?”
Portfolio, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“Jonah Berger, a social scientist well-known for his studies of virality, explains that publicness is one of the most crucial factors in driving something’s spread. As he writes in his book Contagious, “Making things more observable makes them easier to imitate, which makes them more likely to become popular. . . . We need to design products and initiatives that advertise themselves and create behavioral residue that sticks around even after people have bought the product or espoused the idea.”
Portfolio, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“Patrick Vlaskovits, who was part of the initial conversation that the term “growth hacker” came out of, put it well: “The more innovative your product is, the more likely you will have to find new and novel ways to get at your customers.”12 For example: 1. You can create the aura of exclusivity with an invite-only feature (as Mailbox did). 2. You can create hundreds of fake profiles to make your service look more popular and active than it actually is—nothing draws a crowd like a crowd (as reddit did in its early days). 3. You can target a single service or platform and cater to it exclusively—essentially piggybacking off or even stealing someone else’s growth (as PayPal did with eBay). 4. You can launch for just a small group of people, own that market, and then move from host to host until your product spreads like a virus (which is what Facebook did by starting in colleges—first at Harvard—before taking on the rest of the population). 5. You can host cool events and drive your first users through the system manually (as Myspace, Yelp, and Udemy all did). 6. You can absolutely dominate the App Store because your product provides totally new features that everyone is dying for (which is what Instagram did—twenty-five thousand downloads on its first day—and later Snapchat). 7. You can bring on influential advisors and investors for their valuable audience and fame rather than their money (as About.me and Trippy did—a move that many start-ups have emulated). 8. You can set up a special sub-domain on your e-commerce site where a percentage of every purchase users make goes to a charity of their choice (which is what Amazon did with Smile.Amazon.com this year to great success, proving that even a successful company can find little growth hacks). 9. You can try to name a Planned Parenthood clinic after your client or pay D-list celebrities to say offensive things about themselves to get all sorts of publicity that promotes your book (OK, those stunts were mine).”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“You need the kind of objectivity that makes you forget everything you’ve heard, clear the table, and do a factual study like a scientist would. —STEVE”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“Eric Ries, author of The Lean Startup, explains that the best way to get to Product Market Fit is by starting with a “minimum viable product” and improving it based on feedback—as opposed to what most of us do, which is to try to launch publicly with what we think is our final, perfected product. Today,”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“The movie marketing paradigm says throw an expensive premiere and hope that translates into ticket sales come opening weekend. A growth hacker says, “Hey, it’s the twenty-first century, and we can be a lot more technical about how we acquire and capture new customers.” The start-up world is full of companies taking clever hacks to drive their first set of customers into their sales funnel. The necessity of that jolt—needing to get it any way they can—has made start-ups very creative.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“80 percent of marketers are unhappy with their ability to measure marketing return on investment (ROI). Not because the tools aren’t good enough, but because they’re too good, and marketers are seeing for the first time that their marketing strategies are “often flawed and their spending is inefficient.”4”
Portfolio, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“The company’s most effective marketing tactic (besides making a great product) would never have been conceived or attempted by a pure marketing team. Instead, the engineers coded a set of tools that made it possible for every member to seamlessly cross-post his or her Airbnb listing on craigslist (because craigslist does not technically “allow” this, it was a fairly ingenious work-around). As a result, Airbnb—a tiny site—suddenly had free distribution on one of the most popular websites in the world.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“With growth hacking, we begin by testing until we can be confident we have a product worth marketing. Only then do we chase the big bang that kick-starts our growth engine.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“In this case, it’s half strategy, half engineering. The combination is going to be different in every situation, but the point is that it’s always outside-the-box, even outside-the-budget. Today, as a marketer, our task isn’t necessarily to “build a brand” or even to maintain a preexisting one. We’re better off building an army of immensely loyal and passionate users. Which is easier to track, define, and grow? Which of these is real, and which is simply an idea? And when you get that right—a brand will come naturally.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“As Sean Ellis, one of the first growth hackers—he coined the term with Patrick Vlaskovits—puts it: “Focusing on customer acquisition over ‘awareness’ takes discipline. . . . At a certain scale, awareness/brand building makes sense. But for the first year or two it’s a total waste of money.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“The most insidious part of the traditional marketing model is that “big blowout launch” mythology. Of course, equally seductive is the “build it and they will come” assumption that too many people associate with the Web. Both are too simple and rarely effective. Remember what Aaron Swartz realized. Users have to be pulled in. A good idea is not enough. Your customers, in fact, have to be “acquired.” But the way to do that isn’t with a bombardment. It’s with a targeted offensive in the right places aimed at the right people. Your start-up is designed to be a growth engine—and at some point early on, that engine has to be kick-started. The good news is that we have to do that only once. Because the next step isn’t about getting more attention or publicity. The endless promotional cycle of traditional marketing is not our destiny. Because once we bring our first customers in, our next move is to set about turning them into an army.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“the real skill for marketers today isn’t going to be helping some big boring company grow 1 percent a year but to create a totally new brand from nothing using next to no resources.”
Portfolio, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“Anything and everything can be considered marketing—so long as it grows the business.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“WHAT IS GROWTH HACKING? The end goal of every growth hacker is to build a self-perpetuating marketing machine that reaches millions by itself. —AARON GINN”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“Aaron] had previously believed that if you came up with a great idea people would use it. But he realized now that you couldn’t expect people to come to you; you had to pull them in.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing
“You will find, as I did, that the definition of marketing is in desperate need of expansion.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising
“The thing about marketers—and, well, everyone—is that we’re wrong all the time. We think we make good gut decisions, but we don’t.”
Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising

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