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Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by Chip Heath
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Made to Stick Quotes (showing 1-30 of 123)
“The most basic way to get someone's attention is this: Break a pattern.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“Stephen Covey, in his book The 8th Habit, decribes a poll of 23,000 employees drawn from a number of companies and industries. He reports the poll's findings:

* Only 37 percent said they have a clear understanding of what their organization is trying to achieve and why
* Only one in five was enthusiastic about their team's and their organization's goals
* Only one in five said they had a clear "line of sight" between their tasks and their team's and organization's goals
* Only 15 percent felt that their organization fully enables them to execute key goals
* Only 20 percent fully trusted the organization they work for



Then, Covey superimposes a very human metaphor over the statistics. He says, "If, say, a soccer team had these same scores, only 4 of the 11 players on the field would know which goal is theirs. Only 2 of the 11 would care. Only 2 of the 11 would know what position they play and know exactly what they are supposed to do. And all but 2 players would, in some way, be competing against their own team members rather than the opponent.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“Anger prepares us to fight and fear prepares us to flee.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“To make our communications more effective, we need to shift our thinking from "What information do I need to convey?" to "What questions do I want my audience to ask?”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“The first problem of communication is getting people's attention.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“The Curse of Knowledge: when we are given knowledge, it is impossible to imagine what it's like to LACK that knowledge.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“If I already intuitively "get" what you're trying to tell me, why should I obsess about remembering it? The danger, of course, is that what sounds like common sense often isn't.... It's your job, as a communicator, to expose the parts of your message that are uncommon sense.
(p.72)”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“People tend to overuse any idea or concept that delivers an emotional kick.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“When you say three things, you say nothing.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“work to make the core message itself more interesting.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“Curiosity, he says, happens when we feel a gap in our knowledge.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“for creating a successful idea: a Simple Unexpected Concrete Credentialed Emotional Story.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“mental practice alone produced about two thirds of the benefits of actual physical practice”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“Feature creep is an innocent process. An engineer looking at a prototype of a remote control might think to herself, “Hey, there’s some extra real estate here on the face of the control. And there’s some extra capacity on the chip. Rather than let it go to waste, what if we give people the ability to toggle between the Julian and Gregorian calendars?”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“To make our communications more effective, we need to shift our thinking from “What information do I need to convey?” to “What questions do I want my audience to ask?”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“So, a good process for making your ideas stickier is: (1) Identify the central message you need to communicate—find the core; (2) Figure out what is counterintuitive about the message—i.e., What are the unexpected implications of your core message? Why isn’t it already happening naturally? (3) Communicate your message in a way that breaks your audience’s guessing machines along the critical, counterintuitive dimension. Then, once their guessing machines have failed, help them refine their machines.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“a secondary effect of being angry, which was recently discovered by researchers, is that we become more certain of our judgments. When we’re angry, we know we’re right, as anyone who has been in a relationship can attest.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“Lots of us have expertise in particular areas. Becoming an expert in something means that we become more and more fascinated by nuance and complexity. That’s when the Curse of Knowledge kicks in, and we start to forget what it’s like not to know what we know.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“Mystery is created not from an unexpected moment but from an unexpected journey. We know where we’re headed—we want to solve the mystery—but we’re not sure how we’ll get there.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“Nora Ephron is a screenwriter whose scripts for Silkwood, When Harry Met Sally, and Sleepless in Seattle have all been nominated for Academy Awards. Ephron started her career as a journalist for the New York Post and Esquire. She became a journalist because of her high school journalism teacher. Ephron still remembers the first day of her journalism class. Although the students had no journalism experience, they walked into their first class with a sense of what a journalist does: A journalists gets the facts and reports them. To get the facts, you track down the five Ws—who, what, where, when, and why. As students sat in front of their manual typewriters, Ephron’s teacher announced the first assignment. They would write the lead of a newspaper story. The teacher reeled off the facts: “Kenneth L. Peters, the principal of Beverly Hills High School, announced today that the entire high school faculty will travel to Sacramento next Thursday for a colloquium in new teaching methods. Among the speakers will be anthropologist Margaret Mead, college president Dr. Robert Maynard Hutchins, and California governor Edmund ‘Pat’ Brown.” The budding journalists sat at their typewriters and pecked away at the first lead of their careers. According to Ephron, she and most of the other students produced leads that reordered the facts and condensed them into a single sentence: “Governor Pat Brown, Margaret Mead, and Robert Maynard Hutchins will address the Beverly Hills High School faculty Thursday in Sacramento. . .blah, blah, blah.” The teacher collected the leads and scanned them rapidly. Then he laid them aside and paused for a moment. Finally, he said, “The lead to the story is ‘There will be no school next Thursday.’” “It was a breathtaking moment,” Ephron recalls. “In that instant I realized that journalism was not just about regurgitating the facts but about figuring out the point. It wasn’t enough to know the who, what, when, and where; you had to understand what it meant. And why it mattered.” For the rest of the year, she says, every assignment had a secret—a hidden point that the students had to figure out in order to produce a good story.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“When people know the desired destination, they’re free to improvise, as needed, in arriving there.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“Challenge plot, the Connection plot, and the Creativity plot.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“Statistics are rarely meaningful in and of themselves. Statistics will, and should, almost always be used to illustrate a relationship. It’s more important for people to remember the relationship than the number.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“A friend of a friend . . ." Have you ever noticed that our friends' friends have much more interesting lives than our friends themselves?”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“An accurate but useless idea is still useless.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“People are tempted to tell you everything, with perfect accuracy, right up front, when they should be giving you just enough info to be useful, then a little more, then a little more.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“The most basic way to make people care is to form an association between something they don’t yet care about and something they do care about. We”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“Stephen Covey, in his book The 8th Habit, describes a poll of 23,000 employees drawn from a number of companies and industries. He reports the poll’s findings: Only 37 percent said they have a clear understanding of what their organization is trying to achieve and why. Only one in five was enthusiastic about their team’s and their organization’s goals. Only one in five said they had a clear “line of sight” between their tasks and their team’s and organization’s goals. Only 15 percent felt that their organization fully enables them to execute key goals. Only 20 percent fully trusted the organization they work for.”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
“The story’s power, then, is twofold: It provides simulation (knowledge about how to act) and inspiration (motivation to act).”
Chip Heath, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die

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