Gregory

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You Don't Know JS...
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The Future of Jus...
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Apr 26, 2018 08:21PM

 
Thinking, Fast an...
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Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson
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Factfulness by Hans Rosling
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Gregory and 4 other people liked D.N.'s review of You Don't Know JS: Up & Going:
You Don't Know JS by Kyle Simpson
"Software is eating the world, the web is eating software, and JavaScript rules the web. The irony is that JavaScript (as of 2018) is still a vastly misunderstood programming language regarded in many quarters as a toy or kludge limited to handling..." Read more of this review »
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You Don't Know JS by Kyle Simpson
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The Whole Christ by Sinclair B. Ferguson
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Many excellent points individually, in audio form it was just a bit hard to follow for me. Definitely a bit more of a scholarly and less popular-level volume, which was both encouraging but seemed lacking in final clarity of point.
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Show Me the Numbers by Stephen Few
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The Stuff of Thought by Steven Pinker
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Illiberal Reformers by Thomas C. Leonard
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More of Gregory's books…
Leo Tolstoy
“Involuntarily it appeared to me that there, somewhere, was someone who amused himself by watching how I lived for thirty or forty years: learning, developing, maturing in body and mind, and how, having with matured mental powers reached the summit of life from which it all lay before me, I stood on that summit -- like an arch-fool -- seeing clearly that there is nothing in life, and that there has been and will be nothing. And he was amused... But whether that "someone" laughing at me existed or not, I was none the better off. I could give no reasonable meaning to any single action or to my whole life. I was only surprised that I could have avoided understanding this from the very beginning -- it has been so long known to all. Today or tomorrow sickness and death will come (they had come already) to those I love or to me; nothing will remain but stench and worms. Sooner or later my affairs, whatever they may be, will be forgotten, and I shall not exist. Then why go on making any effort?... How can man fail to see this? And how go on living? That is what is surprising! One can only live while one is intoxicated with life; as soon as one is sober it is impossible not to see that it is all a mere fraud and a stupid fraud! That is precisely what it is: there is nothing either amusing or witty about it, it is simply cruel and stupid.”
Leo Tolstoy, A Confession

C.S. Lewis
“In speaking of this desire for our own far off country, which we find in ourselves even now, I feel a certain shyness. I am almost committing an indecency. I am trying to rip open the inconsolable secret in each one of you—the secret which hurts so much that you take your revenge on it by calling it names like Nostalgia and Romanticism and Adolescence; the secret also which pierces with such sweetness that when, in very intimate conversation, the mention of it becomes imminent, we grow awkward and affect to laugh at ourselves; the secret we cannot hide and cannot tell, though we desire to do both. We cannot tell it because it is a desire for something that has never actually appeared in our experience. We cannot hide it because our experience is constantly suggesting it, and we betray ourselves like lovers at the mention of a name. Our commonest expedient is to call it beauty and behave as if that had settled the matter. Wordsworth’s expedient was to identify it with certain moments in his own past. But all this is a cheat. If Wordsworth had gone back to those moments in the past, he would not have found the thing itself, but only the reminder of it; what he remembered would turn out to be itself a remembering. The books or the music in which we thought the beauty was located will betray us if we trust to them; it was not in them, it only came through them, and what came through them was longing. These things—the beauty, the memory of our own past—are good images of what we really desire; but if they are mistaken for the thing itself they turn into dumb idols, breaking the hearts of their worshipers. For they are not the thing itself; they are only the scent of a flower we have not found, the echo of a tune we have not heard, news from a country we have never yet visited.”
C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

John Piper
“The really wonderful moments of joy in this world are not the moments of self-satisfaction, but self-forgetfulness. Standing on the edge of the Grand Canyon and contemplating your own greatness is pathological. At such moments we are made for a magnificent joy that comes from outside ourselves.”
John Piper, Don't Waste Your Life

C.S. Lewis
“All that is not eternal is eternally out of date.”
C.S. Lewis, The Four Loves

John Piper
“It is about the greatness of God, not the significance of man. God made man small and the universe big to say something about himself.”
John Piper, Don't Waste Your Life

79972 In Other Worlds Book Club — 343 members — last activity May 04, 2017 06:50AM
In Other Worlds is a science fiction & fantasy book club, hosted by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. We'll be reading and discussing new and classic titles, ...more
1990 The Inklings — 362 members — last activity Oct 13, 2016 06:38PM
The Inklings was an informal literary discussion group associated with the University of Oxford, England, between the 1930s and the 1960s. Its most re ...more
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