Erin

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Becoming a Writer by Dorothea Brande
"Four stars for content, and the fifth star for renewal of hope."
Becoming a Writer by Dorothea Brande
"I read this classic, first published in 1934, thinking it might be able to help me write well. Instead, it merely showed me why I am not a writer. Why I cannot be a writer. Why I've stopped writing reviews here at goodreads and why I have plenty o..." Read more of this review »
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The Green Glass Sea by Ellen Klages
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Erin has completed the 2017 Reading Challenge
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Erin has completed her goal of reading 20 books for the 2017 Reading Challenge!
 
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The Examined Life by Stephen Grosz
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Written as a series of vignettes inspired by his life as a psychologist, the pace of this book, the constantly changing subjects, and the difficulties faced by his patients made for good reading. I get the feeling everyone working in any profession l ...more
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The Wives of Los Alamos by TaraShea Nesbit
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I have no idea what I would make of this book if I didn't live in Los Alamos, but it was interesting given our connection to the lab.
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Mindfulness by Mark         Williams
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Buddhist Boot Camp by Timber Hawkeye
Buddhist Boot Camp
by Timber Hawkeye (Goodreads Author)
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Annoying. I don't know what I was expecting, but as I read I was constantly judging this guy and his writing, which really seemed to defeat whatever purpose I originally had when I started reading.
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What the Buddha Taught by Walpola Rahula
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This is very, very accessible. The intro even lays out what chapters are most useful if you know nothing, and suggests you read this first/exclusively.
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The Taliban Shuffle by Kim Barker
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Although the author seems to have gotten a lot of flak about this being more about her than anything else, but that's what I liked about it. The writing was enjoyable, her adventures outrageous, harrowing, interesting and boring, and her anecdotes re ...more
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“Here are some of the remedios, and what they were used for by the old curanderas.
For calentura (fever), for de sauco (elderberry) flowers were placed in a jar of water, and soaked for twenty-four hours, then strained through a cloth, and the water given to the sick one. This was used either fresh or dry.
Polvos de coyote is like a small tomato bush. In the spring it has a white flower, later a small green berry, which looks like a tiny tomato, about the size of a small marble. In the fall this berry dries up into a pod, and inside this is a grey powder. This powder was blown into the ears to cure sordera (deafness). The reason for its name, polvo de coyote, is that it grows on the mesa, where the coyotes roam.
Yerba de la golondrina (swallow's herb) was used as an inguente (salve). This yerba was picked green and hung up to dry. When dry, it was ground into a powder and mixed with sheep tallow for a salve. It was used for wounds, cuts, and sores. Yerba de la golondrina, or swallow's herb, grows close to the ground and has small round leaves, and looks like a small fern. The reason for the name is that the swallows eat the leaves of this yerba.
Yerba de la golondrina grows only in the southern part of the state.”
Work Projects Administration, Women's Tales from the New Mexico WPA: La Diabla a Pie

Robert Whitaker
“This new marketplace for drugs proved profitable for all involved. Drug industry revenues topped $1 billion in 1957, the pharmaceutical companies enjoying earnings that made them “the darlings of Wall Street,” one writer observed.19 Now that physicians controlled access to antibiotics and all other prescription drugs, their incomes began to climb rapidly, doubling from 1950 to 1970 (after adjusting for inflation). The AMA’s revenues from drug advertisements in its journals rose from $2.5 million in 1950 to $10 million in 1960, and not surprisingly, these advertisements painted a rosy picture. A 1959 review of drugs in six major medical journals found that 89 percent of the ads provided no information about the drugs’ side effects.20”
Robert Whitaker, Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America

Robert Whitaker
“In 1967, one in three American adults filled a prescription for a “psychoactive” medication, with total sales of such drugs reaching $692 million.”
Robert Whitaker, Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America

Robert Whitaker
“Wallace Laboratories hired Salvador Dalí to help stoke Miltown fever, paying the great artist $35,000 to create an exhibit at an AMA convention that was meant to capture the magic of this new drug.”
Robert Whitaker, Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America

“Like the photographs, the stories people told were full of such significant details, and perhaps the interviewers were told to keep their eyes on those details. Thus, Annette Hersh Thorp would describe the interiors of the houses in her narratives, and Lou Sage Batchen would inscribe every detail of a remedio (herbal remedy) and its use. In her book The Preservation of the Village: New Mexico's Hispanics and the New Deal, Suzanne Forrest claims that the New Deal was a cultural invasion far more pervasive than anything Hispanic New Mexicans had yet experienced. She believes that the interviewers romanticized the work and culture of the rural villages and "cleaned up" the Mexican heritage. In so doing, they invented a romantic Spanish heritage for the state. This was the beginning of a "Spanish" revival, the creation of a "utopic" arcadia of Hispanic village culture.”
Work Projects Administration, Women's Tales from the New Mexico WPA: La Diabla a Pie

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