Chicks On Lit discussion

315 views
Group Read Book Discussions > Atlas Shrugged *chunky read*

Comments Showing 1-50 of 563 (563 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

message 1: by Meg (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments Reading Schedule

July 18 - Discuss Chapters 1-6 read Chapters 7-10
July 25 - Discuss Chapters 7-10 read Part Two Chapters 1-3
August 1 - Discuss Chapters 1-3 read Chapters 4-7
August 8 - Discuss Chapters 4-7 read Chapters 8-10
August 15 - Discuss Chapters 8-10 Part Three read Chapters 1-3
August 22 - Discuss Chapters 1-3 Read Chapters 4-6
August 29 - Discuss Chapters 4-6 Read Chapters 7-8
September 5 - Discuss Chapters 7-8 Finish Book
September 12 Discuss book pick next chunky

Hope you can all read with us, enjoy the next few weeks
My new copy just arrived!


message 2: by Sheila , Supporting Chick (new)

Sheila  | 3485 comments Mod
I'm looking forward to joining in Meg. I've had a copy sitting on my shelf for quite awhile, and this is just the motivation I needed to read it. Thank you for posting the schedule. :o)


message 3: by Marialyce (new)

Marialyce Me too, Meg. I have it on reserve at the library.


message 4: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 1445 comments Does anyone have a copy that doesn't have teensy print? If so, can you tell me who the publisher is?


Elizabeth (Alaska) Laura wrote: "Does anyone have a copy that doesn't have teensy print? If so, can you tell me who the publisher is?"

Laura, you can get it on kindle. Even if you don't have a Kindle, you can download a free PC version. I would think you could then adjust the size of the type to suit your needs. Perhaps someone else can confirm this.


message 6: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Looks like we have some new people joining. This is wonderful to see. Thanks Tera and Meg for all your hard work. I heart the chunky group.


Jayme(the ghost reader) (JaymeILtheghostreader) | 4711 comments okay this is an insanely long book.


message 8: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 1445 comments Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: "Laura wrote: "Does anyone have a copy that doesn't have teensy print? If so, can you tell me who the publisher is?"

Laura, you can get it on kindle. Even if you don't have a Kindle, you can dow..."


Thanks Elizabeth, but I do want to read the book, not be chained to my computer to read it. I appreciate the idea tho.


Elizabeth (Alaska) I don't blame you Laura. I'm not ready for electronic books, may never be. I just thought it an option. Will keep my eyes (and ears) open for you.


message 10: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 1445 comments Thanks! My library's got the paperback, which is a couple of inches thick, and the print is veeery small. I could do it probably for a couple of hundred pages, but after that, I'm not so sure.


message 11: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 1445 comments Wow! My library has this on downloadable audiobook - and CD book! 55 and a half hours....WOAH! But that could definitely help!


message 12: by Tera, First Chick (new)

Tera | 2530 comments Mod
I think a large print version of this book would require a consumer warning for lifting with your legs not back and/or requiring a back brace while handling


message 13: by Laura (new)

Laura (apenandzen) | 1445 comments I'm not looking for large print, but the copy I saw was the smallest print I've ever seen in a book. Maybe the book / audio / back to book thing would work.


message 14: by Britt☮ (new)

Britt☮ (genki_bee) Oh, yikes. $18.99 for the Kindle version? That's absolutely ridiculous!


Jayme(the ghost reader) (JaymeILtheghostreader) | 4711 comments Tera wrote: "I think a large print version of this book would require a consumer warning for lifting with your legs not back and/or requiring a back brace while handling"

hahahaha, that's funny Tera :)


message 16: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca LoL Tera. I was thinking maybe I could to arm curls with it for my workout.


message 17: by Meg (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments I am very excited that there is so much interest in this chunky. this will be really fun, we do it slow and before you know it you are done!


message 18: by Lori (new)

Lori Walker | 617 comments I am reading this book with the group come hell or high water. I loved The Fountainhead and have heard that this is the book Rand wanted The Fountainhead to be. I'm in the process of rereading The Fountainhead so that I can compare the two.


message 19: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany | 92 comments Britt☮ wrote: "Oh, yikes. $18.99 for the Kindle version? That's absolutely ridiculous!"

Yes! The sony price is the same. I even tried books on board and fictionwise and there was no difference. I may have to see if an online library has it!


message 20: by Anna (new)

Anna | 19 comments Just ordered it from the library. Looking forward to reading it with everyone.


message 21: by Sheila , Supporting Chick (new)

Sheila  | 3485 comments Mod
For anyone still looking for a copy of Atlas Shrugged, there is a copy available here on Goodreads Bookswap, where you just have to pay the postage for shipping.


message 22: by AJ (new)

AJ (Anersword) | 121 comments Hi there, how do you choose the chunky read? I've never seen any polls for it.


message 23: by Meg (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments Thanks for that information Anna, if anyone still needs a copy.

We do have polls for our reads. Sometimes if the polls are close we just do the runner up next. Why? Do you have a request? We haven't picked one for after Atlas Shrugged.


message 24: by Stacie (new)

Stacie | 32 comments Very excited to read Atlas Shrugged. I adored The Fountainhead as a teen but never got around to this one.

I do have a suggestion for a future Chunky: David Copperfield. I love Dickens but never have been able to get through this monster on my own.


message 25: by Marialyce (new)

Marialyce ... or perhaps The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins


Elizabeth (Alaska) Atlas Shrugged will be good because it is more than just a good story. Having read both David Copperfield and The Woman in White, I would hope we would pick something that could offer more discussion.


message 27: by Sheila , Supporting Chick (new)

Sheila  | 3485 comments Mod
Do you have a list of all the books you have done so far? I'm pretty sure you did War and Peace. That is one chunky I've had on my shelf, but I think you did it already.

Another possible chunky is Ulysses, by James Joyce.


message 28: by Meg (last edited Jun 22, 2010 07:29AM) (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments So far we have done:

War and Peace
East of Eden
Vanity Fair
Middlemarch
Cloudsplitter
The Count of Monte Cristo

I don't think I have forgotten any?


message 29: by Sheila , Supporting Chick (new)

Sheila  | 3485 comments Mod
Was East of Eden a chunky read? I remember reading it here on COL, but don't remember if it was a regular read, or a chunky,


Elizabeth (Alaska) I would love to see us read The Forsyte Saga.


message 31: by Marialyce (new)

Marialyce Well, I for one am looking forward to Atlas Shrugged. Thank you Meg!


message 32: by Lori (new)

Lori Walker | 617 comments I'll second The Forsyte Saga since I recently bought it.


message 33: by Sheila , Supporting Chick (new)

Sheila  | 3485 comments Mod
I'm very much looking forward to Atlas Shrugge too! I've got the schedule written on a post-it note right by my computer so I don't forget, and have the book ready and at the top of my to-read pile of books. :o)

So, double thank you to Meg for helping us all tackle these "chunkies".


message 34: by Meg (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments I am so happy that you are all planning on joining in.

I hope everyone has the book by our start date!


message 35: by AJ (new)

AJ (Anersword) | 121 comments Meg wrote: "Thanks for that information Anna, if anyone still needs a copy.

We do have polls for our reads. Sometimes if the polls are close we just do the runner up next. Why? Do you have a request? We h..."


Nope, just curious on how they were picked!


message 36: by AJ (new)

AJ (Anersword) | 121 comments Actually I just thought of one: The Pillars of the Earth - I haven't read it but everyone who has recommends it.


message 37: by Meg (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments I have read Pillars and its sequel, totally awesome books!


message 38: by Meg (last edited Jun 22, 2010 07:30AM) (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments Yes we also read East of Eden and the Count of Monte Cristo, which I add to the above list.


message 39: by Meg (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments Some background googled information:


Twentieth-century culture spawned the most oppressive dictatorships in human history. The Fascists in Italy, the National Socialists (Nazis) in Germany, and the Communists — first in Russia and later in China and elsewhere — seriously threatened individual freedom throughout the world. Ayn Rand lived through the heart of this terrifying historical period. In fact, when she started writing Atlas Shrugged in 1946, the West had just achieved victory over the Nazis. For years, the specter of national socialism had haunted the world, exterminating millions of innocent people, enslaving millions more, and threatening the freedom of the entire globe. The triumph of the free countries of the West over Naziism was achieved at an enormous cost in human life. However, it left the threat of communism unabated.

Ayn Rand was born in Russia in 1905 and witnessed firsthand the Bolshevik Revolution, the Communist conquest of Russia, and the political oppression that followed. Even after her escape from the Soviet Union and her safe arrival in the United States, she kept in close touch with family members who remained there. But when the murderous policies of Joseph Stalin swallowed the Soviet Union, she lost track of her family. From her own life experiences, Ayn Rand knew the brutal oppression of Communist tyranny.

During the last days of World War II and in the years immediately following, communism conquered large portions of the world. Soviet armies first rolled through the countries of Eastern Europe, setting up Russian "satellite" nations in East Germany, Poland, Hungary, Romania, and elsewhere. Communists then came to power in China and North Korea and launched an invasion of South Korea. Shortly thereafter, communism was also dominant in Cuba, on America's doorstep. In the 1940s and 1950s, communism was an expanding military power, threatening to engulf the free world.


message 40: by Meg (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments This time period was the height of the Cold War — the ideological battle between the United States and the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union ruled its empire in Eastern Europe by means of terror, brutally suppressing an uprising by Hungarian freedom fighters in 1956. The Russians developed the atomic bomb and amassed huge armies in Eastern Europe, threatening the free nations of the West. Speaking at the United Nations, Soviet dictator Nikita Khrushchev vowed that communism would "bury" the West. Like the Nazis in the 1930s, communists stood for a collectivist political system: one in which an individual is morally obliged to sacrifice himself for the state. Intellectual freedom and individual rights, cherished in the United States and other Western countries, were in grave danger.

Foreign military power was not the only way in which communism threatened U.S. freedom. Collectivism was an increasingly popular political philosophy among American intellectuals and politicians. In the 1930s, both national socialism and communism had supporters among American thinkers, businessmen, politicians, and labor leaders. The full horror of Naziism was revealed during World War II, and support for national socialism dwindled in the United States as a result. But communism, in the form of Marxist political ideology, survived World War II in the United States. Many American professors, writers, journalists, and politicians continued to advocate Marxist principles. When Ayn Rand was writing Atlas Shrugged, many Americans strongly believed that the government should have the power to coercively redistribute income and to regulate private industry. The capitalist system of political and economic freedom was consistently attacked by socialists and welfare statists. The belief that an individual has a right to live his own life was replaced, to a significant extent, by the collectivist idea that individuals must work and live in service to other people. Individual rights and political freedom were threatened in American politics, education, and culture.


message 41: by Marialyce (last edited Jun 22, 2010 04:11AM) (new)

Marialyce "...many Americans strongly believed that the government should have the power to coercively redistribute income and to regulate private industry".... I think perhaps here, history is trying to repeat itself.

I am old enough to remember the fear we had as kids of communism and the bomb. We had bomb drills in school in which we hid under our desks (as if that would have protected us!) It was scary and frightening for us as children.


message 42: by Meg (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments I guess we are in the same age group because I remember those times as well. I did read this and think, hmmmmmmmmmmm sounds familiar


message 43: by Nancy (last edited Jun 23, 2010 04:18AM) (new)

Nancy | 1243 comments I was also thinking this sounds very familiar. Marialyce I remember 'bomb drills' too, except we were timed as to how fast it took us to get home. And anyone who couldn't do it in X amount of time was retained at school I guess. Of course some neighbors had bomb shelters in their basements stocked with supplies. We didn't have anything but perhaps a walk-in closet. Dad figured we'd be toast anyway. My kids just roll their eyes at these stories. How naive we were then as to destructive power of radiation!


message 44: by Marialyce (last edited Jun 23, 2010 04:37AM) (new)

Marialyce Hi Meg and Nancy,

Wow! I am so jealous, you got to go home on your bomb drills. We had to stay in school hiding and not talking at all during the drill. I do know that after 9/11 we had to have "evacuation" drills in school. (I was a teacher then!) NY State requires you have three a year. Of course my school evacuated at 3:05 (regular dismissal was at 3:30 and we had to stay until then) Don't let those teachers have five extra minutes.

I picked up Atlas Shrugged yesterday at the library. I also got a very strong pair of dollar store reading glasses. That print is minuscule for sure. I was surprised to see it is a Young Adult book. At any rate, it looks fascinating. So looking forward to reading and discussing it.


message 45: by Nancy (new)

Nancy | 1243 comments Marialyce - Laughing about your five mintue comment - I'm a teacher too. The only kind of drill we are required to do is a fire drill once a month and a tornado drill (OF COURSE!) in the spring. We have also done lock-down drills, but the evaculation plan hasn't been 'refreshed' or rehearsed since early post 9/11 days.


message 46: by Marialyce (new)

Marialyce My husband always says put two teachers in a room (or on the internet) they could talk forever. I am sure we could compare notes on the "humane" treatment of teachers.


message 47: by Meg (new)

Meg (megvt) | 3069 comments Ha ha I can join that discussion too!


message 48: by Marialyce (new)

Marialyce Meg wrote: "Ha ha I can join that discussion too!"

Absolutely, Meg!


message 49: by Nancy (last edited Jun 23, 2010 10:24PM) (new)

Nancy | 1243 comments I'm hearin' ya! I would just like time to go to the bathroom. It has seriously not been a good thing in my case to refrain from drinking water during the day because there is no time (and my control aint what it used to be!). Then I make up for it in the evening and am up and down at night. Of course that's probably half an age thing. I used to be good at this!


message 50: by Marialyce (new)

Marialyce Nancy.. shame on you teachers should not need to go to the bathroom after all you can go on your 30 minute lunch if your principal hasn't called you in for some inane thing or you MUST return a parent phone call.


« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
back to top