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Feeling Nostalgic? The archives > Your next/current read?

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message 1: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (Jez476) | 664 comments Lately, I've been so indecisive when I'm trying to pick my next book. Last night I spent half an hour staring at my bookcase until I finally picked something. I do like to read something light after something heavy.

How do you choose the next book you read?


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

Typically I choose what ever is available. If I have a book checked out from the Library, it definitely gets first choice, as I like to get it back before it is due. Then comes books that are lent to me. I try to get them back to whomever I borrowed them from. Then whatever I may have lying around. I will definitely try to go lighter after a heavy book, and no more than two heavy books in a row.


message 3: by David (new)

David (BowserTheTurtle) yesterday i got Tuesdays with Morrie An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson and The Acid House.. i intend to read sometime next week after packing.. i wanted Tuesdays with Morrie because i heard it was a good story and it was about someone who has ALS.. the acid house i got because i wanted to read something by the author but didn't know what to get so i just picked that one, and if i like it ill read more from him.. sometimes ill get to know an authors style at least a little bit to get interested in what to read, unless its a topic that i am interested in to begin with.. sometimes ill read stuff that friends recommend as well as i share tastes in books with those who do read a lot..


message 4: by Lori (new)

Lori Jaime, I too like to mix up heavy with light. One way I choose is by reading reviews - that's how I discovered GR to begin with. This gives me great insight into not only the plot (or lack of), but the mood of the book. If there are a few books in from my library holds list, I start with those. And if more than one appeal to me then I read the first page of each. Often I become engrossed and find myself already on pg 5, which is my answer!


message 5: by Sarah (last edited Nov 23, 2009 12:01PM) (new)

Sarah | 13813 comments I was talking with a friend before the concert the other night; I had seen a Peter S. Beagle collection in her bag, and said that was not what I expected to see her reading. She says she takes the bus to work, and that makes her read a lot of short stories, since they're perfect for the ride downtown. She goes to the library and looks for the S on the spine of the book that suggests a collection of short stories. Then she flips it randomly open to a page, and if she likes that page, she'll take the book and start from the beginning. I thought that was interesting.

My next book, when I finally finish my crazy writing month? I was going to reward myself with Catching Fire. I'd prefer the e-copy, so I don't have to haul a hardcover to Africa. However, it appears that it hasn't come out in an electronic version yet, so I'm torn about waiting til I get back vs. carrying the big book.


ETA: Oh frabjous day! The library copy I requested back in August is due to arrive tomorrow. I'll just have to read it quickly before I leave.


message 6: by Angie (new)

Angie (angabel) I usually have around 10 or 20 books in my possession to read, but I chalk my next read up to my mood, the barometric pressure, what I've read previously. Picking what to read next is nothing short of a spiritual experience for me.


message 7: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (KSprink) | 11469 comments i am going to read superfreakonomics by steven levitt. i am ready for a more intelligent read and i loved the first one. i also am ready for another malcom gladwell book


message 8: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (KSprink) | 11469 comments i usually read a non-fiction more intellectual read and then a quick-read fiction novel and then rotate.


message 9: by Misha (new)

Misha (ninthwanderer) I'm usually juggling several "currently reading" books at once, and which one I'm reading at a given moment depends on my mood. If I ever get through Gravity's Rainbow then I might pick up Against the Day next, unless something else shiny crosses my field of vision first.


message 10: by Mary JL (new)

Mary JL (MaryJL) | 250 comments I Mix heavy and light reads. I also rotate genres. After reading three or four SF novels, I usually try some history or mystery for a change of pace.

Of course, this system is always subject to change if I am at the bookstore and something jumps off the rack and screams "BUY ME."

It's really hard to go to the bookstore--almost everything looks so good.


message 11: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13813 comments I find the hardest part isn't choosing the next book - that tends to be a whim, dictated by the previous book to some extent, and also the weather, my mood, etc, as others have said.

The harder part is deciding what to bring on vacation, when I'll be locked into my choices! I'm downloading a few spares onto my ipod, but I think I can only get away with dragging a paperback or two -preferably ones I can leave.


message 12: by Gus (new)

Gus Sanchez (GusSanchez) Misha, following Gravity's Rainbow with Against the Day is an act of reckless bravery. You can do it. Both books will reveal great literary treasures...seriously.

I tend to read 2-3 books at a time. Right now, I'm reading:

All Hopped Up and Ready to Go: Music From the Streets of New York 1927-1977 by Tony Fletcher - the title says it all, and it's a thrilling, exhaustively researched study; a must-read for music lovers.

Downtown Owl: A Novel by Chuck Klosterman - Chuck's first novel, and it's pretty good so far. He's demonstrating a firm grasp for prose. Better than I anticipated.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick - I've seen Blade Runner approximately 20 times, yet I've never read the novel from which the film is based on. I've also never read Philip K. Dick. I'm rectifying both right now.

As for what's next, I'm staring at a slew of books that someday I'm hoping to finish. For example:

- House of Leaves by Mark Danielewski
- And the Ass Saw the Angel by Nick Cave (yes, that Nick Cave)
- The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz
- The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
- Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy (reading it again)
- Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie
- Collected Fictions by Jorge Luis Borges
- Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
- The Rising by Brian Keene

...and so on and so on...


message 13: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13813 comments Midnight's Children is on my list of things that I'd like to read sooner rather than later.


message 14: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments
The harder part is deciding what to bring on vacation, when I'll be locked into my choices! I'm downloading a few spares onto my ipod, but I think I can only get away with dragging a paperback or two -preferably ones I can leave.

Eek. That's pressure.

I tend to let the books find me, if that makes sense...isn't it weird how the right book finds you at the right time more often than not? Although I did recently have a spell when I started the Ellroy to which I was looking forward and just wasn't in the mood. That threw me off.

Nick Cave's got a new one out, too, Gus...I've got to get around to reading House of Leaves...


message 15: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13813 comments I think Nick Cave's earlier book got better reviews than his new one.


message 16: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments Yeah, the first one was better, no doubt...


message 17: by Gus (new)

Gus Sanchez (GusSanchez) Yes, I know about Mr. Cave's new novel. I probably won't read it until I've read his first one.


Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments I let books find me, too. I bring only a paperback and some newspapers with me on vacations, because I know I'll be visiting a bookstore or two, and I'll want to read whatever I find there.

And I never force myself to read a classic. I'll know when it's the right time to read one, because it'll all of a sudden sound like just what I want to read.


message 19: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13813 comments Sounds like a smart system. I always carry books with me AND go to bookstores, and carry everything home again. This was the first time I was considering taking books that I would deliberately set free if I finished.

Do you know I've never seen a bookstore in South Africa? I'm sure they're out there, but I haven't come across one. I don't even remember seeing one in the giant mall with the wave pool for surfing competitions.




message 20: by Angie (new)

Angie (angabel) Sarah Pi wrote: "Do you know I've never seen a bookstore in South Africa? I'm sure they're out there, but I haven't come across one. I don't even remember seeing one in the giant mall with the wave pool for surfing competitions."

Maybe that should be your mission this time, if you have time! Gosh, bookstores just about killed me when I was in India. Next time I'm planning on stocking up and shipping a bunch back. The only thing that really saddened me was that the bookstores in the big malls (both in and out of the touristy areas) didn't really have any books written in Hindi, I guess attesting to the effect of colonization. :(

I got a really beat-up former library copy through bookmooch of The Inheritance of Loss and I'm tempted to read that next. I don't know why, but if I get a beat-up copy of something, I tend to push it to the top of the to-read pile.



message 21: by Peanut (new)

Peanut | 35 comments I am currently reading a book called Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. The person took Jane Austin's book and put zombies in it. I'm not sure if I like it or not yet.


message 22: by Gus (new)

Gus Sanchez (GusSanchez) Peanut, I just finished reading that one. I liked the premise, but overall the gimmick wore pretty thin. And I love all things zombie.


Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments I liked the Austen parts, but didn't think they did enough with the zombies. I never felt that our heroine was truly in danger.
Much wasted potential in that book, Peanut.


message 24: by Angie (new)

Angie (angabel) Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters by Ben H. Winters

Have you guys seen this?

Maybe I should get crackin' on The Old Man and the Sea and Aliens.


message 25: by Mary JL (new)

Mary JL (MaryJL) | 250 comments Looks like this might be starting a trend. Classic lovers, beware!


message 26: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (Jez476) | 664 comments I've been so on the fence about reading Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. I just don't know about that one but I've heard the same opinions as Gus and Jackie: great potential but they don't do enough with the Zombies. ::jumps off the fence::

Gus, my only suggestion in reading House of Leaves is be patient, it's worth it. And one other thing: don't read it at the same time you're moving into a new house.


message 27: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (Jez476) | 664 comments By the way, I started reading The Town That Forgot How to Breathe A Novel and I'm at the point that I'm going to start reading something light at night before I go to bed. It's getting creepy. So, I'm starting Watership Down tonight. :-)


message 28: by Gus (new)

Gus Sanchez (GusSanchez) The same guy that co-opted wrote >Pride and Prejudice and Zombies is now busy with Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Interesting.

Jaimie, thanks for the advice. I figure if I could endure Thomas Pynchon's literary gymnastics, I could handle House of Leaves. All I need is to set aside a good chunk of time to read it and give it the attention it merits.


message 29: by Youndyc (new)

Youndyc | 1256 comments Angie wrote: "Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters by Ben H. Winters

Have you guys seen this?

Maybe I should get crackin' on The Old Man and the Sea and Aliens."



ANYTHING would be an improvement on Old Man and the Sea!



message 30: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (Jez476) | 664 comments Gus wrote: "The same guy that co-opted wrote >Pride and Prejudice and Zombies is now busy with Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Interesting.

Jaimie, thanks for the advice. I figure if I could endure Thomas Py..."


4 stakes and 7 vampires ago our forefathers set forth to slay the undead.

I think once you get to HoL, Gus, you will enjoy it.




message 31: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Clausen Lately, I've had the need to read something that I've already read. Whenever I finish a semester, I need to read something closely and carefully--to savor every word. This winter break, I'm reading Murakami's Sputnik Sweetheart. I love that book. But soon I think I'll try to read something I've never read before.


message 32: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Clausen Angie wrote: "I usually have around 10 or 20 books in my possession to read, but I chalk my next read up to my mood, the barometric pressure, what I've read previously. Picking what to read next is nothing short..."

Exactly, I've found that as my school reading dominates my freetime reading, every choice becomes that much more sacred.


message 33: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Clausen David wrote: "yesterday i got Tuesdays with Morrie An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson and The Acid House.. i intend to read sometime next week after packing.. i wanted..."

You'll have to tell me how those two books work out for you. The only Irvine Welsh book I read was Trainspotting. I read it when I was in high school and it took me forever to master that Scottish accent he wrote in. Once I got it down though, the book was thoroughly entertaining. I also felt better than all of the other high schoolers I hung around.


message 34: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments Daniel wrote: "Lately, I've had the need to read something that I've already read. Whenever I finish a semester, I need to read something closely and carefully--to savor every word. This winter break, I'm reading..."

I loved Sputnik Sweetheart, too...an underrated Murakami, in my eyes...




message 35: by Angie (new)

Angie (angabel) Okay so I'm interested in Murakami, but the only book they seem to have at the bookstore is "AfterDark." Is that a good book to start out with? His most famous book seems to be "Kafka on the Shore", or at least, that's the one I initially heard of (but maybe because I'm a Kafka fan). Thoughts?


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Angie wrote: "Okay so I'm interested in Murakami, but the only book they seem to have at the bookstore is "AfterDark." Is that a good book to start out with? His most famous book seems to be "Kafka on the Shore"..."

I would start with The Wind Up Bird Chronicles Angie, and then Kafka On The Shore.

Hopefully RA & Sally give their opinions too.




message 37: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments The problem with starting with Wind-Up Bird Chronicle is the book is so huge...big commitment. Jacks just read, I believe, Kafka on the Shore as her first Murakami.


message 38: by Jackie "the Librarian" (last edited Dec 03, 2009 03:23PM) (new)

Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments Yes, it was my first, and I found it easy to get into. It moved right along. I really, really liked it.

I'm got another Murakami I'm going to start tomorrow, I forget which one...


message 39: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Clausen RandomAnthony wrote: "The problem with starting with Wind-Up Bird Chronicle is the book is so huge...big commitment. Jacks just read, I believe, Kafka on the Shore as her first Murakami."

That might be a better next book for me. I've been let down by one Murakami book in the past: Hardboiled Wonderland and the End of the World. I need something that will enchant me--nothing quite does it like Sputnik Sweetheart does.

Anyone have any ideas about how I can find another book that will enchant me?



message 40: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments Hardboiled Wonderland is such a unique Murakami...it's a lot different, in my eyes, than his other work. Ben Harrison wrote a good review not long ago.


message 41: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (KSprink) | 11469 comments just read The Christmas List. fun, easy read for the holiday season. think i got a few tear drops on the pages of a library book though


message 42: by Peanut (new)

Peanut | 35 comments Jackie "the Librarian" wrote: "I liked the Austen parts, but didn't think they did enough with the zombies. I never felt that our heroine was truly in danger.
Much wasted potential in that book, Peanut."


I didn't really like it. All he did was copy what she did but added a few words and sentences, and maybe a paragraph or two. It wasn't worth reading for me. I thought that it would be the same character and stuff but thought that he would pretty much redo the whole thing. Idk it just wasn't what I expected.


Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments Agreed, Peanut.


message 44: by Peanut (new)

Peanut | 35 comments Thanks, Jackie!


message 45: by Sally, la reina (new)

Sally (MrsNolte) | 17292 comments Mod
I think I'm going to try Motherless Brooklyn again over break. I tried this summer, but I was distracted with constant thesis research/guilt and didn't get far.
I also have a Murakami short story collection I'd like to delve into, and of course I have Sputnick Sweetheart to read from Chairy.
It is my tradition to read A Little Princess every Christmas (done it since I was 10) so I guess that'll be first.
once I read those,
What was a great book this year that I missed out on while reading oodles of educational and narrative theory? What should I get on the waiting list at the library for?


message 46: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments I loved Sputnik Sweetheart.

I'm reading the very good latest Klosterman now. Then I want to read The Book of Disquiet. Then I might read the pervy unicorn book Jackie's recommending.


message 47: by Gus (new)

Gus Sanchez (GusSanchez) I'm also reading Eating the Dinosaur, RA. So far, I think this might be his best collection of essays yet.


Jackie "the Librarian" | 8993 comments I'm finishing up Consider the Lobster by David Foster Wallace, I'm in the middle of A Wild Sheep Chase by Murakami, and I've got The Carbon Diaries 2015 up next, which I'll probably read at the same time as with Stardust by Neil Gaiman.


message 49: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments Gus wrote: "I'm also reading Eating the Dinosaur, RA. So far, I think this might be his best collection of essays yet. "

Yes, I agree...this one is more focused, calmer, less off the cuff...I just finished the excellent time-travel essay...




message 50: by Jaimie (new)

Jaimie (Jez476) | 664 comments Somehow I got myself into juggling three books. I hate that. I was reading a horror novel and so I needed something light for reading in bed and I put them both down this weekend so I can read "A Christmas Carol." Oy vei!


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