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Archives > [2020] Voting for 14th Mini Poll

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message 1: by Bryony, Circumnavigation Mod (last edited Sep 16, 2019 02:16PM) (new)

Bryony (bryony46) | 1058 comments Mod
It's now time to get ready to vote for our next set of prompts! But as we discussed before the process began, we are going to open the poll one day after we've gathered the suggestions. This is a good opportunity to ask any question you may have regarding the prompts, do some research or ask for recommendations.

Voting will open on Monday 16 September and results will be posted on Saturday 21 September 21.

How it works:
- When the voting opens, follow the link to the mini-poll that will be added at the end of this post
- You have a total of 8 votes this poll to spread across your favourite and least favourite prompts (you can also use less than 8 votes)
- The poll will be open for five days, so you don't have to rush and vote straightaway
- The prompts with the more "positive" votes (top minus bottom) will be announced shortly after the end of the poll and added to the final list (expect between 2 and 5 depending on how the votes are spread)
- We are asking people to include their Goodreads profile address when they vote. To find this, just go to your own profile and then copy the URL/web address. If for some reason you can't link to your Goodreads profile, please post your full Goodreads name with enough identifiable information that we'll be able to access your profile. We’ve introduced this for two reasons:

1. On a few occasions in each poll, people have used more than the allotted number of votes, either because they aren’t familiar with the rules or just by mistake. When this happens our only option is to disregard the vote as we can’t identify the voter to ask them to resubmit. By asking for your profile address we’ll be able to message you and ask you to vote again if you’ve accidentally used more than the allotted number of votes.

2. Unfortunately a very small number of people have voted more than once per poll and so we are asking for this information to prevent duplicate votes.

As a reminder: You have a total of 8 votes to use among your top and bottom votes. The mods have access to each individual vote, so we can see if you use more than 8 votes. If you use more than 8 votes in the poll, your vote will have to be deleted, so please make sure to follow the directions so your voice can be heard.

Poll Entries:
1. In the first book you read for the challenge go to the page number of your age - line: Your birth date - word: Your birth month . Find a book title that contains the word.
2. A book related to a NASA mission name (in celebration of 20 years of the ISS)
3. A book by an author whose real name(s) you're not quite sure how to pronounce
4. A book with a title that doesn't contain the letters A, T or Y
5. A book that features a character in at least two different points of life (childhood, adulthood, old age, etc.)
6. A book about/involving social media or technology
7. A book with or about twins
8. A book with a cover that is mainly one color, excluding black & white
9. A book with a cover that reminds you of the sky (either sky-like colours or an actual skyscape)
10. A book that brings you joy
11. A book with a place name in the title (town/city, state/province, country, continent, planet...)
12. A book that you are prompted to read because of something you read in 2019
13. A nonfiction book about something you see on a regular basis
14. A book with a title based on an idiom
15. A book that cost you USD1 or less

Vote here:
https://www.surveymoz.com/s/Q2VIC/


message 2: by Stacey (last edited Sep 15, 2019 11:48PM) (new)

Stacey | 43 comments I suggested: A Book by an Author whose real name(s) you're not quite sure how to pronounce and I considered it a lot before suggesting it so I've included my thoughts in this thread as well as I said I would. :)

For clarification (just in case); I mean the name of the author NOT the title of the book. Also I'm thinking first name or last name or both names (& both names could be a BIO option here). I feel like the word "real" is a little bit clunky BUT I felt like it should be included to avoid confusion about what to do with pen names/pseudonyms in this case.


Possible Upsides

-This prompt will encourage (but not necessitate) ethnic diversity for literally everyone; it's a more inclusive way to encourage diversity.
-This prompt will encourage reading a lesser-known author since most of us have probably physically heard the names of more popular, famous authors. (Although there are several famous authors whose name(s) are often mispronounced too!)
-This is a prompt that is very flexible, it has A LOT of options/variety available as far as genre, date of publication, subject matter etc.
-There are many ways to find a book for this one and it suits people who like to just browse at the library/book store, people who like to research & plan ahead and people who like to fit their books/TBR into the prompts.
-There are online resources out there to help find a book for this, such as:
https://www.bookbrowse.com/authors/au...

https://www.rd.com/culture/popular-au...

https://sites.google.com/a/soledadapp...

Neutral Thoughts
For some these may be positives, for some these may be negatives...

-We do already have a few winning prompts for 2020 that are author based
-This is a very individual prompt (some people may know how to pronounce a certain authors' name(s) while others may not)
-Depending on your preferred method of book selection for this prompt, you may learn how to correctly pronounce the authors' name(s) in the process of researching a book which could be problematic for someone who likes to be very literal with the prompts. If someone wanted to remain very literal they may have a few less options as far as how to go about choosing a book to fit this one but I don't think this is too problematic (hence the neutral section) because there are still plenty of ways to research a book for this one. Browsing TBR/Library/Bookstore, the prompt threads, borrowed/gifted book would all still be acceptable to someone who wants to remain completely literal.

Possible Downsides

-This eliminates using any authors' pen name or pseudonym as the name you can't pronounce which could require a little extra research, you could still read a book under a pen name/pseudonym but it would be because you're not sure how to pronounce the author's real name.
-You wouldn't be able to find a book for this one based on any recommendations in any kind of audio format (bookish podcasts, booktubers etc.) because you'll have already heard the authors' name(s) pronounced.
-Someone who likes to be very literal with their prompts may eliminate the option of listening to an audiobook for this one (since they'll hear the pronunciation at the beginning).
-You might have more of a challenge/tougher time finding a classic to fit this prompt. *EDIT to add that this would be because classics are celebrated works that have stood the test of time so we have possibly more likely heard the authors' name(s) pronounced before.


message 3: by Emily, Conterminous Mod (new)

Emily Bourque (emilyardoin) | 7011 comments Mod
Yay!

My suggestion was #5, a book that features a character in at least two different points of life.

For this prompt, I thought about a dual timeline book where an older character was reflecting on their past - whether it's someone elderly thinking about their early adulthood or an adult revisiting their past.

It was worded this way, however, to include books that follow a character through their teenage years into their adult years. I've read a lot of books recently that are structured like this and I've enjoyed them.

We are short on character-based prompts, so I thought this would be a fun addition.


message 4: by dalex (new)

dalex (912dalex) | 1715 comments Stacey wrote: "I suggested: A Book by an Author whose real name(s) you're not quite sure how to pronounce and I considered it a lot before suggesting it..."

I was amused when I first saw this prompt suggestion because I just encountered this dilemma recently. When I was researching for an author with a one syllable last name I came across Shobha Rao on my TBR List. Is that pronounced with one syllable (like RAHW) or two syllables (RaOh)?

I have quite a few authors on my TBR List I cannot pronounce and since I rarely listen to podcasts or booktubers or whatever I'll never hear them said out loud to learn the correct pronunciation.

This prompt will definitely be an upvote for me.


message 5: by Jill (new)

Jill | 569 comments Totally forgot the suggestion thread opened this morning so I forgot to check before I went to church. I just remembered and was thrilled to see you already had the 15 suggestions and even more thrilled about so many of the suggestions. It is going to be fun voting! I might even end up with all up votes!


message 6: by Emily, Conterminous Mod (new)

Emily Bourque (emilyardoin) | 7011 comments Mod
I agree, Jill.. there are a lot in here that I really like and only one or two that I wouldn't want in. My votes will definitely be heavy on the upvote.


message 7: by Pam (new)

Pam (bluegrasspam) | 2524 comments I will probably upvote 7. There’s only 1 I don’t like. I’m reading the perfect book now for the authors name you don’t know to pronounce. It’s a Polish author -Mariusz Szczygiel.


message 8: by Jody (new)

Jody (jodybell) | 3469 comments I realise I'm being a total hypocrite, after saying in another thread how the picking apart of the wording every prompt drives me crazy ... but I'm irrationally annoyed at #15 being so specifically American.


message 9: by Katie (new)

Katie | 2369 comments I think that the name pronunciation prompt is interesting because it's so different. I'm not sure why we want to specify that it's the author's real name though. I think the prompt would work just as well without that qualifier.


message 10: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthag503) | 271 comments I am leaning toward 5 down votes, 3 up votes. I think I'm getting burned out with the voting/nomination process at this point. That and the 2-week period of nominating/voting makes everything feel like it's never going to end and I'm feeling cranky.


message 11: by Laura, Celestial Sphere Mod (new)

Laura | 3823 comments Mod
I think the USD1 prompt is the type of prompt that I would be fine with re-wording it as a moderator.

If people have an idea for how to make it more inclusive, then let us know. I’m not sure of a universal term.


message 12: by Bryony, Circumnavigation Mod (new)

Bryony (bryony46) | 1058 comments Mod
I agree about the USD prompt. We could add something like “or a comparable amount in your currency”? I don’t think it works to say an equivalent amount because that will fluctuate depending on exchange rates, and because the purchasing power of 1USD will vary so much that it makes it a different prompt for people in different countries.

Or you could tie it to the cost of something - like a book that cost you less than a cup of coffee, or a book that cost less than a daily newspaper?


message 13: by Stacey (last edited Sep 15, 2019 04:38PM) (new)

Stacey | 43 comments Katie wrote: "I think that the name pronunciation prompt is interesting because it's so different. I'm not sure why we want to specify that it's the author's real name though. I think the prompt would work just ..."

Thank you! :) I think it's interesting too

Funnily enough, I actually didn't include the word real when I first came up with the idea but after thinking about it....

I figured if I didn't include the word real that it would create some confusion when it came to a book written under a pen name/pseudonym, that people would maybe argue about whether a case like that would or should count and to me the spirit of the prompt is to encourage ethnic diversity & lesser known authors so it just seemed to make more sense to me that it should be based on their real name(s).

Sometimes people with difficult names adopt nicknames (maybe there are authors who use a pen name/pseudonym for this reason?) and sometimes immigrants who come to western countries adopt English versions of their name. By basing this prompt on their real name it wouldn't exclude any authors that potentially would fall within these situations. :)

That was my reasoning anyways! Hopefully that makes sense?


message 14: by Pam (new)

Pam (bluegrasspam) | 2524 comments For #15, a suggestion for rewording- a Book you acquired at a bargain price. There may be people that don’t buy or have access to $1 books! If I do, it’s from the Dollar Tree or the library but that’s a tiny % of my book collection. Even Goodwill is not that cheap! If you change the wording to acquire, then it could be a free book or library book.


message 15: by Chrissy (new)

Chrissy | 825 comments Pam wrote: "For #15, a suggestion for rewording- a Book you acquired at a bargain price. There may be people that don’t buy or have access to $1 books! If I do, it’s from the Dollar Tree or the library but tha..."

I think this is a great suggested change. It deals with the currency issue. Something that also allows for free books is necessary, I think.


message 16: by Karissa (new)

Karissa | 433 comments While I love a good scavenger hunt, I'm not thrilled about the first prompt, In the first book you read for the challenge go to the page number of your age - line: Your birth date - word: Your birth month . Find a book title that contains the word. I plan on doing my ATY challenge in all audiobooks so I would have to also get a hold of the physical copy of that book which is a bit annoying. I wish instead the prompt was maybe to pick one of your favorite books so we would have some more options.


message 17: by Rachel (new)

Rachel A. (abyssallibrarian) | 2633 comments Reposting this from the suggestion thread, in case people are looking for ideas:

I am totally open to adjusting the wording, but my idea was for a book where the social media (blogs/vlogs, podcasts, Facebook, Twitter, e-mail, texting, etc.) or technology (computers, robots, AI, etc.) aspect is a major part of the story (for fiction) or the focus of the book (for non-fiction).

I also think it is something that can fit a lot of different genres. Just a few suggestions (you are obviously not limited to picking from this list):

- YA
The Takedown (viral video)
Warcross (virtual reality)
Sadie (podcast)
Emergency Contact (texting)
The Lunar Chronicles (cyborgs)
Illuminae (AI, spaceships)
I Hate Everyone But You (texting)
The Love Letters of Abelard and Lily (instant messaging)
Tash Hearts Tolstoy (vlogging)
If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say (online comments)
Eliza and Her Monsters (webcomic)

- Mystery/Thriller
Friend Request (Facebook)
Kiss Me First (online community)
You (stalking via social media posts)
Copycat (Facebook)
Reconstructing Amelia (using social media to find out what happened)
Don't Try to Find Me (using social media to find out what happened)

- Contemporary
The Status of All Things (Facebook)
Attachments (email)
Read Bottom Up (email)
Goodnight Tweetheart (Twitter)
Save as Draft (email and various social networks)
Gena/Finn (text, IM, blogging)

- Sci-Fi
Crosstalk
Feed (blogging)
The Circle

This list has tons of suggestions from a variety of genres, including many non-fiction: https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/...


message 18: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Kiefer I'm pretty uncomfortable with the name pronunciation prompt. I agree the list is in desperate need of any kind of diversity, but it feels very exoticizing to frame it in this way. It feels like the opposite of uplifting voices of color based on whether or not their name is something "easy" to pronounce for white people. Below is a link to a short article quoting Uzo Aduba about why she is unwilling to change her name, as well as a longer blog post by a Sri Lankan woman living in Canada inspired by her personal experiences and reaction to that interview.

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/uzo-ad...
https://hellogiggles.com/lifestyle/sa...


message 19: by °~Amy~° (new)

°~Amy~° (amybooksit) | 2872 comments Rebecca wrote: "I'm pretty uncomfortable with the name pronunciation prompt. I agree the list is in desperate need of any kind of diversity, but it feels very exoticizing to frame it in this way. It feels like the..."

Um, I don't know, I have a very hard time pronouncing a lot of "white" names, German/Hungarian/Italian.....they all get me far more than any other country.


message 20: by Charity (new)

Charity (faeryrebel78) | 552 comments I’m not a fan of the first prompt because I tried it on the book I’m reading and didn’t get a word. My birthday is the 28th which ended up being the last sentence on the page. When I started counting for the month there weren’t 12 words in the sentence.


message 21: by Emily, Conterminous Mod (new)

Emily Bourque (emilyardoin) | 7011 comments Mod
Yea my birthday is April 10, so every page should meet that criteria, but I can see how people born in later months and/or later in the month could have trouble.


message 22: by Chrissy (new)

Chrissy | 825 comments The birthday just gives you the starting point to count from - keep going into the next line or page if you need to! (Mine is the 31st...)


message 23: by Serendipity (new)

Serendipity | 439 comments I’m with Rebecca. The name prompt makes me all kinds of uncomfortable. Wasn’t sure if or how to bring it up. Glad I’m not the only one.


message 24: by Bryony, Circumnavigation Mod (new)

Bryony (bryony46) | 1058 comments Mod
I’m not sure I understand what is problematic about simply acknowledging that you don’t know how to pronounce a name you’re unfamiliar with.

The articles linked to both refer to people suggesting that names they perceive as being from other countries or cultures are too hard to pronounce or not worth learning to pronounce. That’s absolutely abhorrent but it’s not the same as simply acknowledging that you don’t know how to pronounce a name which is what this suggestion is about.

I’m sure everyone has had the experience of seeing a name and being unsure how to pronounce it. Most people don’t have a clue how to pronounce Irish (Gaelic) names, or Basque names, for example. I don’t see what is problematic about acknowledging that you don’t know how to pronounce a name, as long as you are willing to learn and don’t suggest that the person’s name should be changed to make it easier for you!


message 25: by Sophie (last edited Sep 15, 2019 06:19PM) (new)

Sophie (soapsuds) | 152 comments Bryony wrote: "I’m not sure I understand what is problematic about simply acknowledging that you don’t know how to pronounce a name you’re unfamiliar with.

The articles linked to both refer to people suggesting..."


For what it’s worth, being a native French speaker, I have much difficulty pronouncing English names [ How does one pronounce McLeod? Leod pronounced as 2 syllables as in Leon? Or is it more like Lloyd making it sound like McLloyd?Or is it more like Loud as in Mcloud? ). I think it’s a good prompt to encourage people to learn the right pronunciation of someone’s name.


message 26: by Emily, Conterminous Mod (new)

Emily Bourque (emilyardoin) | 7011 comments Mod
When I saw this prompt, I immediately thought about how I mispronounced Hermione's name for so many years until the fourth Harry Potter book finally came out and explained it lol.


message 27: by Katie (new)

Katie | 2369 comments Does points of life refer to stages of life, or is it meant to include 2 distinct time periods of a person's life?


message 28: by Stacey (last edited Sep 15, 2019 09:04PM) (new)

Stacey | 43 comments Rebecca wrote: "I'm pretty uncomfortable with the name pronunciation prompt. I agree the list is in desperate need of any kind of diversity, but it feels very exoticizing to frame it in this way. It feels like the..."

I do understand your point but my intention wasn't to make it feel exoticizing. I was thinking that unfamiliar to you is a great way to inclusively, individually, include ethnic diversity if you want to in your challenge. I by no means am saying or implying that you can't find ethnic diversity with names you already know how to pronounce or that an author of a different ethnicity than you whose name you can pronounce has a less valid PoV than one whose name you cannot pronounce. :/ Also, this is no way means it has to be an author of colour, there are plenty of authors of ALL ethnicities whose names I have difficulty knowing how to pronounce. From my recent reads Riley Sager is a good example. (Is it Say-jer, Saw-gr?). I think it's forward thinking to admit that something is unfamiliar to you and that maybe you should learn more. I don't think that the framing of the prompt makes it seem like unfamiliar is bad? My intention is to encourage people to go explore the unfamiliar.

My intention was simply to make it a prompt to simultaneously encourage an author likely less popular that you aren't familiar with & diversity for literally everyone, (not just a diversity prompt for those of us that are north american & white). So many prompts I come across to encourage diversity are like read an author from x continent/country and I always found that to sort of american-centric and to be missing the point for anyone who was participating from that continent/country. THAT is the reason that I framed the prompt this way. I felt that framing it this way made a prompt where anyone could easily include ethnic diversity, that it was inclusive to everyone participating in the challenge. I don't feel like this prompt absolutely necessitates it by any means.

I think perhaps the discomfort arises when we're bringing in the discussion of someone who wants to remain literal with their prompts....I'm not saying that someone can't learn the pronunciation of an author's name after filling this prompt or shouldn't bother to...in fact I think it will end up encouraging the opposite especially if people then want to discuss what they've read. I just know that some people are very literal with their prompts and would have difficulty learning the pronunciation BEFORE filling the prompt BUT even in that case, it's not problematic to learn the pronunciation AFTER you've filled the prompt! :)

Hopefully that helps


message 29: by Emily, Conterminous Mod (new)

Emily Bourque (emilyardoin) | 7011 comments Mod
Katie, I meant stages of life, so childhood, teen years, new adult, adulthood, parenthood, middle age, retirement age, elderly, etc.

I was thinking more about seeing a character through two stages of life, rather than just in their current situation... giving them a chance to reflect on their choices. I've read quite a few books like this recently, and I thought it really gave me a chance to see growth in the character, more than just seeing their reaction to the events in the present.


message 30: by Peter (new)

Peter | 0 comments Sophie wrote: "Bryony wrote: "I’m not sure I understand what is problematic about simply acknowledging that you don’t know how to pronounce a name you’re unfamiliar with.

The articles linked to both refer to pe..."


That particular name varies....

I work with more than one person with that last name.

One pronounces it like "McLodd"
Another pronounces it "McCloud"

Just to weigh in on this - one of my favourite authors growing up was Michael Crichton, and I pronounced his name as "Critch-ten" for years until I learned it was "Cright-on".

Anyone's name can be mispronounced, it doesn't target any particular demographic, especially when viewed from the context that we have members from varied backgrounds. Continuing with the example of "Mcleod" mentioned above, that name may be difficult for one person, but not for another. It's really dependent on each individual's experience. As Bryony said, I don't believe there's anything inherently negative if someone acknowledges that they are unsure on the correct pronunciation, as long as it is an acknowledgement of not knowing, not an excuse to discriminate.


message 31: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (anastasiaharris) | 1305 comments Many people mispronounced my first name for years. If they have seen the animated movie of the same name they can pronounce it. I work in a pediatrician's office were names with the same spellings are often pronounced differently depending on background of parents. It is not a horrible thing to admit you have difficulty pronouncing a name. Being open to learning how is the answer.
This prompt is about learning how to say the name. That is not being racist.


message 32: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Kiefer Again, my issue is the *framing* and how it centers the white reader, as implied by saying it would be ethnically diverse. To use one of Bryony’s examples, I think it is very different to say “I will read a book centering the Basque experience, which will probably address why I’m not familiar with the language as a white reader” versus what the prompt says, which is centering the white reader’s experience of “I don’t know how to pronounce Basque names” without doing any interrogation of why that is. That’s what makes me uncomfortable.


message 33: by Peter (last edited Sep 15, 2019 08:21PM) (new)

Peter | 0 comments But... there's absolutely nothing in the prompt to indicate it is centered on a "white reader". It simply states an author (of no particular background) whose name a member of this group participating in the challenge (of varied and diverse backgrounds) has difficulty pronouncing. As Stacey explained, she worded it the way she did so that it can apply to any author, of any particular background, for any individual member of this group, the only criteria is being unsure of how to pronounce the author's name.


message 34: by Stacey (last edited Sep 15, 2019 11:29PM) (new)

Stacey | 43 comments Rebecca wrote: "Again, my issue is the *framing* and how it centers the white reader, as implied by saying it would be ethnically diverse. To use one of Bryony’s examples, I think it is very different to say “I wi..."

See, I feel the opposite! I feel like each individual is going to have difficulty with pronunciation of SOMEONES name(s) regardless of their ethnicity and that they can still find an ethnically diverse option if they want to & that is why I say that this is an individual prompt! That there will be names that some people know how to pronounce that others do not know. I certainly DON'T think that white people are the only race who might see unfamiliarity in the pronunciation of a name. I don't think that every POC knows how to pronounce every other POC's name immediately....just like I don't think that every white person immediately knows how to pronounce every other white person's name. There are different cultures within a race. I say in my original post that it doesn't necessitate ethnic diversity but that it encourages it.

I feel like it does the opposite of framing the white reader..I feel like it makes it inclusive for everyone.


message 35: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Kiefer I’m on mobile, so I can’t quote but the first upside listed is to “encourage ethnic diversity.” One downside is an audio format wouldn’t work, which eliminates seeking out a diverse author narrating their own story in their own voice. Another downside is it would probably make choosing a classic hard, and a great majority of the literary canon is white - imposing another expectation that people are going to be generally familiar with white names and not others. This is part of why I included two links related to that interview. The wording by the prompter *explicitly* acknowledges the fact people will probably know how to pronounce something like Tchaikovsky (in fact, my phone has this name in autocorrect) but not Aduba, which is something POC have communicated is distressing.


message 36: by Laura, Celestial Sphere Mod (new)

Laura | 3823 comments Mod
Those are pros and cons that the member suggested in order to aid people in discussing and thinking about the prompt for voting. It definitely isn’t actually stated in the prompt anywhere, as you can see in the shortened list of prompts entered. I’m sure her list was focused on the diversity of the prompt in response to our focus on diversity in the discussion this year. As the example that Peter gave exemplifies, there’s plenty of names, white or POC, that people may have difficulty pronouncing.


message 37: by Stacey (last edited Sep 15, 2019 11:53PM) (new)

Stacey | 43 comments Rebecca wrote: "I’m on mobile, so I can’t quote but the first upside listed is to “encourage ethnic diversity.” One downside is an audio format wouldn’t work, which eliminates seeking out a diverse author narratin..."

I do still feel like this encourages ethnic diversity for everyone. I don't think that a POC sees another POC's (of a different ethnicity) name and immediately thinks it's familiar and knows how to pronounce it.

The possible downsides that include audio are ONLY for someone who wants to remain really literal with the prompt and most importantly it ONLY would prevent learning the pronunciation BEFORE reading the book. I think if anything they'll be encouraged to learn the pronunciation after the fact incase they want to discuss the book.

IF you wanted to remain literal with the prompt you could still absolutely READ that own voices book by a POC, it only would eliminate the AUDIO format & the prompt doesn't discriminate it would be ANY AUDIO for ANY author of ANY ethnicity that would be an issue if you wished to remain literal. I'm not quite understanding why this is a race issue?

You've made an assumption about why I've included "choosing a classic could be difficult". The fact that it could be difficult has NADA to do with race, it's because by definition a classic is a celebrated piece that has been around for ages. It's because chances are that being interested in books we've probably physically heard these names pronounced before because they are celebrated works NOT because of their author's ethnicity.

I do understand that this world has a history of racism and that celebrated, classic works tend to be written by white authors but I don't understand why that's really a consideration in this specific scenario..this prompt encourages choosing something OTHER than those options if you as a reader would already know how to pronounce the authors' name(s).


message 38: by Peter (new)

Peter | 0 comments I sort of think an audio book is actually a great choice for this prompt because I can pick a book that I'm unsure on the pronunciation of the author's name, and be confident that in listening to the audio that I have learned to correct pronunciation.


message 39: by Stacey (new)

Stacey | 43 comments Peter wrote: "I sort of think an audio book is actually a great choice for this prompt because I can pick a book that I'm unsure on the pronunciation of the author's name, and be confident that in listening to t..."

Yes :) I only mentioned it as a possible downside for someone who wants to remain completely literal with their prompt, not as a downside for anyone doing the challenge! =)


message 40: by Pam (new)

Pam (bluegrasspam) | 2524 comments I don’t see any problem with the name pronunciation prompt. There are lots of names in every language that people don’t know how to pronounce. There are a variety of reasons including: not knowing the language, the spelling is unusual, and there are multiple pronunciations! My daughter Eev gets asked all the time how to pronounce her name. Nothing exotic, just a weird spelling. I like the prompt. It’s different and encourages us to seek new authors. They don’t even have to be new. Could be we have assumed we knew how to pronounce a name and find out that all along we were mispronouncing it (e.g. Camus, Picoult, Michel, Gillian). Book Riot even has a video on Commonly Mispronounced Author Names.


message 41: by Edie (new)

Edie | 826 comments Stacey wrote: "Rebecca wrote: "I’m on mobile, so I can’t quote but the first upside listed is to “encourage ethnic diversity.” One downside is an audio format wouldn’t work, which eliminates seeking out a diverse..."

I love this prompt. I don't see it as focused on any ethnicity. I can't use her for this, but until I made a point of looking up how to pronounce her name, I had no idea how to pronounce Ng as in Celeste Ng. I would think you could count audio books IF you selected them before listening to them. I'm not an audio book reader usually, but I certainly will learn to pronounce the name of whoever's book I choose before I start reading it.


message 42: by Angie (new)

Angie | 804 comments Pam wrote: "I don’t see any problem with the name pronunciation prompt. There are lots of names in every language that people don’t know how to pronounce. There are a variety of reasons including: not knowing ..."

Turns out I've been mispronouncing Gillian Flynn's name for years. Who knew? Not me, apparently.

I like the prompt.


message 43: by Stacey (last edited Sep 15, 2019 08:47PM) (new)

Stacey | 43 comments Edie wrote: "Stacey wrote: "Rebecca wrote: "I’m on mobile, so I can’t quote but the first upside listed is to “encourage ethnic diversity.” One downside is an audio format wouldn’t work, which eliminates seekin..."

Haha me too! That is one I looked up after reading Little Fires Everywhere last year! I remember trying to guess beforehand and being horribly wrong! (I had been wondering if it would be anything like the pronunciation of Ngyuen, which as far as I know sounds a lot like "when")

You bring up a good point about those like like to remain literal with the prompts..perhaps it's okay to select the book to fit the prompt then learn the pronunciation even before reading the book! I guess that's up to the individual! :)


message 44: by Eujean2 (new)

Eujean2 | 70 comments In case others are also curious about NASA Mission Names, here is a link:
https://www.nasa.gov/missions


message 45: by Eujean2 (new)

Eujean2 | 70 comments Any suggestions for titles based on an idiom?


message 46: by Stacey (last edited Sep 16, 2019 12:21AM) (new)

Stacey | 43 comments I think I should explain the framing a little bit more...

Firstly I just want to say that I know that there are people out there who do reading challenges who like to be extremely literal with prompts and I wanted to list some concerns that THEY specifically may have about this prompt for the voting process. The concerns certainly don't apply to everyone which is why I've used the words "POSSIBLE" and "IF they want to be literal" etc.

When I say someone who wants to be/remain totally literal with the prompt, I'm talking about someone who wants either select the book AND/OR have read the book without at those times *and ONLY at those times,* knowing the proper pronunciation of the authors name(s) because the prompt specifies "you're" in the present tense.

This does NOT mean that they can't/won't/shouldn't learn the pronunciation after the fact. Once they have already read (past tense) the book, they have fulfilled the challenge requirement and can then be free research/learn the proper pronunciation of the authors' name(s). I think that this prompt actually encourages that for people who like to discuss the books they've read as well.

My comments about encouraging ethnic diversity have also come into question, so I also think it's worth mentioning a reminder that ethnicity can mean race OR culture (language, religion, customs etc.). Are there some ethnicities that seem more unfamiliar and foreign to us? Yes, sure, but that doesn't mean that a different culture of the same skin colour/country of origin isn't considered a different, diverse ethnicity to YOU. That entirely depends on you as a person & that's why this is such an individual prompt. There is no parameter for just "how different" a different race/culture has to be for it to be a different ethnicity. There are plenty of cultures encompassed within one race/colour that can be very different ESPECIALLY when it comes to names; a different culture that spells as well as pronounces names differently even with the same skin colour is still a different culture/ethnicity. So when I say this prompt encourages an ethnically diverse choice, I'm not just basing that on skin colour. My boyfriend & I are an example of this situation: we are both white, both Canadian but he is French Canadian. We are of the same race but have very different cultures right down to our names (his name is Guillaume & he does not have a middle name; as is common in French Canadian culture). [Sometimes French Canadians have middle names, sometimes they don't, sometimes they have them but don't acknowledge them as important or part of their actual full names but that's a whole different story]. If you really want to argue that we aren't ethnically diverse because we are both white and share the same nationality, take a step back and think for a minute. The two of us were raised with different languages (our parents can't even communicate with each other without one of us to translate for heavens sake), and different religious views. We have some different holidays, customs and traditions (like Carnivale & St. Jean Baptiste for him for example). We have different traditional foods as well (like pate-chinois [kind of like shepherd's pie but different] & tarte au sucre [sugar pie] for him). We are absolutely ethnically diverse. I know for a fact that many white, Canadian people do not know how to pronounce his name even though he is also white and Canadian. It is unfamiliar to some of a different ethnicity regardless of skin colour or country of origin. Historically in Canada, it's always been very clear that we are culturally different as well. If you're curious you could look into things like the French & Indian War, the Acadian Expulsion & the Quebec separatist movement.

I'm sorry if that was confusing initially and perhaps part of the reason a couple are uncomfortable?

I think within several posts in the thread I have already explained why I included the specific framing phrases in question and have elaborated sufficiently in this post. I hope that you know I genuinely didn't mean anything in a discriminatory way towards anyone and I'm sorry & sad that some of you were uncomfortable because my view of & aim of this prompt is to be inclusive.


message 47: by Rachel (new)

Rachel A. (abyssallibrarian) | 2633 comments Emily wrote: "When I saw this prompt, I immediately thought about how I mispronounced Hermione's name for so many years until the fourth Harry Potter book finally came out and explained it lol."

That one was an issue for me too! I remember reading the books to my dad when I was in elementary school and struggling with her name, so I asked him if I could call her something else instead. I remember him explaining that it wouldn't be fair to rename her just because I didn't know how to say it.

On the other hand, I had no idea how to pronounce Seamus (as in Seamus Finnegan from Harry Potter) until I saw the movies! I thought it was pronounced See-mus, but it's actually Shay-mus.


message 48: by Anabell (last edited Sep 16, 2019 12:35AM) (new)

Anabell | 40 comments For the first entry I suggested:
1. In the first book you read for the challenge go to the page number of your age - line: Your birth date - word: Your birth month . Find a book title that contains the word.

It was suggested to change the wording to:
In the first book you read for the challenge
Go to the page that corresponds to your age
Go to the line that corresponds to your birth date
Go to the word that corresponds to your birth month
Read a book with a title that contains that word


I have no problem changing the wording. My first time making a suggestion and help is always appreciated.

Someone commented that they didn't get a word. But every step is meant as a starting point. So when you have found your page you keep counting the number of lines that are your birthdate so if you are born on the 31sth you count 31 one lines from your starting page. If that means going to the next page then you continue on the next page till you get to 31. From the beginning of the 31st line you count the number for the months you were born. So if you are born in December you count 12 words even if it continues in to the next line or even over to another page. This will most likely happen if you are reading on a kindle.
Like following a treasure map. You count out 10 steps even if there is a fence in the way. then you get around or over the fence to get to 10 steps :-)


message 49: by Anabell (new)

Anabell | 40 comments Peter wrote: "I sort of think an audio book is actually a great choice for this prompt because I can pick a book that I'm unsure on the pronunciation of the author's name, and be confident that in listening to t..."

So just a fun fact with pronunciation (which can be a hard word to say for non-english native)
An author I know had one of her books made in to audiobook. When they first heard it, the narrator had pronounced one of the main characters name wrong all the way through. The author wasn't actually part of the process of the recording.

And there is an entire documentary about penguins that Benedict Cumberbatch (also really hard name) narrate where he mispronounces 'Penguin' throughout the entire program.


message 50: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1703 comments I hope the social media/tech one gets in. It's such a huge part of our lives, it makes sense that it should be incorporated into stories. I especially like ones with Black Mirror vibes.

Some I've read that I'd recommend: Heartstream, No Harm Can Come to a Good Man, Glaze, After Atlas, All the Lonely People.

Some lists:
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1...
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1...
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1...

With the birthday word one, I'd be too worried about being stuck with a duff word. And what about audiobooks and graphic novels? It's all very well saying don't do them first but I'd quite like to try reading in order and until I know what the first prompt is, I don't think I could know if this one will work for me.

I like the idea of a prompt to encourage me to read something I picked up cheap, but I probably won't vote for it because of the currency.


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