SciFi and Fantasy Book Club discussion

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Members' Chat > Where do you get your books from?

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message 1: by John (new)

John | 401 comments Where do you get a majority of the books you read from? Are you strictly a library check out person? Buy it new? Or do you hit up the used book stores and/or thrift shops? Do you keep your books/shelf them? Or do you donate or sell them once you've read them? Why?


message 2: by John (last edited May 30, 2018 03:35AM) (new)

John | 401 comments Lately I have been getting most of my books via thrift shops like Goodwill, Salvation Army, etc. I do hit up the used book stores if I am looking for something specific, and will buy new if it is a book I have been desperately wanting/need. The final option is usually because it is part of a series, like I bought all the new The Wheel of time series by Robert Jordan when those started to come out again, the same with The Dark Tower.

I will hit up a library on occasion, but the closes one to me is a 45 minute drive, and I only go near it about once a month and don't always have time to go in when I am in the area.

I do keep most of my books. I have the room and do have quite an extensive library, which has only be achievable by buying books at a considerable discount.


message 3: by Paul (new)

Paul  Perry (pezski) | 291 comments The majority of books I currently buy are probably ebooks, kindle of google play special offers. Second to that are charity shops, and I tend to do fairly regular charity shop trawls ; partly that's also the joy of random finds. Now and then I allow myself to go to my local bookshop, the Waterstones in Sheffield city centre, and usually end up coming out with 4-6 books, almost always from the buy-one-get-one-half-price selection



I don't use the library nearly enough, but am going to do so more especially for graphic novels.



I've had to force myself to get rid of books once I've read them, unless I am definitely in love with it and know I will reread. We have a small library in the recreation room at work (mostly my former books), or I pass them to friends or take them to the charity shop.


message 4: by Jacqueline (new)

Jacqueline | 2306 comments I get mine from everywhere. Except I don’t order them off the Internet. Sometimes I go to Thrift shops. Others I go to second hand bookshops. I’ve found a couple of really good ones. Mostly I get new ones at a much discounted price from Big W. And very rarely I’ll get them from proper bookshops. Oh and I find and download books for my iPad but I usually end up buying the ones I want to read as paperbacks anyway because the iPad has been giving me eye strain.


message 5: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 2610 comments This year most of my reading has come from the library. Ebooks, audiobooks, physical books. It’s been truly wonderful to rediscover my library system. My only really complaint is that if I don’t want to wait I generally have to pick up a physical copy. Not a big deal- I just prefer to read ebooks (don’t have to lug anything “extra” around, easier to flip open to the last page read, can read in the dark- I just get through ebooks quicker than I ever could physical books).

I also pick up Kindle deals. Prior to this year that’s where most of my reading came from. The problem with this- is that: 1. I was buying far more than I was able to read, and 2. At $1.99, I wasn’t as discriminatory about what I was buying, so I probably picked up a bunch of stuff I didn’t really really want to read. Which kind of prohibited me from getting around to the stuff I did really want to read.

Used book shops are the best!! I have one in my immediate area that’s pretty decent for a small shop. The shelves are sagging and stacked floor to ceiling. There are books on the floor, books stacked in chairs, books in boxes. But I do wish there were another in the area. The best one is about an hour/hour and a half drive for me. It occupies four different physical locations in the town and I could hang out at any of them all day.

If it’s a physical book I have no problem trading them right back for credit. I do hang on to a few books that either I love and will likely reread, or authors I love, or collect series I love. Otherwise it goes back. I don’t have the space.


message 6: by Beste (new)

Beste | 34 comments What about the audibles?


message 7: by John (new)

John | 401 comments Sarah that last location sounds just like a place I used to frequent when I lived in Connecticut, The Book Barn in Niantic, CT. Truly one of the best used book stores I have ever been to, wish there were more like it.


message 8: by Esther (last edited May 30, 2018 04:51AM) (new)

Esther (eshchory) | 522 comments The English-language section at my library is mainly geared to children learning English. Most of the adult section is donated so there is a proponderance of Grishams, Kellermans and others in the popular fiction action genre. The librarian, a friend and ex-colleague) does occasionally invest in some literary fiction but there is never any scifi - my favourite genre. So combined with the fact that I am rarely home when the library is open it is not worth the effort.
I could probably use the library at our nearest big town as I am friendly with the head librarian and I know they have quite a decent English selection but getting there regularly would require some serious planning.
The prices at local bookshops are prohibitive so I get almost all my new books from The Book Depository.
Recently I have also received a lot of e-books from Net Galley.


message 9: by Faith (new)

Faith | 331 comments I have no more room for physical books, but I used to buy them from Amazon and book stores. I also bought a lot of kindle books. Now, I get most of my books from the library in audio or kindle format and I sometimes buy audiobooks from Audible.


message 10: by Robyn (new)

Robyn (birdwithabrain) | 15 comments I try to borrow from the library first and only buy new books I know I love, for money and space constraint reasons, but unfortunately my local library only has a tiny Sci-Fi and Fantasy section I have to just buy books. I try to buy from indie bookshops if I can but again, costs can be prohibitive, and sometimes secondhand on Amazon is all I can afford


message 11: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 2610 comments John that’s exactly the one I’m talking about!! What a small world. I love that book store so much and you’re right- there aren’t enough like it around.


message 12: by Allison, Fairy Mod-mother (new)

Allison Hurd | 13034 comments Mod
I agree with Fail--try library first. Then if the library doesn't have it (which is honestly pretty rare--we have Overdrive and ILL to one of the largest library systems in the country, so we're pretty well stocked), I try to wait for a sale, or ask if friends have a copy. I tend only to buy physical books if it's something I love so much that it gives me joy to to see around me, and that I'd like to lend to friends.

I had Audible for a bit, but I haven't listened to the books I have yet so I canceled it for now.

Also, the Book Barn is great!! That was always a treat when we'd get to go there. I never lived close enough to really use it to its fullest, but it was fun as a kid!


message 13: by colleen the convivial curmudgeon (last edited May 30, 2018 06:15AM) (new)

colleen the convivial curmudgeon (blackrose13) | 2674 comments I get the vast majority of my books from the library or loans from friends.

The only times I buy a book anymore is if I really liked it after reading it or if it's part of a series I know I'll want to buy - in which case I usually buy them new, often from amazon, or ask for it as a gift - or if I'm curious enough about it but my library doesn't have it - in which case I'll try to find a cheap, used copy.


message 14: by CBRetriever (new)

CBRetriever | 4625 comments Amazon Kindle books
Baen mobi books
Humble Bundles
Free Tor books
Gutenberg.org

I no longer do paper books because they're too heavy, I have to also carry a dictionary if I want to look up words, and carrying more than one kills my shoulder, especially if they're hard bound.

Also, I had arrived at the pint where I could walk into a bookstore (used or new) and find absolutely nothing I wanted to purchase. This was because most of them, even the big box ones only had about 100 new books a month, and they leaned towards those they thought would be best sellers or older classics


message 15: by Phillip (new)

Phillip Murrell | 582 comments I like reading books from Indie Authors, therefore I’ve found Kindle Unlimited is perfect for me. Obviously that means I read mostly on my Kindle now (something that I scoffed at a few years ago). I occasionally buy a paperback, but usually only for books in established series that I already enjoy (Star Wars, graphic novels, etc).


message 16: by Robert (new)

Robert Collins I read almost everything on my iPhone, so ebooks for me. I buy from the iBookstore, and I get public domain books from from Project Gutenberg.


message 17: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 2285 comments I depend on the library. I couldn't imagine living more than 20 minutes away from one.

Otoh, now with digital lending programs like Overdrive, I can borrow books from my mom's library which is 2K miles away.


message 18: by Trike (new)

Trike John wrote: "Where do you get a majority of the books you read from?"

Everywhere.


message 19: by Allison, Fairy Mod-mother (new)

Allison Hurd | 13034 comments Mod
Trike wrote: "John wrote: "Where do you get a majority of the books you read from?"

Everywhere."


He lives up in the part of the world where if you leave out some milk for the fairies and bread for the crows, you can literally be gifted books from anywhere. Just make your book intentions known, leave a small price for the woodlands, and collect your gift.


message 20: by Maggie (new)

Maggie (ceodraiocht) | 84 comments Almost exclusively Kindle these days. Similar to CBRetriever, physical books are too heavy. (RSI from having worked full time in computing for too long). To do list includes getting up to date on the library's improved eLending (Overdrive). Hoping I can find the ebooks I've flagged to read that cost more than $8 or so on Overdrive (you've all seen some at $13, just too much for the way I chomp through books unless it's an author I've read and enjoy). Every few months I sign up for Kindle Unlimited, read those for a month and drop it.

Donated all but a few physical books I thought I might re-read during power outages, but at the point now where it's time to donate most of those as well. Moved many bookshelves into closets where they now house craft supplies. Kept gardening, craft, art history and cookbooks. Have some work type books left meaning to turn into spell books or fairy houses (see Pinterest).


message 21: by Bobby (new)

Bobby | 869 comments I don't buy physical books anymore for a few reasons. I live in a small apartment and don't have space for them, I don't like having to make sure there is enough light when/where I want to read, I like being able to carry all of my books on one small tablet, and it's just physically easier to read with a tablet than it is with a book.

I mostly get e-books from two different library systems in my area. Both my city and my county have separate online library systems, so I have two places to look when I want a specific book. Then if both of those systems don't have it, I can always see if one of the branches of my city's library has a physical copy, and get it sent to my nearest branch. That gets me just about every book I could possibly want besides Indie/Self Published authors and a few other exceptions.

A few years back I discovered Book Bub, which notifies you of free or very cheap e-books of whatever genres you choose. I've discovered several Indie/Self Published authors that way. I usually end up getting the first book for free, and then if I really liked it I buy the next in the series or something else from the author. There are plenty of misses, but enough gems that I'll keep doing it.

I also read a few web serials. Those can be fun, and some of them are really well written besides a few typos and mistakes. I mostly read ones about superheroes, but there are plenty out there. I usually have to wait a while and then binge when the story advances a bit, because I just can't take the anticipation of always waiting to know what happens. Just like Indie/Self Published authors, it's a great way to get some hidden gems that aren't mainstream.

I currently got Kindle Unlimited free for a month, so I'm catching up on a lot of books from Indie/Self Published authors that I hadn't gotten around to buying. I think I might start buying a month of it twice a year or so. I don't need it all the time because I read tons of library books, but it's nice to have it for a month and get my fill.


message 22: by Gary (new)

Gary (plaidchuck) | 55 comments The library is definitely my first choice, be it physical or ebook directly or through overdrive/hoopla etc.

There are a couple of nice used book stores near me and one in particular that has about every sci fi and fantasy classic you could think of, so every once in a while I'll buy a few paperbacks that i know I'll want to keep and reread in the future.

Other than that like everyone else i cruise amazon and kobo for deals.


message 23: by Pinar (new)

Pinar | 6 comments city library (books, ebooks, audiobooks), kindle, audible, bookshops, university library and other private libraries..


message 24: by Trike (new)

Trike Allison wrote: "Trike wrote: "John wrote: "Where do you get a majority of the books you read from?"

Everywhere."

He lives up in the part of the world where if you leave out some milk for the fairies and bread for the crows, you can literally be gifted books from anywhere. Just make your book intentions known, leave a small price for the woodlands, and collect your gift. "


Yesterday I got a book in the mail without a return address. No idea who sent it.

Now I’m thinking it’s fairies.


message 25: by Allison, Fairy Mod-mother (new)

Allison Hurd | 13034 comments Mod
Trike wrote: "Allison wrote: "Trike wrote: "John wrote: "Where do you get a majority of the books you read from?"

Everywhere."

He lives up in the part of the world where if you leave out some milk for the fair..."


It's probably fairies.


message 26: by Gary (new)

Gary (plaidchuck) | 55 comments Anyone know, does Kindle Unlimited tend to have a lot of new releases and such? Id consider subscribing for a bit if it would allow me to check out new stuff as it comes out. My reading has ramped up enough in the last year where i think id get my money's worth in a subscription


message 27: by Gary (new)

Gary Gillen | 145 comments I have read 13 books so far this year.
7 were paper books that I borrowed from the library.
3 were e-books purchased from Amazon.
1 was a paper book I bought from Barnes and Noble online with a gift card.
1 e-book was from a free Goodreads Giveaway.
1 e-book was from the Amazon Prime Library.


message 28: by Bobby (new)

Bobby | 869 comments Gary wrote: "Anyone know, does Kindle Unlimited tend to have a lot of new releases and such? Id consider subscribing for a bit if it would allow me to check out new stuff as it comes out. My reading has ramped ..."

I don't know how much you know about it, but Kindle Unlimited is primarily Indie/Self Published authors. It also has the whole Harry Potter series, and The Handmaid's Tale, but those are all I've seen that I recognized.

As for new books, it really depends on the author. Recently on KU, I read two books that had just come out in April, but on the other hand I couldn't get the 5th book in one series, even though the other 4 were available.

They aren't lying about having over a million books, but most of them tend to be from authors you've never heard of. That's not a bad thing, but they don't usually advertise that part. Since I have so many other things to read besides what they offer, I don't think a full subscription is worth it to me, but I do like having a month here and there for a change of pace.


message 29: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 2285 comments Bobby wrote: " I do like having a month here and there for a change of pace. ..."

So, you can choose a month here or there to subscribe to Kindle Unlimited?

I mean, we looked into Audible, and it didn't seem to be worthwhile unless we were going to stick with it for a consecutive full year, if we understood correctly..... Maybe we misunderstood Audible?


message 30: by Don (new)

Don Dunham is constantly mining all available sources.


message 31: by Bobby (new)

Bobby | 869 comments Cheryl wrote: "Bobby wrote: " I do like having a month here and there for a change of pace. ..."

So, you can choose a month here or there to subscribe to Kindle Unlimited?

I mean, we looked into Audible, and ..."

You can cancel Kindle Unlimited at any time, so you just do the monthly subscription, and then cancel it before the month runs out. You can actually cancel it immediately after you pay for the first month, and it won't shut it off until the end of the month you paid for. That way you don't have to worry about forgetting to cancel after the month is up.

I don't really know anything about Audible, so it might be different. I think it has different prices for monthly vs yearly, while Kindle Unlimited is the same price no matter what.


message 32: by John (new)

John | 401 comments Whenever I want an audio book I will normally hit up the library, or interlibrary loan program. I, however, end up reading the book rather than listening, as I only listen while driving, gardening, etc. Which doesn't take up enough time tho finish a book at a reasonable rate.

Just hit a windfall at the local thrift shop. Apparently someone donated a very large sci/fi and fantasy collection. At a dollar a paperback I ended buying a $100 worth. And splurged on an unread Jack Womack first edition HB in excellent condition of Ambient for $3.

One of the reasons I love thrift shops.


message 33: by Jordan (new)

Jordan (justiceofkalr) | 395 comments Everywhere. Acquire all the books!

The library is probably my number one source though because I work there and it is hard not to check out all the intriguing books I see come through. I also heavily use our ebook and digital audiobooks services. I have a ton of Kindle books that I've mostly bought for a couple bucks a pop when they've had sales. And I subscribe to Audible for my long driving commute. I frequent Half-Price Books for a lot of older books that I want to own and I'll buy new books that I'm really excited about from Amazon or my local book store, Joseph Beth. I also tend to buy graphic novels in print format so I can drool over the pretty artwork. I'll even get books in more than one format so I can read them wherever/whenever the mood strikes.


message 34: by CBRetriever (new)

CBRetriever | 4625 comments all the recent articles about bugs (true) and germs (no problem) in books have put me off thrift stores and even libraries:

"Of all the places you'd think to check for bed bugs, I doubt that library books would be at the top of your list. As odd as it sounds, though, libraries and library books are some of the most common places for bed bug infestations. Libraries all over the country have reported bed bug problems this summer, and some have even had to temporarily close to take care of the problem."

https://pet-insects.wonderhowto.com/h...

"In an email, Jesse T. Jacob, M.D., associate professor of medicine and hospital epidemiologist at Emory University Hospital Midtown, says that books and e-readers can be considered fomites, but, "the infection risk is very low."

Asked if it is possible to get sick from touching a library book if, for example, someone with the flu licked their finger to turn the pages, or sneezed and coughed on the book, Jacob replies, "It's possible but unlikely. Influenza can survive on paper and cloth for less than 12 hours. It's usually the respiratory secretions that carry the highest burden of virus, and it would not be expected on spit. So licking a finger and turning a page is likely less contagious than picking your nose and then turning the page!""

https://health.howstuffworks.com/well...


message 35: by Jacqueline (new)

Jacqueline | 2306 comments Lovely CBR....just as well I hardly ever find what I want at the library then. I do get audiobooks on my library app so at least they won’t give me bugs and diseases.


message 36: by Gary (last edited May 30, 2018 06:26PM) (new)

Gary (plaidchuck) | 55 comments Bobby wrote: "I don't know how much you know about it, but Kindle Unlimited is primarily Indie/Self Published authors... "


Thanks for the info Bobby! Well that definitely sounds enticing to have the chance to find all those hidden gems you referenced. I think I can still get the month freebie so I'll definitely check it out much to the chagrin of my growing "to read" pile..


message 37: by John (last edited May 30, 2018 06:33PM) (new)

John | 401 comments CBRetriever wrote: "picking your nose and then turning the page!"

Which I wouldn't put past some of the people I see at the library. But as George Carlin said, "If you kill all the germs around you and live a completely sterile life, then when germs do come along you're not going to be prepared."

Here is a nice little article on the Hygiene Hypothesis.


message 38: by Jim (new)

Jim Stein (jimsteinbooks) | 22 comments eBooks from online library, filling in the gaps with purchases from Amazon. Lately have been getting a couple early reads from authors seeking reviews.


message 39: by Tomas (new)

Tomas Grizzly | 444 comments I am going full Kindle store, mostly focusing on self-published books. Using GR lists and Amazon's recommendations to pick candidates, then look at the ratings and reviews here on GR.


message 40: by Don (new)

Don Dunham I' members a book store name "Safari Books" it was a rambling place where every inch was commendered into makeshift shelves, boxes of books clogged isles and niches. A person could dig and roots for hours. Only a small part was tamed and cataloged, it was awesome !


message 41: by Esther (last edited May 31, 2018 12:50AM) (new)

Esther (eshchory) | 522 comments Phillip wrote: " Obviously that means I read mostly on my Kindle now (something that I scoffed at a few years ago)"

I scoffed a e-books and found them more difficult to read.
Also if I love a book enough to keep it I don't feel it is really mine unless it has a physical presence on my bookshelf.

However I am not a total Luddite so I began practising with e-books on my tablet. I have got to stage where, due to net galley, I am now doing 50/50 e-book and dead tree.

I have also found that I prefer short stories in the electronic version, this is because in a collection or anthology I feel the completist urge to read the whole thing from cover to cover whereas in electronic form each story exists independently and on its own.


message 42: by Esther (new)

Esther (eshchory) | 522 comments John wrote: "CBRetriever wrote: "picking your nose and then turning the page!"

Which I wouldn't put past some of the people I see at the library. But as George Carlin said, "If you kill all the germs around yo..."


Having worked in a library and seen what some people use as bookmarks I sometimes think I should wear gloves when I read library books.


message 43: by Carole-Ann (new)

Carole-Ann (blueopal) | 143 comments Growing up, I used to spend my pocket money on books & kept them in my bedroom. Getting older as a teen I went to the library every week. When I went to college, I had to buy books for study, so it was not too difficult to buy for myself either. This was in the late 60's when SFF was becoming more popular (at least for the nerds/geeks like me who wanted that stuff) :)
Having a family meant I bought children's books; and when they went off to college later, we bought all their required reading in VERY differing subjects.

I bought all my Medieval History books from an academic second-hand place; I took advantage of sales and 3 for 2 offers; I couldn't walk past ANY book shop without buying something - and we're talking all those trees that got chopped up.

It wasn't until 2002 that I started buying e-books from the (very few) on-line publishers, and which I saved on my laptop. And I have one of those very first Kindles too. So for 16 yrs I've been buying on-line, but continuing with those paper books too.

I have over 1k Kindle books, and circa 5k e-books on my laptop. I still have over 1k paper books in my home as well as the 15k'ish downstairs in my shop

So I have masses of books from the last 50+ yrs, as well as some early 20th Century inherited ones. I kept everything I ever bought. And this was how I opened shop in 2011.

And yes, I have read them all (apart from the newer ones still waiting) :)


message 44: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 2285 comments Ty, Bobby, for the info. on KU.
And John, for reminding us that we live in the world, not in bubbles.


message 45: by Dj (new)

Dj | 1972 comments Hmm,
Amazon, for Kindle books, much easier to read on the bus and at work than real books. Just sayin.
Powell's City of Books in Portland OR.
Roberts Books at the Beach in Lincoln City OR

Both the above are New and Used Book Stores. I prefer Roberts, smaller, nicer staff, not as big a selection, but what can you do.


message 46: by Donald (new)

Donald | 240 comments You guys got me curious...

Since January last year, I've checked out 420 books from my two most utilized systems with probably 20 or less from a third that I'm not going to bother checking. Maybe about 40-60 of the books were for my daughter or wife.

I've bought 40 books off Amazon and less than 10 from other eBook providers. I've also bought maybe 10-20 hard covers which wasn't available as eBook or in the library with about half a dozen gifts.

So 80%+ of my reading is driven by the library, and most of the remainder are eBooks which I guess makes sense given my two restrictions:
1) I massively prefer physical books.
2) Space usage is a huge issue.


message 47: by Tina (new)

Tina (teanah) | 55 comments Everywhere.

I take my awesome water resistant e-reader with me everywhere and do about half of my reading on that. Mostly books purchased when kobo has a sale, humble bundles etc. I occasionally preorder a full priced book when I am over the moon excited.

Audible and Libby for audiobooks. Usually science fiction series, and general fiction titles.

I used to order a lot of dead tree books online, but this year I’ve been trying to support my local independent book store. I’ve had them special order in a few things that I really wanted in paper format.

Comixology, Kickstarter, and two local comic book stores for graphic novels/comics. (Probably a quarter of what I read)

I’ve gotten some through goodreads giveaways. Yay free!

I should use the library more. I’m there several times a week, but due dates annoy me and I end up returning about half of my library books unread and over due.


message 48: by John (new)

John | 401 comments Tina wrote: "...I end up returning about half of my library books unread and over due."

The buffet conundrum, everything looks so good and you pick out too much that you possibly never could consume.

It's difficult with libraries as well because when you see it on the shelf and there is no guarantee you will see it again.

Case in point, saw a book I wanted to read, decided I didn't have time to and would get next visit. Next visit it was checked out, so put myself on the waiting list, it went missing/never returned. I finally got to read the book a year later.


message 49: by Sanah (new)

Sanah Shabbir (szs_30) I usually try and get books from the library (physical, ebooks/audiobooks) and my library has a program with a website and app I can use to access my books on the go. Halfprice is a place I go as well or barnes and noble if I have a giftcard.


message 50: by John (new)

John | 401 comments Sanah wrote: "I usually try and get books from the library (physical, ebooks/audiobooks) and my library has a program with a website and app I can use to access my books on the go. Halfprice is a place I go as w..."

Overdrive?


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