Self Criticism Quotes

Quotes tagged as "self-criticism" (showing 1-30 of 44)
J.M. Barrie
“We are all failures- at least the best of us are.”
J.M. Barrie

Colette
“Put down everything that comes into your head and then you're a writer. But an author is one who can judge his own stuff's worth, without pity, and destroy most of it."

(Casual Chance, 1964)”
Colette

Louise L. Hay
“Remember, you have been criticizing yourself for years and it hasn’t worked. Try approving of yourself and see what happens.”
LOUISE L. HAY, You Can Heal Your Life

Louise L. Hay
“You've been criticising yourself for years and it hasn't worked. Try approving of yourself and see what happens.”
Louise Hay

Leszek Kołakowski
“A modern philosopher who has never once suspected himself of being a charlatan must be such a shallow mind that his work is probably not worth reading.”
Leszek Kolakowski, Metaphysical Horror

William Hazlitt
“We are never so much disposed to quarrel with others as when we are dissatisfied with ourselves.”
William Hazlitt, Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims

Will Self
“You know that sickening feeling of inadequacy and over-exposure you feel when you look upon your own empurpled prose? Relax into the awareness that this ghastly sensation will never, ever leave you, no matter how successful and publicly lauded you become. It is intrinsic to the real business of writing and should be cherished.”
Will Self

S.A.R.K.
“Inside Critics

The critical voices in our own heads are far more vicious than what we might hear from the outside. Our "inside critics" have intimate knowledge of us and can zero in on our weakest spots.

You might be told by the critics that you're too fat, too old, too young, not intelligent enough, a quitter, not logical, prone to try too many things...
It's all balderdash!

Some elements of these may be true, and it's completely up to you how they affect you. Inside critics are really just trying to protect you. You can:

Learn to dialogue with them.
Give them new jobs.
Turn them into allies.
You can also dismantle/exterminate them.”
Susan Ariel Rainbow Kennedy (SARK), Creative Companion: How to Free Your Creative Spirit

Malcolm Gladwell
“In life, most of us are highly skilled at suppressing action. All the improvisation teacher has to do is to reverse this skill and he creates very ‘gifted’ improvisers. Bad improvisers block action, often with a high degree of skill. Good improvisers develop action.”
Malcolm Gladwell, Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking

Jean-Yves Leloup
“It [speaking with words that bring about harmony] consists of speaking of what is good about people, instead of what is wrong with them. For some people this is an almost impossible exercise, for they have become totally habituated to speaking critically. We all seem to have a special talent for finding critical things to say about the world, about others, and about ourselves! (117)”
Jean-Yves Leloup, Compassion and Meditation: The Spiritual Dynamic between Buddhism and Christianity

Pete Walker
“I am continuously struck by how frequently the various thought processes of the inner critic trigger overwhelming emotional flashbacks. This is because the PTSD-derived inner critic weds shame and self-hate about imperfection to fear of abandonment, and mercilessly drive the psyche with the entwined serpents of perfectionism and endangerment. Recovering individuals must learn to recognize, confront and disidentify from the many inner critic processes that tumble them back in emotional time to the awful feelings of overwhelming fear, self-hate, hopelessness and self-disgust that were part and parcel of their original childhood abandonment.”
Pete Walker

Stephen King
“...writers are often the worst judges of what they have written.”
Stephen King, Everything's Eventual: 14 Dark Tales

“Flaws.
We all have them. BUT, they are all about perception. What I consider as a flaw may not be what someone else considers as a flaw. To me, a flaws is an imperfection or a fault in MY eyes. I consider my flaws to be things that I do not like about myself and things that I would like to change.”
Horacio Jones

Sarah Waters
“Don't panic. Midway through writing a novel, I have regularly experienced moments of bowel-curdling terror, as I contemplate the drivel on the screen before me and see beyond it, in quick succession, the derisive reviews, the friends' embarrassment, the failing career, the dwindling income, the repossessed house, the divorce . . . Working doggedly on through crises like these, however, has always got me there in the end. Leaving the desk for a while can help. Talking the problem through can help me recall what I was trying to achieve before I got stuck. Going for a long walk almost always gets me thinking about my manuscript in a slightly new way. And if all else fails, there's prayer. St Francis de Sales, the patron saint of writers, has often helped me out in a crisis. If you want to spread your net more widely, you could try appealing to Calliope, the muse of epic poetry, too.”
Sarah Waters

Nathaniel Branden
“In the inner courtroom of my mind, mine is the only judgment that counts.”
Nathaniel Branden, Six Pillars of Self-Esteem

“Mirrors: they show you what you lack, not what you have.”
Marty Rubin

Vernon D. Burns
“I'm not saying the plot doesn't have holes.”
Vernon D. Burns

Jens Christian Grøndahl
“Am I being unfair? Is it only my self-hatred playing me a trick? Self-hatred is a gendered feeling: in a man it makes him a wimp; in a woman it's the natural order to feel defective.”
Jens Christian Grøndahl, Tit er jeg glad

Hina Hashmi
“Self-criticism and negative thoughts about yourself will attract people who reflect this back to you, showing critical behavior and can abuse you physically.”
Hina Hashmi, Your Life A Practical Guide to Happiness Peace and Fulfilment

“The great thing about making yourself the villain is nobody’s likely to contradict you.”
Peter Watts, Echopraxia

Daniel Kahneman
“The expectation of intelligent gossip is a powerful motive for serious self-criticism, more powerful than New Year resolutions to improve one's decision making at work and at home.”
Daniel Kahneman, Thinking, Fast and Slow

Kathleen Tessaro
“Easing back in her seat, Grace watched the children in the playground opposite, coats off, faces flushed, laughing hysterically with pleasure. They were so vividly alive, completely immersed in the game. She tried to recall a time when she'd been that way and realized she couldn't remember when that had been. She'd lost the knack of forgetting herself. Instead she seemed to look down on herself throughout the day, scrutinizing, judging; finding herself wanting more.”
Kathleen Tessaro, The Perfume Collector

“Fear of boredom is the most scathing self-criticism.”
Marty Rubin

Sharon Salzberg
“Mindfulness helps us see the addictive aspect of self-criticism— a repetitive cycle of flaying ourselves again and again, feeling the pain anew.”
Sharon Salzberg, Real Love: The Art of Mindful Connection

Craig D. Lounsbrough
“We must clean the lens of our hearts to see the state of our souls. However, too often the former is too dirty to even know that the latter exists.”
Craig D. Lounsbrough

Brené Brown
“Stop walking through the world looking for confirmation that you don't belong. You will always find it because you've made that your mission. Stop scouring people's faces for evidence that you're not enough. You will always find it because you've made that your goal. True belonging and self-worth are not goods; we don't negotiate their value with the world. The truth about who we are lives in our hearts. Our call to courage is to protect our wild heart against constant evaluation, especially our own. No one belongs here more than you.”
Brené Brown, Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone

“We dedicate most of the time worrying about our deficiencies and self-criticism instead of concentrating on our goals and believing in our destination”
Sunday Adelaja

Pascal Bruckner
“There is no solution for Europe other than deepening the democratic values it invented. It does not need a geographical extension, absurdly drawn out to the ends of the Earth; what it needs is an intensification of its soul, a condensation of its strengths. It is one of the rare places on this planet where something absolutely unprecedented is happening, without its people even knowing it, so much do they take miracles for granted. Beyond imprecation and apology, we have to express our delighted amazement that we live on this continent and not another. Europe, the planet's moral compass, has sobered up after the intoxication of conquest and has acquired a sense of the fragility of human affairs. It has to rediscover its civilizing capabilities, not recover its taste for blood and carnage, chiefly for spiritual advances. But the spirit of penitence must not smother the spirit of resistance. Europe must cherish freedom as its most precious possession and teach it to schoolchildren. It must also celebrate the beauty of discord and divest itself of its sick allergy to confrontation, not be afraid to point out the enemy, and combine firmness with regard to governments and generosity with regard to peoples. In short, it must simply reconnect with the subversive richness of its ideas and the vitality of its founding principles.

Naturally, we will continue to speak the double language of fidelity and rupture, to oscillate between being a prosecutor and a defense lawyer. That is our mental hygiene: we are forced to be both the knife and the wound, the blade that cuts and the hand that heals. The first duty of a democracy is not to ruminate on old evils, it is to relentlessly denounce its present crimes and failures. This requires reciprocity, with everyone applying the same rule. We must have done with the blackmail of culpability, cease to sacrifice ourselves to our persecutors. A policy of friendship cannot be founded on the false principle: we take the opprobrium, you take the forgiveness. Once we have recognized any faults we have, then the prosecution must turn against the accusers and subject them to constant criticism as well. Let us cease to confuse the necessary evaluation of ourselves with moralizing masochism. There comes a time when remorse becomes a second offence that adds to the first without cancelling it. Let us inject in others a poison that has long gnawed away at us: shame. A little guilty conscience in Tehran, Riyadh, Karachi, Moscow, Beijing, Havana, Caracas, Algiers, Damascus, Yangon, Harare, and Khartoum, to mention them alone, would do these governments, and especially their people, a lot of good. The fines gift Europe could give the world would be to offer it the spirit of critical examination that it has conceived and that has saved it from so many perils. It is a poisoned gift, but one that is indispensable for the survival of humanity.”
Pascal Bruckner, The Tyranny of Guilt: An Essay on Western Masochism

Yusif Vəzir Çəmənzəminli
“Avropada dünyada hədsiz-hesabsız mütəfəkkirlər gəlmiş, orada böyük filosoflar, geniş məlumatlı alimlər olmuş; ancaqAvropa tarixində din icad edənlərə rast gəlmədim. Lüter və Qalvin kimi din islahatçıları olmuş, yeni din uyduran olmamışdır. Amma bizim Şərqdə iki eşşəyin arpasını bölməyə qadir olmayanlar belə peyğəmbərlik iddiasına düşmüşlər.”
Yusif Vəzir Çəmənzəminli, Studentlər

Walter Isaacson
“Kissinger would probably be outraged even if he reread his own memoirs, on the grounds that they are not favorable enough.”
Walter Isaacson, American Sketches: Great Leaders, Creative Thinkers, and Heroes of a Hurricane

« previous 1