Rectitude Quotes

Quotes tagged as "rectitude" Showing 1-10 of 10
George Eliot
“O may I join the choir invisible
Of those immortal dead who live again
In minds made better by their presence; live
In pulses stirred to generosity,
In deeds of daring rectitude...”
George Eliot, O May I Join the Choir Invisible! And Other Favourite Poems

Socrates
“We cannot live better than in seeking to become better.”
Socrates

Richard M. Weaver
“Piety is a discipline of the will through respect. It admits the right to exist of things larger than the ego, of things different from the ego.”
Richard M. Weaver, Ideas Have Consequences

Rick Remender
“All these years! All this time with us -- have you learned nothing?!

You only live by the grace of our clan's tenet of forgiveness!

Your judgement is shit!

Rectitude is the bone that gives firmness and stature. Without decency, neither talent nor learning can make the human frame into a samurai.”
Rick Remender, Tokyo Ghost, Vol. 1: Atomic Garden

Rick Remender
“Samurai are born to die.

Death is not a curse to be avoided -- but the natural end of all life. Death is not eternal . . . dishonor is.”
Rick Remender, Tokyo Ghost, Vol. 1: Atomic Garden

Rick Remender
“Bushido refers not only to martial rectitude but personal rectitude. We understand that in serving each other we serve our own interests.

In serving our world, our world serves us. Allowing us to live in harmony with it.”
Rick Remender, Tokyo Ghost, Vol. 1: Atomic Garden

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Rectitude is a perpetual victory, celebrated not by cries of joy but by serenity, which is joy fixed or habitual.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson

“The attitude of gratitude gives you the right rectitude and sound attitude towards life”
Sesan Kareem

Charles Wright
“We filigree and we baste.
But what do the dead care for the fringe of words,
Safe in their suits of milk?
What do they care for the honk and flash of a new style?

And who is to say if the inch of snow in our hearts
Is rectitude enough?”
Charles Wright

“Now this peasant came to petition him a ninth time; he said: “O high steward, my lord! The tongue is men’s stand-balance. It is the balance that detects deficiency. Punish him who should be punished, and none shall equal your rectitude. When falsehood walks it goes astray.”
Miriam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature, Volume I: The Old and Middle Kingdoms