Moby Dick Quotes

Quotes tagged as "moby-dick" Showing 1-30 of 72
Herman Melville
“I try all things, I achieve what I can.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“In one word, Queequeg, said I, rather digressively; hell is an idea first born on an undigested apple-dumpling; and since then perpetuated through the hereditary dyspepsias nurtured by Ramadans.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“There is, one knows not what sweet mystery about this sea, whose gently awful stirrings seem to speak of some hidden soul beneath...”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Sherrilyn Kenyon
“Well . . . he lets it ruin his life. He gets so obsessed with going after the one thing that hurt him that he loses sight of everything else. He becomes isolated from everyone and everything. Paranoid. He feels like he can't trust anyone around him ever. In the end, he loses everything, even his life. And for what? Total stupidity, if you ask me.”
Sherrilyn Kenyon, Invincible

Patrick Ness
“For there are devils in the deep,
but worst are the ones
we make.”
Patrick Ness, And the Ocean Was Our Sky

Herman Melville
“Ahab is for ever Ahab, man. This whole act's immutably decreed. 'Twas rehearsed by thee and me a billion years before this ocean rolled. Fool! I am the Fates' lieutenant, I act under orders.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“From beneath his slouched hat Ahab dropped a tear into the sea; nor did all the Pacific contain such wealth as that one wee drop.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Ray Bradbury
“Shakespeare wrote Moby-Dick, using Melville as a Ouija board.”
Ray Bradbury

Herman Melville
“In life, the visible surface of the Sperm Whale is not the least among the many marvels he presents. Almost invariably it is all over obliquely crossed and re-crossed with numberless straight marks in thick array, something like those in the finest Italian line engravings. But these marks do not seem to be impressed upon the isinglass substance above mentioned, but seem to be seen through it, as if they were engraved upon the body itself. Nor is this all. In some instances, to the quick, observant eye, those linear marks, as in a veritable engraving, but afford the ground for far other delineations. These are hieroglyphical; that is, if you call those mysterious cyphers on the walls of pyramids hieroglyphics, then that is the proper word to use in the present connexion. By my retentive memory of the hieroglyphics upon one Sperm Whale in particular, I was much struck with a plate representing the old Indian characters chiselled on the famous hieroglyphic palisades on the banks of the Upper Mississippi. Like those mystic rocks, too, the mystic-marked whale remains undecipherable.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“But vain to popularize profundities, and all truth is profound.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“One often hears of writers that rise and swell with their subject, though it may seem but an ordinary one. How, then, with me, writing of this Leviathan? Unconsciously my chirography expands into placard capitals. Give me a condor's quill! Give me Vesuvius' crater for an inkstand! Friends, hold my arms! For in the mere act of penning my thoughts of this Leviathan, they weary me, and make me faint with their out-reaching comprehensiveness of sweep, as if to include the whole circle of the sciences, and all the generations of whales, and men, and mastodons, past, present, and to come, with all the revolving panoramas of empire on earth, and throughout the whole universe, not excluding its suburbs. Such, and so magnifying, is the virtue of a large and liberal theme! We expand to its bulk. To produce a mighty book, you must choose a mighty theme. No great and enduring volume can ever be written on the flea, though many there be who have tried it.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“It is the horrible texture of a fabric that should be woven of ships' cables and hawsers. A Polar wind blows through it, and birds of prey hover over it.”
Herman Melville

Eric Jay Dolin
“The heroic and often tragic stories of American whalemen were renowned. They sailed the world’s oceans and brought back tales filled with bravery, perseverance, endurance, and survival. They mutinied, murdered, rioted, deserted, drank, sang, spun yarns, scrimshawed, and recorded their musings and observations in journals and letters. They survived boredom, backbreaking work, tempestuous seas, floggings, pirates, putrid food, and unimaginable cold. Enemies preyed on them in times of war, and competitors envied them in times of peace. Many whalemen died from violent encounters with whales and from terrible miscalculations about the unforgiving nature of nature itself. And through it all, whalemen, those “iron men in wooden boats” created a legacy of dramatic, poignant, and at times horrific stories that can still stir our emotions and animate the most primal part of our imaginations. “To produce a mighty book, you must choose a mighty theme,” proclaimed Herman Melville, and the epic story of whaling is one of the mightiest themes in American history.”
Eric Jay Dolin, Leviathan: The History of Whaling in America

Herman Melville
“but the reason why the grave-digger made music must have been because there was none in his spade”
Herman Melville, Moby Dick

Herman Melville
“in common life we esteem but meanly and contemptibly a fellow who anoints his hair, and palpably smells of that anointing. In truth, a mature man who uses hair-oil, unless medicinally, that man has probably got a quoggy spot in him somewhere. As a general rule, he can't amount to much in his totality.”
Herman Melville

Eric Jay Dolin
“American whale oil lit the world. It was used in the production of soap, textiles, leather, paints, and varnishes, and it lubricated the tools and machines that drove the Industrial Revolution. The baleen cut from the mouths of whales shaped the course of feminine fashion by putting the hoop in hooped skirts and giving form to stomachtightening
and chest-crushing corsets. Spermaceti, the waxy substance from the heads of sperm whales, produced the brightest- and cleanest-burning candles the world has ever known, while ambergris, a byproduct of irritation in a sperm whale’s bowel, gave perfumes great staying power and was worth its weight in gold.”
Eric Jay Dolin, Leviathan: The History of Whaling in America

Herman Melville
“And let me in this place movingly admonish you, ye ship-owners of Nantucket! Beware of enlisting in your vigilant fisheries any lad with lean brow and hollow eye; given to unseasonable meditativeness; and who offers to ship with the Phædon instead of Bowditch in his head. Beware of such an one, I say: your whales must be seen before they can be killed...”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“Songez à la ruse de la mer et à la manière dont ses créatures les plus redoutables glissent sous l’eau, à peu près invisibles, traîtreusement cachées par les plus suaves tons d’azur. Songez à la beauté et à l’éclat satanique de ses plus impitoyables tribus, à la forme exquise de certains
requins. Songez au cannibalisme universel qui règne dans la mer où les créatures de proie s’entre-dévorent, menant une guerre éternelle depuis l’origine du monde.
Songez à tout cela et tournez alors vos regards vers cette terre aimable et verte infiniment docile, songez à l’Océan et à la terre, ne retrouvez-vous pas en vous-même leurs pareils ? Car de même que cet océan de terreur entoure les verts continents, de même l’âme de l’homme enferme une Tahiti, île de paix et de joie, cernée par les horreurs sans nombre d’une vie à demi inconnue.
Que Dieu te garde ! Ne pousse pas au large de cette île, tu n’y pourrais jamais revenir !”
Herman Melville, Moby Dick

Herman Melville
“Why don't ye be sensible, Flask? it's easy to be sensible; why don't ye, then? any man with half an eye can be sensible."
"I don't know that, Stubb. You sometimes find it rather hard.”
Herman Melville

Herman Melville
“Both jaws, like enormous shears, bit the craft completely in twain.”
Herman Melville, Moby Dick Or The Whale

Herman Melville
“Best, therefore, withhold any amazement at the strangely gallied whales before us, for there is no folly of the beasts of the earth which is not infinitely outdone by the madness of men.”
Herman Melville, Moby Dick

Herman Melville
“So man’s insanity is heaven’s sense; and wandering from all mortal reason, man comes to that celestial thought, which, to reason, is absurd and frantic; and weal or woe, feels then uncompromised, indifferent as his God.”
Herman Melville, Moby Dick

Herman Melville
“Jedanput sam, na straži na jarbolu, kad je upravo svanulo i zora purpurnim sjajem zalila i nebo i more, ugledao na istoku veliko jato kitova koji su plovili u pravcu sunca, te su načas zajednički podigli uzdrhtale repne peraje. I meni se u tom trenutku činilo da još nitko živ nije vidio tako golem skup vjernika gdje se klanjaju svojim bogovima, pa ni u Perziji, koja je domovina obožavatelja vatre. Kao što je nekoć Ptolomej Filopater dao svoje svjedočanstvo o afričkom slonu, tako sam u tom trenutku ja bio svjedokom da nema pobožnijeg stvorenja nego što je kit. Naime, prema kazivanju kralja Jube, vojnički su slonovi u stara vremena često pozdravljali izlazak sunca dizanjem surle, a sred najdublje tišine.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“Çünkü melek dediğin kendini sıkı sıkı dizginleyen bir köpek balığından başka bir şey değildir.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“We sing; they sleep—aye, lie down there, like ground-tier butts. At ’em again! There, take this copper-pump, and hail ’em through it. Tell ’em to avast dreaming of their lasses. Tell ’em it’s the resurrection; they must kiss their last, and come to judgment.”
Herman Melville

Herman Melville
“...all evil, to crazy Ahab, were visibly personified, and made practically assailable in Moby Dick. He piled upon the whale’s white hump the sum of all the general rage and hate felt by his whole race from Adam down; and then, as if his chest had been a mortar, he burst his hot heart’s shell upon it.”
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“There is no steady unretracing progress in this life; we do not advance through fixed gradations, and at the last one pause”
Herman Melville

Herman Melville
“And now abating in his flurry, the whale once more rolled out into view! surging from side to side; spasmodically dilating and contracting his spout-hole, with sharp, cracking, agonized respirations. At last, gush after gush of clotted red gore, as if it had been the purple lees of red wine, shot into the frightened air; and falling back again, ran dripping down his motionless flanks into the sea. His heart had burst!

“He’s dead, Mr. Stubb,” said Daggoo.

“Yes; both pipes smoked out!” and withdrawing his own from his mouth, Stubb scattered the dead ashes over the water; and, for a moment, stood thoughtfully eyeing the vast corpse he had made.”
Herman Melville, Moby Dick

“Within the drama the Promethean Ahab challenges the laws of creation and dares to steal divine thunder in order to shape it to his ends, subordinating passive Ishmael to his will. But Ishmael alone has escaped to tell the tale and in that telling is the author of a new creation, subordinating Ahab to his purpose.”
Larzer Ziff, Moby-Dick or, the Whale

Herman Melville
“The weaver-god, he weaves; and by that weaving is deafened, that he hears no mortal voice; and by that humming, we, too, who look on the loom are deafened; and only when we escape it shall we hear the thousand voices that speak through it. " 76”
Herman Melville

« previous 1 3