Kenya Quotes

Quotes tagged as "kenya" (showing 1-30 of 88)
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o
“Our fathers fought bravely. But do you know the biggest weapon unleashed by the enemy against them? It was not the Maxim gun. It was division among them. Why? Because a people united in faith are stronger than the bomb”
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, A Grain of Wheat

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o
“Our people think: I , Wangari, a Kenyan by birth - how can I be a vagrant in my own country as if I were a foreigner.”
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, Devil on the Cross

Binyavanga Wainaina
“When art as an expression starts to appear, without prompting, all over the suburbs and villages of this country, what we are saying is: we are confident enough to create our own living, our own entertainment, our own aesthetic. Such an aesthetic will not be donated to us from the corridors of a university; or from the Ministry of Culture, or by the French Cultural Centre. It will come from the individual creations of a thousand creative people”
Binyavanga Wainaina, Kwani? 01

Binyavanga Wainaina
“I have learned that I, we, are a dollar-a-day people (which is terrible, they say, because a cow in Japan is worth $9 a day). This means that a Japanese cow would be a middle class Kenyan... a $9-a-day cow from Japan could very well head a humanitarian NGO in Kenya. Massages are very cheap in Nairobi, so the cow would be comfortable.”
Binyavanga Wainaina

Kenya Wright
“...my desire for him exploded into a great hunger. I was dizzy with it.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o
“For the first 3 weeks of that month, I was also under internal segregation. This simply meant that no other political prisoner was allowed near me. During meals, I was made to sit apart from the others, often with a guard between us. During my ration of sunshine, I had to sit in my corner, often with a watchful guard to ensure that there was no talking or other contact between me & any of the others. Because we were all on the same block it wasn't easy for the warders to enforce total segregation. The other political prisoners would break through the cordon by shouting across to me or by finding any & every excuse for going past where I was sitting & hurriedly throwing in one or two words of solidarity...This was always touching coming from people who were in no better conditions.”
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, Wrestling with the Devil: A Prison Memoir

Kenya Wright
“I could fall in love with you and have no regrets... I want you so bad. You’ll never understand how much.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

“The year the Europeans seized Jomo Kenyatta (1952), Chepusepa and I were sharing our homestead with Arimo, a Teso, who was a headman of the local road crew. One day, Arimo's son found an ostrich's nest between Amudat and Katabok, while he was watching cattle. There were six eggs, and both of our cowherds took one. The brought the two eggs to our home and put them in the ashes near the fire. After two weeks, they hatched.
I remember the baby ostriches walking about, eating millet and stones. Arimo took care of them, and they grew quite large. One night a leopard got the female, but the male continued to thrive, and Arimo harvested its feathers twice. Then, one day, when it was fully grown, our ostrich wandered into the town of Amudat. A European saw it and asked the people, "Where did this come from?"
"Oh, it is the 'ox' of a man named Arimo, they told him.
The European immediately summoned Arimo to Amudat. "Do you have license to keep an ostrich?" he demanded.
"Of course not!" Arimo replied. "This ostrich doesn't belong to anyone else--it's mine. So why do I need a license?"
But the European decreed,"From this day on, you must not keep this ostrich without a license. If you do, you will go to jail for stealing from the government!"
That was only the beginning. The Europeans have been seizing our pet ostriches ever since. When other people heard about Arimo's trouble, they killed their ostriches so they could at least have the feathers. Another man was so angry, he killed his female ostrich and destroyed all her eggs.”
Pat Robbins

Kenya Wright
“Your arousal is like the sweetest perfume I’ve ever smelled... I can sense it all around me — tingling against my skin, thickening your blood and shoving me off the edge of insanity.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

“There's organized confusion on African roads while driving in the cities. If you want to mess up Afican Cities very easy, just fly in 100 Americans put them on the road and tell them to drive.”
Jidenna

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o
“The Whiteman told of another country beyond the sea where a powerful woman sat on a throne while men and women danced under the shadow of her authority and benevolence. She was ready to spread the shadow to cover the Agikuyu. They laughed at this eccentric man whose skin had been so scalded that the black outside had peeled off. The hot water must have gone into his head.

Nevertheless, his words about a woman on the throne echoed something in the heart, deep down in their history. It was many, many years ago. Then women ruled the land of the Agikuyu. Men had no property, they were only there to serve the whims and needs of the women. Those were hard years. So they waited for women to go to war, they plotted a revolt, taking an oath of secrecy to keep them bound each to each in the common pursuit of freedom. They would sleep with all the women at once, for didn't they know the heroines would return hungry for love and relaxation? Fate did the rest; women were pregnant; the takeover met with little resistance.”
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, A Grain of Wheat

Kenya Wright
“Would she flee if she knew the thoughts I kept in my mind? My hands went to her flat stomach. My fingers sank in the soft tan flesh around her waist. One day her belly would be full of my children and her mind would only be focused on me.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Joseph Kessel
“Le soleil encore doux prenait en écharpe les champs de neige qui s'étageaient au sommet du Kilimandjaro. La brise du matin jouait avec les dernières nuées. Tamisés par ce qui restait de brume, les abreuvoirs et les pâturages qui foisonnaient de mufles et de naseaux, de flancs sombres, dorés, rayés, de cornes droites, aiguës, arquées ou massives, et de trompes et de défenses, composaient une tapisserie fabuleuse suspendue à la grande montagne d'Afrique.”
Joseph Kessel, Le Lion

Kenya Wright
“I’m impressed you left to keep everyone safe.” He tenderly massaged the area above my hipbone with his right thumb.
“I’ve seen vampire men cry and piss their pants after one hour in the sewers by themselves. You’ve been walking most of the day and all alone.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Kenya Wright
“The very thought of him coming so close to tasting you makes me want to split his head in two.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Barack Obama
“I'm also hard at work on plans for the Obama Library. And some have suggested that we put it in my birthplace, but I'd rather keep it in the United States.

Did anybody not see that joke coming? Show of hands.”
Barack Obama

Kenya Wright
“His gaze drank me in and he made no attempt to conceal that fact.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Kenya Wright
“His power sings to your blood. I witnessed your reaction to him just now. He’ll be a king in a few years... And you’ll be his queen.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Kenya Wright
“He growled. The noise echoed through the area. Birds flew from the trees. They appeared like dark dots in the starry sky.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Kenya Wright
“Do you know how hard it’s been to not fuck you this whole journey?" he asked inside my head.
“Why can’t I make love to you? Your husband sent you off to breed with a vampire.” Samuel’s fangs retracted. “Last time I checked, I was a vampire.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Kenya Wright
“I shuddered at the thought of what I would do for her if she asked—kill, steal, desecrate the holy god Ambi, destroy cities and masses of people just at her command.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

“Like Beji, our country is a nation whose citizens has employed crooked means of survival, lives in the expense of others, cares the least about their compatriots, and are ever more than willing to do anything conceivable to plunge every vulnerable life into a pitch-dark abyss! It is, you will realize, a lovely den of hungry wolves whose ugly claws often extend a cold handshake to every beggar in the next turn...”
Levi Cheruo Cheptora

Kenya Wright
“You’ll be my queen.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

“i DO NOT WHY BUT i KEEP THINKING OF YOU, WHAT DID YOU EVER DO TO ME?

I have tried na nikashindwa kukudelete from my system, IMEKATAA.

i KNOW YOU HAVE TRIED TOO, IT LEAVES ME WONDERING WHAT IS THESE.

It can only be explained by the gods.”
Hanimoz Obey

Kenya Wright
“Lay down, please.” Samuel’s voice stroked my ears like a man seducing his lover after they’d suffered a long absence.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Kenya Wright
“Ever since I drank your blood, my head has been crazy... I won’t lie. The connection gives me a lot of power over you. I could read your thoughts and speak to you wherever I am, even several miles away.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Kenya Wright
“And you’re absolutely breathtaking.”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Enock Maregesi
“Wajerumani, hata hivyo, wakati wa utawala wao waliruhusu Kiswahili kiwe lugha halisi ya taifa nchini Tanzania kwa vile hawakukiongea Kiingereza wala hawakukipenda. Ndiyo maana Kiswahili kinazungumzwa zaidi nchini Tanzania kuliko Kenya au Uganda.”
Enock Maregesi

Kenya Wright
“I call you domina because that’s what you are,” Samuel insisted.
“It’s what I was. Now I’m just Brie. What if I only called you pathfinder?”
Kenya Wright, Escape

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o
“For a detained patriot, breaking through the doubled walls of gray silence, attempting even a symbolic link with the outside world, is an act of resistance And resistance--even at the level of merely asserting one's rights, of maintaining one's ideological beliefs in the face of a programmed onslaught--is in fact the only way political prisoners can maintain their sanity and humanity. Resistance is the only means of trying to prevent a breakdown. The difficulty lies in the fact that in this effort one must rely first and foremost on one's own resources (writing defiance on toilet paper for instance), and nobody can teach one how to do it.”
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, Wrestling with the Devil: A Prison Memoir

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