Karachi Quotes

Quotes tagged as "karachi" (showing 1-30 of 32)
Kamila Shamsie
“Her definition of romance was absentminded intimacy, the way someone else's hand stray to your plate of food.
I replied: no, that's just friendship; romance is always knowing exactly where that someone else's hands are. She smiled and said, there was a time I thought that way, too. But at the heart of the romance is the knowledge that those hands may wander off elsewhere, but somehow through luck or destiny or plain blind groping they'll find a way back to you, and maybe you'll be smart enough then to be grateful for everything that's still possible, in spit of your own weaknesses- and his.”
Kamila Shamsie, Kartography

“Living in this city, you developed a certain relationship with violence and news of violence: you expected it, dreaded it, and then when it happened, you worked hard to look away from it, because there was nothing you could do about it - not even grieve, because you knew that it would happen again and maybe in a way that was worse than before. Grieving is possible only when you know you have come to an end, when there is nothing more to follow. This city was full of bottled-up grief.”
Bilal Tanweer, The Scatter Here is too Great

Kamila Shamsie
“How do you eat your roots?”
Kamila Shamsie, Kartography

Kamila Shamsie
“Bijli fails in the dead of night / Won’t help to call “I need a light” / You’re in Karachi now / Oh, oh you’re in Karachi now. / Night is falling and you just cant see / Is this illusion or KESC / You’re in Karachi now”
Kamila Shamsie, Kartography

Omar Shahid Hamid
“Constantine cursed the faujis again, and then he cursed Tom Cruise for having made that bloody Top Gun movie. Since then, an entire generation of faujis had grown up thinking they could be like him just by buying those cheap rip-off sunglasses for 200 rupees from Zainab Market.”
Omar Shahid Hamid, The Prisoner

Kamila Shamsie
“And yet. When I read the Dawn on line and then looked around me to the pristine surroundings of campus life, I knew that every other city in the world only showed me its surface, but when I looked at Karachi I saw the blood running through and out of its veins; I knew that I understood the unspoken as much as the articulated among its inhabitants; I knew that there were so many reasons to fail to love it, to cease to love it, to be unable to love it, that it made love a fierce and unfathomable thing; I knew I couldn’t think of Karachi and find any easy answers, and I didn’t know how to decide if that was reason to go back or reason to stay away.”
Kamila Shamsie, Kartography

Umair Naeem
“This was the Karachi now – barbed wires protecting consulates, the pretentious covering themselves with faces of those who were hiding behind those barbed wires. This was Karachi – gaudy and luxurious, with a façade of glamor, ignoring the truth underneath. But Sophie was no cynic, and still loved the city she had returned to. ‘You can’t hate what’s yours,’ she smiled to herself.”
Umair Naeem, Drowning Shadows

Kamila Shamsie
“All around us, Karachi kept moving”
Kamila Shamsie, Kartography

Kamila Shamsie
“If we had more reliable systems of law and governance perhaps our friendship would be shallower.”
Kamila Shamsie, Kartography

Kamila Shamsie
“Coming back to Karachi is like stepping into the sea again after months on land. How easily you float, how peaceful is the sense of being borne along, and how familiar the sound of the water lapping against your limbs.”
Kamila Shamsie, Salt and Saffron

“You see, my son, a city is all about how you look at it...We must learn to see it in many ways, so that when one of the ways of looking hurts us, we can take refuge in another way of looking. You must always love the city.”
Bilal Tanweer, The Scatter Here Is Too Great

“We must learn to see it in many ways, so that when one of the ways of looking hurts us, we can take refuge in another way of looking. You must always love the city.”
Bilal Tanweer

“Ever seen a bullet-smashed windscreen?
The hole at the center becomes an eye. You see less through it but you gain focus, sharpness. That's how it is -- our wounds become our eyes. Seeing outside becomes seeing inside.
Listen.”
Bilal Tanweer, The Scatter Here Is Too Great

“for the first time I am confronted with the fact that places and people are like things: both made of memories and meaningful to us in the same way: we construct ourselves in our conversations with them.”
Bilal Tanweer, The Scatter Here Is Too Great

Saad Shafqat
“The morning drive in Karachi was nothing like coasting on Storrow, but it hadn't taken Asad long to get used to it and it rarely bothered him now. Dreadful road manners were part of the traffic landscape in Karachi. Vehicles changed lanes without warning, motorcyclists zigzagged in and out, camel and donkey carts fought for road space, rickshaws spewed carbon and sulfur fumes, jaywalkers kept popping up from nowhere, and beggars, beggars and more beggars congregated at every traffic light.”
Saad Shafqat, Breath of Death

Saad Shafqat
“Summer in Karachi is brutal. The heat alone is ugly and unforgiving. Add unrelenting humidity, and the elements become merciless. The city sits on the sea but is surrounded by desert land that has been known to reach some of the hottest temperatures anywhere. When the heat reaches its peak, you feel baked in an oven and the thick, humid air gives everything an extra, hot skin. It's an effort to even lift your finger. You could get by with air-conditioning, but in this teeming, overpopulated Third World megapolis, it is a luxury few can afford.”
Saad Shafqat, Breath of Death

“What appears strange and complex becomes stranger and more complicated once you begin to investigate it. That's the true nature of the world.”
Bilal Tanweer

“That was the strange problem with writing, you had discovered. Meaning never matched the words and words always evaded the thought.”
Bilal Tanweer, The Scatter Here Is Too Great

“Things taste sweeter when you have some hunger left to linger. You feel it hunting your head for buried things; digging into the fractures of your breath warm and greedy.”
Bilal Tanweer, The Scatter Here Is Too Great

“My dear, you are not one person. You have many people in you, and each one can ask only some kinds of questions.”
Bilal Tanweer, The Scatter Here Is Too Great

“people who ran away are friends!”
Bilal Tanweer, The Scatter Here Is Too Great

“I hid myself behind Baba. It was like being in the shadow. Shadows are empty places in things. The colour of shadow is also black, which is the color of empty things. Blackboard is also black when it is empty No one can draw shadows on blackboards because shadows keep on changing. You cannot draw changing things. But it happens, you know; you draw and you look and it has changed.”
Bilal Tanweer, The Scatter Here Is Too Great

“Now, standing here, it is clear as day: more than anything else, you want to find words for what you feel and think and everything that is dark. And then this terrifying thought hits you: Yes, your father wrote poetry to find a language for his wounds. Yes, you in your own way have become your father”
Bilal Tanweer, The Scatter Here Is Too Great

“a city is all about how you look at it”
Bilal Tanweer

Steve Inskeep
“From 1947, the country had unwittingly conducted a vast human experiment: what would happen if a diverse place suddenly cleansed itself of many of its minorities, so that almost everyone was, on the surface, the same?

Now the results of the experiment were coming in.

Muslims, the single "nation" championed by their leaders just a few years before, proved to be strikingly diverse. They always had been. Now some looked within their numbers and began singling out new minorities to replace the ones they had lost.”
Steve Inskeep, Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi

Steve Inskeep
“Jinnah told my father", he (Ardeshir Cowasjee) said, "that each government of Pakistan would be worse than the one that preceded it.”
Steve Inskeep, Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi

Steve Inskeep
“Karachi has been a destination for some of the most dramatic migrations of all.”
Steve Inskeep, Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi

Steve Inskeep
“If you come to Karachi for a few days you will hate it, but if you come to Karachi for forty days, you will love it and never want to leave.”
Steve Inskeep, Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi

Steve Inskeep
“Is it possible to leave Karachi after living here for so long?”
Steve Inskeep, Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi

Steve Inskeep
“When we build a city, we take our grandest dreams as well as our deepest anxieties and set them in concrete for the next generation.”
Steve Inskeep, Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi

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