Haughty Quotes

Quotes tagged as "haughty" Showing 1-13 of 13
Richelle E. Goodrich
“A session of boasting won't attract any real friends.  It will set you up on a pedestal, however, making you a clearer target.”
Richelle E. Goodrich, Smile Anyway: Quotes, Verse, and Grumblings for Every Day of the Year

Erik Pevernagie
“For some, life may be a playground to undermine the brainwaves of others or simply a vainglorious game with an armory of theatrics, illustrating only bleak self-deception, haughty narcissism and dim deficiency in empathy. ("Another empty room")”
Erik Pevernagie

Michael Bassey Johnson
“Act as if you don't know me, and i will make it seem as though you don't exist.”
Michael Bassey Johnson

Michael Bassey Johnson
“Those who incessantly underestimate people will one day experience an incident that would make them want to plead everyone they had offended in the world.”
Michael Bassey Johnson

Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly
“She was one of those women of good family who no longer exist, elegant, distinguished, and haughty, whose pallor and thinness seem to say, 'I am conquered by the era, like all my breed. I am dying, but I despise you,' and - devil take me! - plebeian as I am, and though it is not very philosophical , I cannot help finding that beautiful.”
Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly, Le bonheur dans le crime

Sanjo Jendayi
“Pedestals aren't safe...one wrong move and a nasty tumble is sure to follow. Humility is a great grounding tool.”
Sanjo Jendayi

Mehmet Murat ildan
“Haughtiness is the high heel shoe of the low men!”
Mehmet Murat ildan

“If you have not seen the real end of the journey, don’t boast much at the beginning and never be too proud and haughty in mid of the path. Keep the real end in mind and mind how to get to the real end successfully!”
Ernest Agyemang Yeboah

Mehmet Murat ildan
“Even if you are the Sun itself, don’t be haughty, because you will nevertheless die down!”
Mehmet Murat ildan

“Humility carries less weight and it makes things float. Pride is weighty and it makes things sink! It takes humility then for a ‘ship’, regardless of how loaded it is, to float on the surface of the ‘sea’. And it takes pride for the ‘small stone’ to sink when dropped into the ‘sea’! Go with humility then!”
Ernest Agyemang Yeboah

Donna Morrissey
“Suppose none of us ever left — how would we ever create new ways if we're held back in the old?"

Mother balked. "And what do you think happens to us who never leaves home, Sylvie — you think we grows stagnant like bog water? Sir, the things she says."

"I didn't mean it like that —"

"Praise the lord, I hope not, for there's not a minute in a day when the water's not changing its colour or the wind don't touch me differently. You don't have to go off to find newness, if that's what you're saying. Newness grows out of every day — no matter where you're standing, for them with eyes to see it.”
Donna Morrissey, What They Wanted

Vincent Okay Nwachukwu
“When a person becomes haughty, his root is traced and exposed. Woe betides him if his origin has skeletons.”
Vincent Okay Nwachukwu, Weighty 'n' Worthy African Proverbs - Volume 1

Stacey Ballis
“Stupid dog, do you realize you have actually LITERALLY bitten the hand that feeds you?"
Schatzi looks at me with a withering stare, arching her bushy eyebrows haughtily, and then turns her back to me. I stick out my tongue at her back, and go to the kitchen to freshen her water bowl. Damnable creature requires fresh water a zillion times a day. God forbid a fleck of dust is dancing on the surface, or it has gone two degrees beyond cool, I get the laser look of death. Once there was a dead fly in it, and she looked in the bowl, crossed the room, looked me dead in the eye, and squatted and peed on my shoes. I usually call her Shitzi or Nazi. I suppose I'm lucky she deigns to drink tap water. Our bare tolerance of each other is mutual, and affection between us is nil. The haughty little hellbeast was my sole inheritance from my grandmother who passed away two years ago. A cold, exacting woman who raised me in my mother's near-complete absence, Annelyn Stroudt insisted on my calling her Grand-mère, despite the fact that she put the manic in Germanic, ancestry-wise. But apparently when her grandparents schlepped here mother from Berlin to Chicago, they took a year in Paris first, and adopted many things Française. So Grand-mère it was.
Grand-mère Annelyn also insisted on dressing for dinner, formal manners in every situation, letterpress stationary, and physical affection saved for the endless string of purebred miniature schnauzers she bought one after the other, and never offered to the granddaughter who also lived under her roof. Her clear disappointment in me must have rubbed off on Schatzi, who, despite having lived with me since Grand-mère died neatly and quietly in her sleep at the respectable age of eighty-nine, has never seen me as anything but a source of food, and a firm hand at the end of the leash. She dotes on Grant, but he sneaks her nibbles when he cooks, and coos to her in flawless French. Sometimes I wonder if the spirit of Grand-mère transferred into the dog upon death, and if the chilly indifference to me is just a manifestation of my grandmother's continued disapproval from beyond the grave.
Schatzi wanders over to her bowl, sniffs it, sneers at me one last time for good measure, shakes her head to ensure her ears are in place, like a society matron checking her coif, and settles down to drink.”
Stacey Ballis, Recipe for Disaster