Entropy Quotes

Quotes tagged as "entropy" Showing 1-30 of 96
“I mean, I don’t know how the world broke. And I don’t know if there’s a God who can help us fix it. But the fact that the world is broken - I absolutely believe that. Just look around us. Every minute - every single second - there are a million things you could be thinking about. A million things you could be worrying about. Our world - don’t you just feel we’re becoming more fragmented? I used to think that when I got older, the world would make so much more sense. But you know what? The older I get, the more confusing it is to me. The more complicated it is. Harder. You’d think we’d be getting better at it. But there’s just more and more chaos. The pieces - they’re everywhere. And nobody knows what to do about it. I find myself grasping, Nick. You know that feeling? That feeling when you just want the right thing to fall into the right place, not only because it’s right, but because it would mean that such a thing is still possible? I want to believe that.”
Rachel Cohn, Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist

Michael Ende
“Nothing is lost. . .Everything is transformed.”
Michael Ende, The Neverending Story

John Green
“Everything that comes together falls apart. Everything. The chair I’m sitting on. It was built, and so it will fall apart. I’m gonna fall apart, probably before this chair. And you’re gonna fall apart. The cells and organs and systems that make you you—they came together, grew together, and so must fall apart. The Buddha knew one thing science didn’t prove for millennia after his death: Entropy increases. Things fall apart.”
John Green, Looking for Alaska

Philip K. Dick
“Just because something bears the aspect of the inevitable one should not, therefore, go along willingly with it.”
Philip K. Dick, The Transmigration of Timothy Archer

Susane Colasanti
“Things fall apart, even when you think they're stronger than anything you could ever imagine.”
Susane Colasanti, Waiting for You

Philip K. Dick
“No structure, even an artificial one, enjoys the process of entropy. It is the ultimate fate of everything, and everything resists it.”
Philip K. Dick, Galactic Pot-Healer

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
“I am the spirit that negates.
And rightly so, for all that comes to be
Deserves to perish wretchedly;
'Twere better nothing would begin.
Thus everything that that your terms, sin,
Destruction, evil represent—
That is my proper element.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust - Part One

Jenny Offill
“This is another way in which he is an admirable person. If he notices something is broken, he will try to fix it. He won’t just think about how unbearable it is that things keep breaking, that you can never fucking outrun entropy.”
Jenny Offill, Dept. of Speculation

“THOMASINA: ....the enemy who burned the great library of Alexandria without so much as a fine for all that is overdue. Oh, Septimus! -- can you bear it? All the lost plays of the Athenians! Two hundred at least by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides -- thousands of poems -- Aristotle's own library!....How can we sleep for grief?

SEPTIMUS: By counting our stock. Seven plays from Aeschylus, seven from Sophocles, nineteen from Euripides, my lady! You should no more grieve for the rest than for a buckle lost from your first shoe, or for your lesson book which will be lost when you are old. We shed as we pick up, like travellers who must carry everything in their arms, and what we let fall will be picked up by those behind. The procession is very long and life is very short. We die on the march. But there is nothing outside the march so nothing can be lost to it. The missing plays of Sophocles will turn up piece by piece, or be written again in another language. Ancient cures for diseases will reveal themselves once more. Mathematical discoveries glimpsed and lost to view will have their time again. You do not suppose, my lady, that if all of Archimedes had been hiding in the great library of Alexandria, we would be at a loss for a corkscrew?”
Tom Stoppard, Arcadia

“When you stir your rice pudding, Septimus, the spoonful of jam spreads itself round making red trails like the picture of a meteor in my astronomical atlas. But if you stir backwards, the jam will not come together again. Indeed, the pudding does not notice and continues to turn pink just as before. Do you think this is odd?”
Tom Stoppard, Arcadia

Brandon Sanderson
“Entropy shakes its angry fist at you for being clever enough to organize the world. (p 2)”
Brandon Sanderson, Alcatraz Versus the Knights of Crystallia

Philip K. Dick
“Too bad. And Mozart, not long after writing The Magic Flute, had died--in his thirties--of kidney disease. And had been buried in an unmarked pauper's grave.

Thinking this, he wondered if Mozart had any intuition that the future did not exist, that he had already used up his little time. Maybe I have too, Rick thought as he watched the rehearsal move along. This rehearsal will end, the performance will end, the singers will die, eventually the last score of the music will be destroyed in one way or another; finally the name "Mozart" will vanish, the dust will have won. If not on this planet then another. We can evade it awhile. As the andys can evade me and exist a finite stretch longer. But I will get them or some other bounty hunter gets them. In a way, he realized, I'm part of the form-destroying process of entropy.”
Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Václav Havel
“Just as the constant increase of entropy is the basic law of the universe, so it is the basic law of life to be ever more highly structured and to struggle against entropy.”
Václav Havel

James Gleick
“We all behave like Maxwell’s demon. Organisms organize. In everyday experience lies the reason sober physicists across two centuries kept this cartoon fantasy alive. We sort the mail, build sand castles, solve jigsaw puzzles, separate wheat from chaff, rearrange chess pieces, collect stamps, alphabetize books, create symmetry, compose sonnets and sonatas, and put our rooms in order, and all this we do requires no great energy, as long as we can apply intelligence. We propagate structure (not just we humans but we who are alive). We disturb the tendency toward equilibrium. It would be absurd to attempt a thermodynamic accounting for such processes, but it is not absurd to say we are reducing entropy, piece by piece. Bit by bit. The original demon, discerning one molecules at a time, distinguishing fast from slow, and operating his little gateway, is sometimes described as “superintelligent,” but compared to a real organism it is an idiot savant. Not only do living things lessen the disorder in their environments; they are in themselves, their skeletons and their flesh, vesicles and membranes, shells and carapaces, leaves and blossoms, circulatory systems and metabolic pathways - miracles of pattern and structure. It sometimes seems as if curbing entropy is our quixotic purpose in the universe.”
James Gleick, The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood

Alexander Pope
“Nor public flame, nor private, dares to shine;
Nor human spark is left, nor glimpse divine!
Lo! thy dread empire, Chaos! is restored;
Light dies before thy uncreating word:
Thy hand, great Anarch! lets the curtain fall;
And universal darkness buries all.”
Alexander Pope, The Dunciad

Jeremy Rifkin
“Time goes forward because energy itself is always moving from an available to an unavailable state. Our consciousness is continually recording the entropy change in the world around us. We watch our friends get old and die. We sit next to a fire and watch it's red-hot embers turn slowly into cold white ashes. We experience the world always changing around us, and that experience is the unfolding of the second law. It is the irreversible process of dissipation of energy in the world. What does it mean to say, 'The world is running out of time'? Simply this: we experience the passage of time by the succession of one event after another. And every time an event occurs anywhere in this world energy is expended and the overall entropy is increased. To say the world is running out of time then, to say the world is running out of usable energy. In the words of Sir Arthur Eddington, 'Entropy is time's arrow'.”
Jeremy Rifkin, Entropy

“You should never be surprised by or feel the need to explain why any physical system is in a high entropy state.”
Brian Greene, The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality

Derrick Jensen
“The global industrial economy is the engine for massive environmental degradation and massive human (and nonhuman) impoverishment.”
Derrick Jensen, Endgame, Vol. 1: The Problem of Civilization

Fritz Leiber
“Franz said 'Your picture, Viki, suggests that sense of breaking-up we feel in the modern world. Families, nations, classes, other loyalty groups falling apart. Things changing before you get to know them. Death on the installment plan – or decay by jumps. Instantaneous birth. Something out of nothing. Reality replacing science fiction so fast that you can't tell which is which. Constant sense of deja-vu - 'I was here before, but when, how?' Even the possibility that there's no real continuity between events, just inexplicable gaps. And of course every gap – every crack – means a new perching place for horror.”
Fritz Leiber

Jodi Picoult
“Jacob's room is the place entropy goes to die.”
Jodi Picoult, House Rules

Brian Christian
“Information, defined intuitively and informally, might be something like 'uncertainty's antidote.' This turns out also to be the formal definition- the amount of information comes from the amount by which something reduces uncertainty...The higher the [information] entropy, the more information there is. It turns out to be a value capable of measuring a startling array of things- from the flip of a coin to a telephone call, to a Joyce novel, to a first date, to last words, to a Turing test...Entropy suggests that we gain the most insight on a question when we take it to the friend, colleague, or mentor of whose reaction and response we're least certain. And it suggests, perhaps, reversing the equation, that if we want to gain the most insight into a person, we should ask the question of qhose answer we're least certain... Pleasantries are low entropy, biased so far that they stop being an earnest inquiry and become ritual. Ritual has its virtues, of course, and I don't quibble with them in the slightest. But if we really want to start fathoming someone, we need to get them speaking in sentences we can't finish.”
Brian Christian, The Most Human Human: What Talking with Computers Teaches Us About What It Means to Be Alive

James Gleick
“For Wiener, entropy was a measure of disorder; for Shannon, of uncertainty. Fundamentally, as they were realizing, these were the same.”
James Gleick, The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood

Mark O'Connell
“I’d begun to think of the Immortality Bus as the Entropy Bus, and of ourselves as trundling across Texas in a great mobile metaphor for the inevitable decline of all things, the disintegration of all systems over time.”
Mark O'Connell, To Be a Machine : Adventures Among Cyborgs, Utopians, Hackers, and the Futurists Solving the Modest Problem of Death

“Death always seems to come for you whether you are machine or organic, entropy seem to always win.

Maybe that's the lesson we all need to learn before it’s too late. Time is precious to us and we need to live and love while we can still do so.”
L.B. Ó Ceallaigh, Souls' Inverse

Thomas Pynchon
“Consider coal and steel. There is a place where they meet. The interface between coal and steel is coal-tar. Imagine coal, down in the earth, dead black, no light, the very substance of death. Death ancient, prehistoric, species we will never see again. Growing older, blacker, deeper, in layers of perpetual night. Above ground, the steel rolls out fiery, bright. But to make steel, the coal tars, darker and heavier, must be taken from the original coal. Earth's excrement, purged out for the ennoblement of shining steel. Passed over.”
Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

Chuck Palahniuk
“All around us, erosion and insects are just chewing up the world, never mind people and pollution. Everything biodegrades with or without you pushing.”
Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters

“Imagine God as a mirror. The Devil is the shattered mirror, exploded into a myriad of splinters. God as a single mirror is made up of countless individual minds, but they are so harmonized, so integrated, so symmetrical, that they are indistinguishable and constitute a perfect Unity. However, when the perfect mirror breaks, it breaks everywhere, disconnecting every mind from the perfect hive. The perfect mirror has zero entropy. The exploded mirror has maximum entropy. Entropy is the Devil. Entropy is matter. Once the mirror - as a living entity - has broken, it needs to reconstitute itself, like a jigsaw puzzle. It needs to recreate God. That is the goal and meaning of existence.”
Harry Knox, God Is a Hive Mind: The Cellular Divinity

“Messy arrangements far outweigh orderly ones.”
Brian Greene, Until the End of Time: Mind, Matter, and Our Search for Meaning in an Evolving Universe

“There is only oneself in relationship with itself.”
Wald Wassermann

“It is correct to note that the initial stage of cosmic inflation was incredibly smooth and orderly pointing to an initial state of zero or near-zero entropy. It is even more correct to note that self moved itself so not to be by itself and this for the purpose so self could experience companionship, friendship, love. Hence why zero became zorro. Meaning? Self masks as in veils itself so not to be by itself with the purpose of self being love. Very true. Truly simple. The purpose of self is love.”
Wald Wassermann

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