Edinburgh Quotes

Quotes tagged as "edinburgh" Showing 1-26 of 26
Alexander McCall Smith
“This is a city of shifting light, of changing skies, of sudden vistas. A city so beautiful it breaks the heart again and again.”
Alexander McCall Smith

Alexander McCall Smith
“This was a townscape raised in the teeth of cold winds from the east; a city of winding cobbled streets and haughty pillars; a city of dark nights and candlelight, and intellect.”
Alexander McCall Smith, The Sunday Philosophy Club

Jess Walter
“If London was an alien city, Edinburgh was another planet”
Jess Walter, Beautiful Ruins

Robert Louis Stevenson
“Half a capital and half a country town, the whole city leads a double existence; it has long trances of the one and flashes of the other; like the king of the Black Isles, it is half alive and half a monumental marble.”
Robert Louis Stevenson, Edinburgh: Picturesque Notes

Mark Knopfler
“The drinking dens are spilling out
There's staggering in the square
There's lads and lasses falling about
And a crackling in the air
Down around the dungeon doors
The shelters and the queues
Everybody's looking for
Somebody's arms to fall into
And it's what it is
It's what it is now

There's frost on the graves and the monuments
But the taverns are warm in town
People curse the government
And shovel hot food down
The lights are out in the city hall
The castle and the keep
The moon shines down upon it all
The legless and asleep

And it's cold on the tollgate
With the wagons creeping through
Cold on the tollgate
God knows what I could do with you
And it's what it is
It's what it is now

The garrison sleeps in the citadel
With the ghosts and the ancient stones
High up on the parapet
A Scottish piper stands alone
And high on the wind
The highland drums begin to roll
And something from the past just comes
And stares into my soul

And it's cold on the tollgate
With the Caledonian Blues
Cold on the tollgate
God knows what I could do with you
And it's what it is
It's what it is now
What it is
It's what it is now

There's a chink of light, there's a burning wick
There's a lantern in the tower
Wee Willie Winkie with a candlestick
Still writing songs in the wee wee hours
On Charlotte Street I take
A walking stick from my hotel
The ghost of Dirty Dick
Is still in search of Little Nell
And it's what it is
It's what it is now
Oh what it is
What it is now”
Mark Knopfler, Sailing to Philadelphia

James Hogg
“An exaltation of spirit lifted me, as it were, far above the earth and the sinful creatures crawling on its surface; and I deemed myself as an eagle among the children of men, soaring on high, and looking down with pity and contempt on the grovelling creatures below.”
James Hogg

James Hogg
“The attendance of that brother was now become like the attendance of a demon on some devoted being that had sold himself to destruction”
James Hogg, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner

Maggie O'Farrell
“Edinburgh suited Ann; she liked the tall, dignified buildings of grey stone, the short days that sank into street-lamped evenings at five o'clock, and the dual personality of the city's main street, which on one side had glittering shops and on the other the green sweep of Princes Street Gardens.”
Maggie O'Farrell, After You'd Gone

Mrs. Oliphant
“Brentwood stands on that fine and wealthy slope of country, one of the richest in Scotland, which lies between the Pentland Hills and the Firth. In clear weather you could see the blue gleam-like a bent bow, embracing the wealthy fields and scattered houses of the great estuary on one side of you; and on the other the blue heights, not gigantic like those we had been used to, but just high enough for all the glories of the atmosphere, the play of clouds, and sweet reflections, which give to a hilly country an interest and a charm which nothing else can emulate. Edinburgh, with its two lesser heights - the Castle and the Calton Hill - its spires and towers piercing through the smoke, and Arthur's Seat lying crouched behind, like a guardian no longer very needful, taking his repose beside the well-beloved charge, which is now, so to speak, able to take care of itself without him - lay at our right hand. From the lawn and drawing-room windows we could see all these varieties of landscape. The colour was sometimes a little chilly, but sometimes, also, as animated and full of vicissitude as a drama. I was never tired of it. Its colour and freshness revived the eyes which had grown weary of arid plains and blazing skies. It was always cheery, and fresh, and full of repose. ("The Open Door")”
Margaret Oliphant, The Gentlewomen of Evil: An Anthology of Rare Supernatural Stories from the Pens of Victorian Ladies

Martin  Hopkins
“Join us. Play the game. It will bring you an untold number of rewards and you will finally have some direction and purpose in your lives. Take control of yourselves and those around you. Bend them to your will and all worldly pleasures will be yours...”
Martin Hopkins, Cracks in the Pavement

Sara Sheridan
“Edinburgh is alive with words.”
Sara Sheridan

Sara Sheridan
“Edinburgh is a great big black bastard of a city where there are ghosts of all kinds.”
Sara Sheridan, Ma Polinski's Pockets

Ian Rankin
“From this height the sleeping city seems like a child's construction, a model which has refused to be constrained by imagination. The volcanic plug might be black Plasticine, the castle balanced solidly atop it a skewed rendition of crenellated building bricks. The orange street lamps are crumpled toffee-wrappers glued to lollipop sticks.”
Ian Rankin

Jacqueline E. Smith
“After walking the Royal Mile, we visit Edinburgh Castle. Overlooking the city from the grassy hilltop of the Castle Rock, the fortress itself looks as though it has been carved from the very stone upon which it sits. It is powerful yet elegant, lavish yet wholly inviting to anyone fortunate enough to find themselves standing at the castle gate. These are doors and walls and windows that have seen kings and queens, saints and sinners, voyagers from all corners of the world. And now us.”
Jacqueline E. Smith, Trashy Romance Novel

Jacqueline E. Smith
“I haven’t even been here an hour and already, Edinburgh is the city of my dreams.”
Jacqueline E. Smith, Trashy Romance Novel

Martin  Hopkins
“Nothing is ‘wrong’ with me, Dan. What’s wrong with you? she said in the same eerily quiet voice, dark eyes fixated on Dan, as she breathed heavily.”
Martin Hopkins, Cracks in the Pavement

Martin  Hopkins
“The slick concrete reflected the facades of the work weary - grey, cracked and old,
but more importantly, trodden upon.”
Martin Hopkins, Cracks in the Pavement

Sara Sheridan
“The writing talent of Edinburgh is textured - we have poets, novelists, non-fiction writers, dramatists and more.”
Sara Sheridan

Sara Sheridan
“Edinburgh is a comfortable puddle for a novelist.”
Sara Sheridan

Alexander McCall Smith
“...Pat wondered what inspiration an artist might find in the attempts of twenty-first-century architects to impose their phallic triumphs on the cityscape. Had any artist ever painted a contemporary glass block, for instance, or any other product of architectural brutalism that had laid its crude hands here and there upon the city?...If a building did not lend itself to being painted, then surely that must be because it was inherently ugly, whatever its claims to utility. And if it was ugly, then what was it doing in this delicately beautiful city?”
Alexander McCall Smith, Bertie Plays the Blues

Jacqueline E. Smith
“There, standing before the mausoleum, Michael’s anxiety skyrocketed. His heart raced. His head spun. His stomach turned. For a few moments, he really thought he was going to have to run to the bushes and puke. He’d never heard of a ghost being able to actually curse someone, but he didn’t want to risk it by vomiting on Bluidy Mackenzie’s front lawn.”
Jacqueline E. Smith, Lost Souls

Alexander  Thomson
“Donaldson's Hospital in Edinburgh, of which great things were expected, fails to excite even a passing remark; while the High School, the fragments of the National Monument, Dugald Stewart's Monument, Surgeon's Hall, and the Institution on the Mound, continue to illuminate their respective localities with the light of truth and beauty, giving to our northern metropolis an air of refinement which no other city in the kingdom possesses.”
Alexander Thomson, The Light of Truth and Beauty: The Lectures of Alexander 'Greek' Thomson, Architect, 1817 - 1875

Hugo Arnot
“There is a species of taverns of a lower denomination, which, however, are sometimes resorted to by good company, when disposed to enjoy a frolic. These are the oyster-cellars, a sort of ale-houses, where the proper entertainment of the house is oysters, punch and porter. Most of the oyster-houses have a sort of long room, where a small party may enjoy the exercise of a country dance, to the music of a fiddle, harp, or bag-pipe. But the equivocal character of these houses of resort prevents them from being visited by any of the fair sex who seek the praise of delicacy, or pique themselves on propriety of conduct.”
Hugo Arnot, The History of Edinburgh

James Cadenhead
“Edinburgh is a beautiful town no doubt, but in winter weather there is a waght of misery and wretchedness all about. Princes Street is very pretty & flashy & shoppy, but the grand old High Street is a most depressing place. The tall houses have an air of depressed nobility much more revolting than mere poverty, like a cast off chimney pot hat on an Irish scaffy.”
James Cadenhead, James Cadenhead RSA RSW, 1858 - 1927: his letters home as a young man

“People don’t live in Edinburgh to work, they work to live there.”
Fuad Alakbarov

Angus Calder
“The Scottish Enlightenment with which Scott grew up became less and less peripheral as Edinburgh became a publishing centre to rival and even eclipse London and as the triumphs of its literati harmonised with those of British imperialism. Before it was consumed by it, Edinburgh culture contributed gladly to 'British' culture, and helped to reshape it. Its thinkers and artists found and knew their place in 'History' as it proceeded.”
Angus Calder, Cencrastus No. 13: Summer 1983