Dresses Quotes

Quotes tagged as "dresses" (showing 1-30 of 31)
Coco Chanel
“Dress shabbily and they remember the dress; dress impeccably and they remember the woman.”
Coco Chanel

Yves Saint-Laurent
“Over the years I have learned that what is important in a dress is the woman who is wearing it.”
Yves Saint-Laurent

Isabel Wolff
“What I really love about them... is the fact that they contain someone's personal history...I find myself wondering about their lives. I can never look at a garment... without thinking about the woman who owned it. How old was she? Did she work? Was she married? Was she happy?... I look at these exquisite shoes, and I imagine the woman who owned them rising out of them or kissing someone...I look at a little hat like this, I lift up the veil, and I try to imagine the face beneath it... When you buy a piece of vintage clothing you're not just buying the fabric and thread - you're buying a piece of someone's past.”
Isabel Wolff, A Vintage Affair

Alfred Tennyson
“And down I went to fetch my bride:
But, Alice, you were ill at ease;
This dress and that by turns you tried,
Too fearful that you should not please.
I loved you better for your fears,
I knew you could not look but well;
And dews, that would have fall'n in tears,
I kiss'd away before they fell.”
Alfred Tennyson

Dia Reeves
“It's easier to be careful in dresses. You have to be or you end up flashing your underclothes or destroying beautiful fabric. Dresses force you to be on guard.”
Dia Reeves, Bleeding Violet

Shan Sa
“To other women the choice of clothes was a form of ingenious exhibition, a shameless seduction. To me, dresses were like a breastplate that I put on to set off to war against this life.”
Shan Sa, Empress

Philip Reeve
“The Scriven men wore stack-heeled boots and pearl-studded evening coats; the ladies in their vast skirts looked like mythical creatures, half woman, half sofa.”
Philip Reeve, Fever Crumb

أنيس منصور
“كلما قصر الفستان طالت النظرة إليه !”
أنيس منصور, اثنين .. اثنين

V.C. Andrews
“Look at you, standing there in your iron- gray dress, feeling pious
and self- righteous while you starve small children!”
V.C. Andrews, Flowers in the Attic

Oliver Markus
“The red lipstick? It's supposed to signal fertility and readiness to mate. Just like the swollen red butt of a baboon. That tight-fitting little dress that shows off your curves? From the standpoint of evolutionary biology, big breasts represent a healthy mate who can feed a lot of offspring. That's why men are programmed to like big tits. When you show off your curves, what you're really doing is advertising to the whole world: "Look at me! I'm a healthy female! I'd be a perfect mate! Come mount me!”
Oliver Markus, Why Men And Women Can't Be Friends

أنيس منصور
“عندما أجد إمرأة قبيحة ملابسها أنيقة فإنني أرثي لفساتينها”
أنيس منصور, قالوا

أنيس منصور
“المرأة حيوان مخيف : إنظر إليها و هي ترمق فساتين إمرأة أخرى .. إنها حيوان شرس لا إنسانية عندها !”
أنيس منصور, اثنين .. اثنين

Laura Anderson Kurk
“Her problem is with pretty,” Tennyson said. "She thinks I’ll need all these dresses in college. Like I would ever in a billion years pledge a sorority. I’ll pack a few of these to be ironic, though. I can wear them to, like, truck stops at night with mascara running down my cheeks and stuff.”
Laura Anderson Kurk, Perfect Glass

John Steinbeck
“And the women who had thought they wanted dresses never realized that what they had wanted was happiness.”
John Steinbeck, East of Eden

John Green
“Girls think they're only allowed to wear dresses on formal occasions, but I like a woman who says, you know, I'm going over to see a boy who is having a nervous breakdown, a boy whose connection to the sense of sight itself is tenuous, and gosh dang it, I am going to wear a dress for him.”
John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

Laurell K. Hamilton
“Put some make-up on me and I look not unlike a china doll. Put me in a puffy pink dress and I look delicate, dainty, petite. Dammit.”
Laurell K. Hamilton, The Laughing Corpse

Georgette Heyer
“Eugenia never wears modish gowns. She says there are more important things to think of than one's dresses.'
'What a stupid thing to say!' remarked Sophy. 'Naturally there are, but not, I hold, when one is dressing for dinner.”
Georgette Heyer, The Grand Sophy

Irwin Shaw
“When I think of New York City, I think of all the girls, the Jewish girls, the Italian girls, the Irish, Polack, Chinese, German, Negro, Spanish, Russian girls, all on parade in the city. I don't know whether it's something special with me or whether every man in the city walks around with the same feeling inside him, but I feel as though I'm at a picnic in this city. I like to sit near the women in the theaters, the famous beauties who've taken six hours to get ready and look it. And the young girls at the football games, with the red cheeks, and when the warm weather comes, the girls in their summer dresses . . .”
Irwin Shaw, The Girls in Their Summer Dresses

Georgette Heyer
“Eugenia never wears modish gowns. She says there are more important things to think of than one's dresses."
"What a stupid thing to say!" remarked Sophy. "Naturally there are, but not, I hold, when one is dressing for dinner.”
Georgette Heyer, The Grand Sophy

Suzanne Enoch
“Tiny white flowers sprinkled the upper part of the gown like glimpses of stars at dusk, while the gathered waist and skirt darkened into solid twilight.”
Suzanne Enoch, Taming Rafe

Irwin Shaw
“I'm older now, I'm a man getting near middle age, putting on a little fat and I still love to walk along Fifth Avenue at three o'clock on the east side of the street between Fiftieth and Fifty-seventh streets, they're all out then, making believe they're shopping, in their furs and their crazy hats, everything all concentrated from all over the world into eight blocks, the best furs, the best clothes, the handsomest women, out to spend money and feeling good about it, looking coldly at you, making believe they're not looking at you as you go past.”
Irwin Shaw, The Girls in Their Summer Dresses

Patrick Rothfuss
“She wasn't dressed like a student. She wore an elaborate burgundy dress with long skirts, a tight waist, and matching burgundy gloves that rose all the way to her elbows.

Moving deliberately, she managed to get down off the stool without tangling her feet and made her way over to stand nest to my table. Her blond hair was artfully curled, and her lips were a deeply painted red. I couldn't help wondering what she was doing in a place like Anker's.”
Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear

Girdhar Joshi
“Women are women…How can they ignore their bodies, their looks, and above all, their dresses!”
Girdhar Joshi, Some Mistakes Have No Pardon

Enock Maregesi
“Siku ya kwanza dhambi ya kwanza ilipotendwa Mungu alitoa kafara ya kwanza ya wanyama kwa ajili ya wazazi wetu wa kwanza Adamu na Hawa. Adamu na Hawa walikuwa uchi, baada ya kutenda dhambi, Mungu akawalaani lakini akawapa uwezo wa muda mfupi wa kutubu dhambi zao ili awasamehe! Kutokana na ngozi za wanyama hao walipata mavazi na kutokana na damu ya wanyama hao walipata fursa ya kuishi na kutubu dhambi zote walizozitenda. Bila hivyo wasingepata muda wa kusamehewa.”
Enock Maregesi

Sarah Addison Allen
“When Paxton was a teenager, her friends had even envied her relationship with her mother. Everyone knew that neither Paxton nor Sophia scheduled anything on Sunday afternoons, because that was popcorn-and-pedicures time, when mother and daughter sat in the family room and watched sappy movies and tried out beauty products. And Paxton could remember her mother carrying dresses she'd ordered into her bedroom, almost invisible behind tiers of taffeta, as they'd planned for formal dances. She'd loved helping Paxton pick out what to wear. And her mother had exquisite taste. Paxton could still remember dresses her mother wore more than twenty-five years ago. Imprinted in her memory were shiny blue ones, sparkly white ones, wispy rose-colored ones.”
Sarah Addison Allen, The Peach Keeper

“They're sitting on the floor in A Stitch in Time, surrounded on all sides by dresses of every imaginable color. Cora realizes as she glances around, her gaze flitting quickly from one wall to the next, that Etta has arranged them like the seasons: sparkling whites, grays, blacks for winter; shimmering greens and blues for spring; pinks and purples for summer; reds, oranges and yellows for autumn. Together they are breathtaking, almost too bright if stared at for too long, like falling through a rainbow lit by the sun.”
Menna van Praag, The Dress Shop of Dreams

Lisa Kleypas
“The pink?" she suggested, holding the shimmering rose-colored satin in front of Sara's half-clad figure. Sara held her breath in awe. She had never worn such a sumptuous creation. Silk roses adorned the sleeves and hem of the gown. The short-waisted bodice was finished with a stomacher of silver filigree and a row of satin bows.
Lily shook her head thoughtfully. "Charming, but too innocent."
Sara suppressed a disappointed sigh. She couldn't imagine anything more beautiful than the pink satin. Busily Monique discarded the gown and sorted through the others. "The peach. No man will be able to keep his eyes from her in that. Here, let us try it, chérie."
Raising her arms, Sara let the dressmaker and her assistant Cora pull the gauzy peach-hued gown over her head. "I think it will have to be altered a great deal," Sara commented, her voice muffled beneath the delicate layers of fabric. The gowns had been fitted for Lily's lithe, compact lines. Sara was more amply endowed, with a generous bosom and curving hips, and a tiny, scoped-in waist... a figure style that had been fashionable thirty years ago. The current high-waisted Grecian mode was not particularly flattering to her.
Monique settled the gown around Sara's feet and then began to yank the back of it together. "Oui, Lady Raiford has the form that fashion loves." Energetically, she hooked the tight bodice together. "But you, chérie, have the kind that men love. Draw in your breath, s'il vous plaît."
Sara winced as her breasts were pushed upward until they nearly overflowed from the low-cut bodice. The hem of the unusually full skirt was bordered with three rows of graduated tulip-leaves. Sara could hardly believe the woman in the mirror was herself. The peach gown, with its transparent layers of silk and shockingly low neckline, had been designed to attract a man's attention. It was too loose at the waist, but her breasts rose from the shallow bodice in creamy splendor pushed together to form an enticing cleavage.”
Lisa Kleypas, Dreaming of You

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