Dc Comics Quotes

Quotes tagged as "dc-comics" (showing 1-22 of 22)
Neil Gaiman
“I wanted to put a reference to masturbation in one of the scripts for the Sandman. It was immediately cut by the editor [Karen Berger]. She told me, "There's no masturbation in the DC Universe." To which my reaction was, "Well, that explains a lot about the DC Universe.”
Neil Gaiman

Grant Morrison
“Einstein was wrong! I"M the speed of like CRACKING through shivery rainbows and GOD the sky whirls and withers like a melting RAINBOW!”
Grant Morrison, Batman: Arkham Asylum - A Serious House on Serious Earth

Gwenda Bond
“I was many things, but I wasn't a quitter. I didn't give up, and I wasn't going to start.”
Gwenda Bond, Fallout

“Not even girls want to be girls so long as our feminine archetype lacks force, strength, and power. Not wanting to be girls, they don't want to be tender, submissive, peace-loving as good women are. Women's strong qualities have become despised because of their weakness. The obvious remedy is to create a feminine character with all the strength of Superman plus all the allure of a good and beautiful woman.”
William Moulton Marston

Gwenda Bond
“The problem with having friends was that you might lose them. Or they might get hurt.”
Gwenda Bond, Fallout

Gwenda Bond
“My problem was that I had bad luck. And I spoke up when I saw something wrong. I did it because I could, without having to worry about the fallout lasting years. And yes, there was always fallout.”
Gwenda Bond, Fallout

Gwenda Bond
“There probably were things worse than the guy you had a crush on saying that kind of thing about your sister, but not many. Maddy could do way better than teeth-and-hair guy.”
Gwenda Bond, Fallout

“You can't foresee all the consequences of your actions - But that's no excuse to do nothing.”
Hal Jordan

“The multiverse model offers an elegantly postmodern solution to character stasis in a market-driven serial publishing system which privileges constancy over major change.”
José Alaniz, Death, Disability, and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond

“Sympathy once more reveals its limits when faced with madness.”
José Alaniz, Death, Disability, and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond

Stacey Ballis
“There are food stations around the room, each representing one of the main characters. The Black Widow station is all Russian themed, with a carved ice sculpture that delivers vodka into molded ice shot glasses, buckwheat blini with smoked salmon and caviar, borsht bite skewers, minipita sandwiches filled with grilled Russian sausages, onion salad, and a sour cream sauce.
The Captain America station is, naturally, all-American, with cheeseburger sliders, miniwaffles topped with a fried chicken tender and drizzled with Tabasco honey butter, paper cones of French fries, mini-Chicago hot dogs, a mac 'n' cheese bar, and pickled watermelon skewers. The Hulk station is all about duality and green. Green and white tortellini, one filled with cheese, the other with spicy sausage, skewered with artichoke hearts with a brilliant green pesto for dipping. Flatbreads cooked with olive oil and herbs and Parmesan, topped with an arugula salad in a lemon vinaigrette. Mini-espresso cups filled with hot sweet pea soup topped with cold sour cream and chervil.
And the dessert buffet is inspired by Loki, the villain of the piece, and Norse god of mischief. There are plenty of dessert options, many of the usual suspects, mini-creme brûlée, eight different cookies, small tarts. But here and there are mischievous and whimsical touches. Rice Krispies treats sprinkled with Pop Rocks for a shocking dining experience. One-bite brownies that have a molten chocolate center that explodes in the mouth. Rice pudding "sushi" topped with Swedish Fish.”
Stacey Ballis, Out to Lunch

“I bet you were all only children, or felt isolated, or busy “training” and stuff. I bet none of you can lay claim to knowing what a normal teen life is supposed to be! Geez, you’re so judgmental, I wanna puke!”
Cissie King-Jones Peter David

Paul Dini
“There's so much going on here, and out there, and places we don't even know about. Everything's so scary and uncertain. We never know when fate will shake it all up."

"That's pretty deep."

"You gotta wonder how we'll ever make it through."

"I guess we can fall back on what's gotten us this far."

"A positive attitude and lots of denial?”
Paul Dini, Countdown to Final Crisis, Vol. 4

Stewart Stafford
“A superhero is just an ordinary person who has found a better way to mask their human frailties.”
Stewart Stafford

“With emancipation comes the opening up of new possibilities for challenging assumptions over women's appearance and, more radically, the gender order itself. Ventura (She-Thing) comes not only to accept her new "intragender" status but to see it as advantageous -- for dealing with her misandry, for personal growth, and even for becoming a person capable of giving and accepting love.”
José Alaniz, Death, Disability, and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond

“Disability fluctuates, growing visible, then invisible, then visible again, becoming both ever-present and haunting. Such a problematizing of physical life added a new wrinkle to the genre's double/secret identity trope: the characters now interact with their shifting bodies as bodies with all the complications involved.”
José Alaniz, Death, Disability, and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond

“[In "The Night Gwen Stacy Died"], death took on an existential quality -- the beloved, innocent but weak Gwen is merely a victim, the casualty of a war between superpowered rivals -- and as such the episode proved a turning point int eh genre's depiction of mortality.”
José Alaniz, Death, Disability, and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond

“We should bear in mind the supercrip stereotype as a figure obsessively, indeed maniacally, over-compensating for a perceived physical difference or lack, since, as we shall see, this aspect ties in quite neatly with the genre specificities and narratival concerns of so much Silver Age superhero literature.”
José Alaniz, Death, Disability, and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond

“If someone's personhood is in doubt (or seen as lacking), all the easier to direct death wishes at them. When a tiny minority of them transgresses, their crimes of violence only confirm their abjection from the human [. . .] Anxiety, threat, dread, fear, and prejudice feed into the explanatory mechanisms that construct them as somehow beyond human, beyond mercy.”
José Alaniz, Death, Disability, and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond

Gwenda Bond
“The thrill of working in this building, with its iconic globe on top, would never fade.”
Gwenda Bond, Triple Threat

“Behold man's final mad disgrace. He chops his nose to spite his face”
Etrigan, the demon

“The stereotype of the supercrip, in the eyes of its critics, represents a sort of overachieving, overdetermined self-enfreakment that distracts from the lived daily reality of most disabled people.”
José Alaniz, Death, Disability, and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond