Bertie Quotes

Quotes tagged as "bertie" Showing 1-13 of 13
Lisa Mantchev
“What color is pandemonium? It sounds yellow.”
Lisa Mantchev, Eyes Like Stars

Lisa Mantchev
“The only reason I'm friends with any of you is because I outgrew the von Trapps, one annoying Austrian at a time.”
Lisa Mantchev, Eyes Like Stars

Lisa Mantchev
“One o' these days, lass, I'm goin' t' still that mouth o' yers. - Nate”
Lisa Mantchev, Eyes Like Stars

Lisa Mantchev
“I may hold ye at arm's length....But I want ye t' be mine an' mine alone. - Nate to Bertie, as they danced.”
Lisa Mantchev, Eyes Like Stars

Lisa Mantchev
“He pulled her close. “Someday, I will win your trust, and you will be the one to set me free. I know it.”
“I won’t.” Bertie recoiled from both him and the assertion she would do such a thing. “Not ever.”
Ariel made no move to touch her again, though his words were a caress. “Don’t make promises you won’t be able to keep.”
Lisa Mantchev, Eyes Like Stars

Lisa Mantchev
“The collar had restrained his winds but not killed them. They uncoiled from behind the shadows, ready to surround her, to lift her up, to carry her away with only Ariel’s silk-clad arms wrapped about her to keep her from falling.

Spirare, they whispered to her like an incantation. Breathe us in.

Bertie didn’t mean to, but she inhaled, and everything inside her was a spring morning, a rose opening its petals to the sun, the light coming through the wavering glass of an old, diamond-paned window.

Tendrils of wind reached for Bertie with a coaxing hand. Release him, and he will love you.
Lisa Mantchev, Eyes Like Stars

Lisa Mantchev
“Mustardseed grinned at Bertie. "I was never any good at geometry, but you’re stuck in a love triangle, aren’t you?"

"Shut up," she ordered even as Moth asked, "But what if there were four of them?"

"That’s a love rectangle, and five people would be a love pentagon."

"And what are six people in love?" Cobweb demanded.

Mustardseed thought it over a moment. "Manslaughter, I suppose.”
Lisa Mantchev , So Silver Bright

Lisa Mantchev
“This is a theater," Bertie, annoyed by the inquisition, dropped him onto stage. Several feet of slack cable landed atop the fairy in a slithering heap.
"Oh!" Peaseblossom said. "You've buried him alive!”
Lisa Mantchev, Eyes Like Stars

P.G. Wodehouse
“When it comes to letting the world in on the secrets of his heart, he has about as much shrinking reticence as a steam calliope.”
P. G. Wodehouse

Lisa Mantchev
“You must be mistaking me for someone else with silver hair.”
Lisa Mantchev, So Silver Bright

Alexander McCall Smith
“Irene gasped. "Have you taken leave of your senses, Stuart?" she hissed. "Have you?"
Stuart closed his eyes.
"No," he said. "Au contraire." It was strong language for the Edinburgh New Town, but he had to say it.
"Don't au contraire me," said Irene.
But it was too late. He had.”
Alexander McCall Smith, Sunshine on Scotland Street

Bertrand Russell
“It will be seen that there are various stages in the removal from acquaintance with particulars: there is Bismarck to people who knew him; Bismarck to those who only know of him through history; the man with the iron mask; the longest-lived of men. These are progressively further removed from acquaintance with particulars; the first comes as near to acquaintance as is possible in regard to another person; in the second, we shall still be said to know 'who Bismarck was'; in the third, we do not know who was the man with the iron mask, though we can know many propositions about him which are not logically deducible from the fact that he wore an iron mask; in the fourth, finally, we know nothing beyond what is logically deducible from the definition of the man. There is a similar hierarchy in the region of universals. Many universals, like many particulars, are only known to us by description. But here, as in the case of particulars, knowledge concerning what is known by description is ultimately reducible to knowledge concerning what is known by acquaintance.
The fundamental principle in the analysis of propositions containing descriptions is this: Every proposition which we can understand must be composed wholly of constituents with which we are acquainted.”
Bertrand Russell
tags: bertie

“When we examine common words, we find that, broadly speaking, proper names stand for particulars, while other substantives, adjectives, prepositions, and verbs stand for universals. Pronouns stand for particulars, but are ambiguous: it is only by the context or the circumstances that we know the pronoun's meaning. Every sentence must contain at least one universal.”
Bertrand Russell,