Baseball Quotes Quotes

Quotes tagged as "baseball-quotes" (showing 1-26 of 26)
Yogi Berra
“Ninety percent of this game is half mental.”
Yogi Berra

Tucker Elliot
“Sometimes are feats aren’t so fabulous, they’re just dubious—but either way, they’re fun to talk about.”
Tucker Elliot

Tucker Elliot
“I don’t know how long we talked about that game the first time my dad showed me the ticket stub. He admitted he hadn’t even been sure that he still had it, that he was surprised when he’d been able to find it. But we’ve spent hours and hours and hours talking about it since. And it’s pretty amazing, because that ticket stub sat in a box for two decades—once it let my dad into a stadium to see a baseball game, and then later, it let me into my dad’s world, into his past, to learn about the man who taught me to love a game so passionately that it shaped nearly every aspect of my life.”
Tucker Elliot

Tucker Elliot
“Baseball is known for superstitious players and cursed teams—and at the root of every curse there’s a story. Boston’s curse was to trade Babe Ruth to the Yankees. Cubs fans claim a billy goat is responsible for their futility. And Cleveland’s curse? The club struggled after its Pennant-winning 1954 season, but it was rich with optimism just two years later as an onslaught of new talent promised to lift the club once more to the ranks of baseball’s elite—and by 1959 the club was contending for the Pennant again. And then GM Frank Lane traded Rocky Colavito to the Detroit Tigers and cursed everything.”
Tucker Elliot

Tucker Elliot
“Free agency changed the baseball landscape in many ways. It created more opportunities for players, but it also meant increasingly fewer players would spend an entire career playing for one franchise—and that’s especially true for players capable of becoming “legends,” the ones in such demand on the free agent market.”
Tucker Elliot

Tucker Elliot
“Joe DiMaggio batted safely in 56 consecutive games in 1941, the same season Ted Williams batted .406—but did you know that also in 1941, Jeff Heath, an outfielder who spent a decade playing for the Indians, became the first player in AL history to hit 20 doubles, 20 triples, and 20 home runs in the same season? It’s true.”
Tucker Elliot

Tucker Elliot
“Joe Sewell is the toughest strikeout in baseball history. In 14 seasons he struck out only 114 times—he never struck out three times in a game, and he struck out twice in a game on only two occasions. So how is it possible that a 30-year-old pitcher who won eight games and recorded 54 strikeouts—in his career—fanned Sewell twice in one game? I don’t know, but he did, in 1923.”
Tucker Elliot

Tucker Elliot
“The best word to describe Albert Belle during the mid-1990s is “prolific.” The man could flat hit.”
Tucker Elliot

Tucker Elliot
“Most of us would give anything for the chance to play just one day of MLB baseball—especially for our favorite team. Well, there once was a pitcher named Bock Baker who actually got two opportunities to pitch in the big leagues. He took the mound for Cleveland against the Chicago White Sox in his big league debut. How did he fare? Well, he pitched a complete game. Pretty spectacular, right? Well, sure—but it depends on your perspective. He gave up 23 hits and 13 runs. Baker never pitched for Cleveland again, but the Philadelphia Athletics gave him a second big league start that same year (1901). He lasted juts six innings, and lost again after giving up 11 runs—and then his career was over.”
Tucker Elliot

Tucker Elliot
“Only 12 managers have lasted more than three years with the Indians, and only three of those who did last longer than three years managed to do so without a winning record. The Indians have made strides in many areas the last three years and the shifts and changes amongst the coaching staff resulted in a highly respected group that was anxious and ready to guide the Tribe back to the postseason, but unfortunately it never materialized. Turns out the three-year threshold is a pretty solid limit for how patient an organization is when it comes to managers, and the gains made in 2011 were completely lost and then some in 2012. Acta’s tenure with the club came to an end with six games left on the 2012 schedule. He ranks 13th in franchise history for games managed, but any optimisim regarding the Tribe in 2013 will rest squarely with new hire Terry Francona.”
Tucker Elliot

Tucker Elliot
“The Indians franchise is more than a century old. It’s been called the Blues, the Bronchos, and the Naps. It’s also been called a lot worse during hard times when the team wasn’t winning.”
Tucker Elliot

Tucker Elliot
“General manager Frank Lane made his mark on the club by making several unpopular or unsuccessful trades. Among the guys he traded to other teams are Rocky Colavito, Roger Maris, Norm Cash, and … manager Joe Gordon? Uh, yes. Lane and Detroit GM Bill DeWitt traded managers—Joe Gordon for Jimmy Dykes. Lane’s tenure ended shortly thereafter, long before the damage he caused.”
Tucker Elliot

“Branch Rickey once said of me that I was a man with an infinite capacity for immediately making a bad thing worse.”
Leo Durocher, Nice Guys Finish Last

Tucker Elliot
“Vic Wertz once hit a ball rather famously that was later described as such: 'It would have been a home run in any other park—including Yellowstone.' Instead, he’s remembered as the guy who got robbed by Willie Mays' spectacular catch during the 1954 World Series between the Indians and the Giants, a play that remains one of the game’s all-time greatest defensive efforts. What people often forget about Wertz is that his greatest battle wasn’t that one at bat, and that one out never defined his career. He was stricken with polio in 1955, and after 74 games his season was over and his career was hanging in the balance. 'The Catch' by Willie Mays couldn’t keep him down, and neither could polio—he came back in 1956, and despite playing in only 136 games he belted 32 home runs with 106 RBIs.”
Tucker Elliot

Mallika Nawal
“The questions came...hurling at him...like the balls from a baseball pitching machine...just one after the other without a care or concern of where they went - but he couldn't hit them, he didn't have a baseball bat - he only had a toothpick!”
Mallika Nawal, I'm a Woman & I'm on SALE

Bernard Malamud
“At thirty-three the Whammer still enjoyed exceptional eyesight. He saw the ball spin off Roy's fingertips and it reminded him of a white pigeon he had kept as a boy, that he would send into flight by flipping it into the air. The ball flew at him and he was conscious of its bird-form and white flapping wings, until it suddenly disappeared from view. He heard a noise like the bang of a firecracker at his feet and Sam had the ball in his mitt. Unable to believe his ears he heard Mercy intone a reluctant strike.”
Bernard Malamud

Tom Swyers
“Real ballplayers pass the stuffing by rolling it up in a ball and batting it across the table with a turkey leg.”
Tom Swyers

Stephen King
“Baseball is also a game of balance.”
Stephen King, Blockade Billy

“It ain't braggin if you can back it up...”
Dizzy Dean, How It Feels To Be a Has-Been: And Other Essays from Baseball Greats in Their Own Words

Tom Swyers
“Four out of five doctors prescribe baseball for whatever ails you. The fifth guy is a quack.”
Tom Swyers

“God takes care of drunks and third basemen”
Leo Durocher

Dirk Lammers
“A no-hitter secures a pitcher’s spot on an elite yet diverse list that embraces Hall of Famers, struggling journeymen, and wide-eyed rookies.”
Dirk Lammers, Baseball's No-Hit Wonders: More Than a Century of Pitching's Greatest Feats

Michael   Lewis
“Analyzing baseball yields many numbers of interest and value. Yet far and away- far, far and away- the most critical number in all of baseball is 3: the three outs that define an inning. Until the third out, anything is possible; after it, nothing is. [Eric Walker]”
Michael Lewis

“The only change is that baseball has turned Paige from a second class citizen to a second class immortal.”
Leroy Satchel Paige

David James Duncan
“Baseball is not life. It is a fiction, a metaphor. And a ballplayer is a man who agrees to uphold that metaphor as though lives were at stake.”
David James Duncan, The Brothers K

“I call 'em as I see 'em”
baseball umps