James Shapiro


Born
in Brooklyn, New York, The United States
September 11, 1955

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James S. Shapiro is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University who specialises in Shakespeare and the Early Modern period. Shapiro has served on the faculty at Columbia University since 1985, teaching Shakespeare and other topics, and he has published widely on Shakespeare and Elizabethan culture.

Average rating: 4.05 · 5,439 ratings · 852 reviews · 18 distinct worksSimilar authors
A Year in the Life of Willi...

4.09 avg rating — 2,655 ratings — published 2005 — 26 editions
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Contested Will: Who Wrote S...

3.98 avg rating — 1,259 ratings — published 2010 — 18 editions
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The Year of Lear: Shakespea...

4.06 avg rating — 1,318 ratings — published 2015 — 10 editions
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Shakespeare and the Jews

4.09 avg rating — 58 ratings — published 1995 — 5 editions
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Oberammergau: The Troubling...

3.56 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 2000 — 7 editions
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Shakespeare in America: An ...

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4.03 avg rating — 40 ratings — published 2014 — 4 editions
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Rival Playwrights: Marlowe,...

3.17 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1990
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Shakespeare: una vida y una...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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A Day at the Beach

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Sunrise Over Belet

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings2 editions
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“We've inherited many ideas about writing that emerged in the eighteenth century, especially an interest in literature as both an expression and an exploration of the self. This development — part of what distinguishes the "modern" from the "early modern" — has shaped the work of many of our most celebrated authors, whose personal experiences indelibly and visibly mark their writing. It's fair to say that the fiction and poetry of many of the finest writers of the past century or so — and I'm thinking here of Conrad, Proust, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Kafka, Plath, Ellison, Lowell, Sexton, Roth, and Coetzee, to name but a few — have been deeply autobiographical. The link between the life and the work is one of the things we're curious about and look for when we pick up the latest book by a favorite author.”
James Shapiro, Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare?

“It may take a decade or two before the extent of Shakespeare's collaboration passes from the graduate seminar to the undergraduate lecture, and finally to popular biography, by which time it will be one of those things about Shakespeare that we thought we knew all along. Right now, though, for those who teach the plays and write about his life, it hasn't been easy abandoning old habits of mind. I know that I am not alone in struggling to come to terms with how profoundly it alters one's sense of how Shakespeare wrote, especially toward the end of his career when he coauthored half of his last ten plays. For intermixed with five that he wrote alone, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, The Winter's Tale, Cymbeline, and The Tempest, are Timon of Athens (written with Thomas Middleton), Pericles (written with George Wilkins), and Henry the Eighth, the lost Cardenio, and The Two Noble Kinsmen (all written with John Fletcher).”
James Shapiro, Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare?

“By wrenching this increasingly outdated revenge play into the present, Shakespeare forced his contemporaries to experience what he felt and what his play registers so profoundly: the world had changed. Old certainties were gone, even if new ones had not yet taken hold. The most convincing way of showing this was to ask playgoers to keep both plays in mind at once, to experience a new Hamlet while memories of the old one, ghostlike, still lingered. Audiences at the Globe soon found themselves, like Hamlet, straddling worlds and struggling to reconcile past and present.”
James Shapiro, A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare

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