Readers And Writers Quotes

Quotes tagged as "readers-and-writers" (showing 1-30 of 81)
John Cheever
“I can’t write without a reader. It’s precisely like a kiss—you can’t do it alone.”
John Cheever

Alberto Manguel
“Maybe this is why we read, and why in moments of darkness we return to books: to find words for what we already know.”
Alberto Manguel, A Reading Diary: A Passionate Reader's Reflections on a Year of Books

Bernard Cornwell
“Don't tell me the moon is shining, show me the glint of light on broken glass.”
Bernard Cornwell

Vladimir Nabokov
“Readers are not sheep, and not every pen tempts them.”
Vladimir Nabokov, Lectures on Literature

Brian Andreas
“Secret Notes:
He wrote secret notes to people he hadn't met yet. Some of them aren't even born, he said, but we live in a strange neighborhood & they will need help figuring things out & I won't always be around to explain it to them.”
Brian Andreas

Tina  Smith
“I am so happy that I made someone cry today - don't worry I'm a writer. It's when they make me cry that it's a problem.”
Tina Smith

Aberjhani
“When a reader enters the pages of a book of poetry, he or she enters a world where dreams transform the past into knowledge made applicable to the present, and where visions shape the present into extraordinary possibilities for the future.”
Aberjhani, Collected Visions of a Skylark Dressed in Black

“Statistically, if you're reading this sentence, you're an oddball. The average American spends three minutes a day reading a book. At this moment, you and I are engaged in an essentially antiquated interaction. Welcome, fellow Neanderthal!”
Dick Meyer, Why We Hate Us: American Discontent in the New Millennium

Annie Dillard
“Why are we reading, if not in hope of beauty laid bare, life heightened and its deepest mystery probed? Can the writer isolate and vivify all in experience that most deeply engages our intellects and our heats? Can the writer renew our hope for literary forms? Why are we reading if not in hope that the writer will magnify and dramatize our days, will illuminate and inspire us with wisdom, courage, and the possibility of meaningfulness, and will press upon our minds the deepest mysteries, so we may feel again their majesty and power?”
Annie Dillard, The Writing Life

Kage Baker
“I want you to tell all these people that I wanted more time to spend with them. Tell them I meant to, tell them I wanted to hear what they said and tell them what was on my mind.”
Kage Baker

Harold Bloom
“I think the Greek New Testament is the strongest and most successful misreading of a great prior text in the entire history of influence.”
Harold Bloom

Christopher B. Krebs
“Tacitus did not write a most dangerous book. His readers made it so.”
Christopher B. Krebs

Annie Dillard
“So it is that a writer writes many books. In each book, he intended several urgent and vivid points, many of which he sacrificed as the book's form hardened.”
Annie Dillard, The Writing Life

Patricia Duncker
“The cats are asleep at the end of my bed and all around me, the thundery silence of L'Escarènere, caught at last in the rising flood of warm air, carrying the sand from the south. The Alps are folded above in the flickering light. And on the desk in the room beneath lies the writing which insists that the only escape is through the absolute destruction of everything you have ever known, loved, cared for, believed in, even the shell of yourself must be discarded with contempt; for freedom costs no less than everything, including your generosity, self-respect, integrity, tenderness - is that really what i wanted to say? It's what I have said. Worse still, I have pointed out the sheer creative joy of this ferocious destructiveness and the liberating wonder of violence. And these are dangerous messages for which I am no longer responsible.”
Patricia Duncker

“We've inherited many ideas about writing that emerged in the eighteenth century, especially an interest in literature as both an expression and an exploration of the self. This development — part of what distinguishes the "modern" from the "early modern" — has shaped the work of many of our most celebrated authors, whose personal experiences indelibly and visibly mark their writing. It's fair to say that the fiction and poetry of many of the finest writers of the past century or so — and I'm thinking here of Conrad, Proust, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Kafka, Plath, Ellison, Lowell, Sexton, Roth, and Coetzee, to name but a few — have been deeply autobiographical. The link between the life and the work is one of the things we're curious about and look for when we pick up the latest book by a favorite author.”
James Shapiro, Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare?

Laura Anne Gilman
“I'm not so arrogant to think I'm the only guide someone needs ... but I might be the guide that someone needs.”
Laura Anne Gilman

C.D. Wright
“Readers have to be sought out and won to the light of the page, poem by poem, one by one by one.”
C.D. Wright

M.R. James
“Those who spend the greater part of their time in reading or writing books are, of course, apt to take rather particular notice of accumulations of books when they come across them. They will not pass a stall, a shop, or even a bedroom-shelf without reading some title, and if they find themselves in an unfamiliar library, no host need trouble himself further about their entertainment.”
M.R. James

John Fowles
“A word (...) is never the destination, merely a signpost in its general direction; and whatever (...) body that destination finally acquires owes quite as much to the reader as to the writer.”
John Fowles

Pamela Paul
“Books gnaw at me from around the edges of my life, demanding more time and attention. I am always left hungry.”
Pamela Paul, My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues

“Authors do not need to offer us the answers to such weighty questions such as how to live and prepare us to accept death. The aim of a writer’s is to frame worldly questions that allow all readers too independently and jointly explore life-altering questions in a way that satisfies the fabric of thought corresponding to our respective times.”
Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls

Ana Claudia Antunes
“? Reviews are for readers AND authors. It’s a good way of learning from what people think about the work. Being it good or bad. A book might as well be hurt by a bad, poorly written review. That’s such a pity. Some people don’t know how to express themselves, and maybe that’s why they are just readers and not writers, others read a book like chewing a cupcake. That’s too bad. If that was not your cup of tea, leave it there, untouched. Don’t go bash the author for that. But if you really hate the book, why bother telling others. It’s your problem after all. You can give constructive opinions but don’t blame the author for your different tastes and views. Also authors shouldn’t comment on reviews, it sounds unprofessional, even silly. Some busy writers don’t even have time to read what other people say about their work. If someone enjoyed your book, or not, that is irrelevant. If you will continue or not to write something else it doesn´t add to the plate.. Besides, why bother commenting on a review, just read it and shut up. Being it good or bad. So my opinions about authors commenting on reviews is just my opinions after all!”
Ana Claudia Antunes

Margareth Stewart
“She never claimed to be a writer, she simply described herself as a typist of stories waiting to come alive.”
Margareth Stewart, Open/Pierre´s journey after war

D.W. Plato
“Give me thirty minutes in a hostel, hotel or hospital and I can walk out with a novel idea.”
D.W. Plato

“Reading, writing, and personal introspection will not protect us from hardship and suffering, but they might introduce us to critical thinking and expose us to what is good in humankind and beautiful in the world that we share with all of nature. Contemplative thought, especially that supplemented with reading literature and attempting to write our own replies to the echoing voices of writers whom preceded us provide us with the potentiality for change, the possibility of personal illumination that enables us to experience a heighted quality of life.”
Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls

Munia Khan
“Word-Power'

Being stuck in my room,
I've become a world traveler.
If you wonder how...
just guess how I've reached you right now”
Munia Khan

Pamela Paul
“All of us are writers reading other people's writing, turning pages or clicking to the next screen with pleasure and admiration. All of us absorb other people's words, feeling like we have gotten to know the authors personally in our own ways, even if just a tiny bit. True, we may also harbor jealousy or resentment, disbelief or disappointment. We may wish we had written those words ourselves or berate ourselves for knowing we never could or sigh with relief that we didn't, but thank goodness someone else has.”
Pamela Paul, By the Book: Writers on Literature and the Literary Life from The New York Times Book Review

Eskay Teel
“The last chapter in 'Alice in Worcestershire' is called 'Writing the book'.
I started to write that 'Diary' chapter at the very beginning of the process and followed it through to the end... speaking to the reader.

My decision to do this was because I've often read autobiographies and wondered how the author felt and how it impacted them writing about painful memories that had been locked away in a deep forgotten place.
I wanted to know what was going in their 'present' life while they were writing; about the struggle with sharing their inner secrets and... I'm... inquisitive. (nosy)!

It took me over five years to finish 'Alice in Worcestershire' because sometimes, I was simply too drained to continue. Periodically, I updated the 'Diary' chapter and, thankfully, it's enthusiastically appreciated by readers.”
Eskay Teel, Alice in Worcestershire: Brummie girls do cry

Noelia Amarillo
“En el universo de la imaginación
nada es imposible.”
Noelia Amarillo, La magia del deseo

Carl McKever
“Readers make writers and writers make readers”
Carl McKever, Poetic Puberty: Developmental Stages of a Poet

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