Erika Krouse

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Erika Krouse

Goodreads Author


Born
The United States
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Influences

Member Since
March 2012

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Erika Krouse is the author of two books of fiction. Her novel, Contenders (Rare Bird Books), was a finalist for the VCU Cabell First Novelist Award, and appears in German with Aufbau-Verlag. Her short story collection, Come Up and See Me Sometime (Scribner), won the Paterson Fiction Award, was a New York Times Notable Book of the year, and is translated into six languages.

Erika’s fiction has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Esquire.com, Ploughshares, One Story, The Kenyon Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, The Iowa Review, Glimmer Train, Story, Boulevard, Crazyhorse, and Shenandoah. Her short stories have been shortlisted for Best American Short Stories and the Pushcart Prize. Erika has also published poetry and essays in magazines such as Granta.com, and reviewed fo
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Average rating: 3.85 · 269 ratings · 40 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
Contenders

4.01 avg rating — 125 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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Come Up and See Me Sometime...

3.80 avg rating — 132 ratings — published 2001 — 10 editions
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Fight Girl: Roman

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Meine Freundin Mae West

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Itsuka Watashi Ni Ainikite

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A Galaxy Not So Far Away: W...

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3.28 avg rating — 75 ratings — published 2002 — 4 editions
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Where Love Is Found: 24 Tal...

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2.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2006 — 6 editions
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Boulevard Nos. 95 & 96

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Erika Krouse is now friends with Hillary Leftwich
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The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai
The Great Believers
by Rebecca Makkai (Goodreads Author)
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Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
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Middle Passage by Charles R. Johnson
Middle Passage
by Charles R. Johnson (Goodreads Author)
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Bend Sinister by Vladimir Nabokov
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Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World by Haruki Murakami
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Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami
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Moby-Dick, or, the Whale by Herman Melville
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The Daylight Marriage by Heidi Pitlor
The Daylight Marriage
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The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro
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More of Erika's books…
“When I asked my shrink if I was a control freak, he finished saying “Absolutely” before I finished saying “freak.” I told him that I once worked with a woman who carried a remote control in her purse. Whenever she got worried or angry, she took it out and stroked it like a gerbil. My shrink said that if I keep comparing myself to severe neurotics, I’ll think that anything is permissible.”
Erika Krouse
tags: humor

“First of all, love is a joint experience between two persons — but the fact that it is a joint experience does not mean that it is a similar experience to the two people involved. There are the lover and the beloved, but these two come from different countries. Often the beloved is only a stimulus for all the stored-up love which had lain quiet within the lover for a long time hitherto. And somehow every lover knows this. He feels in his soul that his love is a solitary thing. He comes to know a new, strange loneliness and it is this knowledge which makes him suffer. So there is only one thing for the lover to do. He must house his love within himself as best he can; he must create for himself a whole new inward world — a world intense and strange, complete in himself. Let it be added here that this lover about whom we speak need not necessarily be a young man saving for a wedding ring — this lover can be man, woman, child, or indeed any human creature on this earth.

Now, the beloved can also be of any description. The most outlandish people can be the stimulus for love. A man may be a doddering great-grandfather and still love only a strange girl he saw in the streets of Cheehaw one afternoon two decades past. The preacher may love a fallen woman. The beloved may be treacherous, greasy-headed, and given to evil habits. Yes, and the lover may see this as clearly as anyone else — but that does not affect the evolution of his love one whit. A most mediocre person can be the object of a love which is wild, extravagant, and beautiful as the poison lilies of the swamp. A good man may be the stimulus for a love both violent and debased, or a jabbering madman may bring about in the soul of someone a tender and simple idyll. Therefore, the value and quality of any love is determined solely by the lover himself.

It is for this reason that most of us would rather love than be loved. Almost everyone wants to be the lover. And the curt truth is that, in a deep secret way, the state of being beloved is intolerable to many. The beloved fears and hates the lover, and with the best of reasons. For the lover is forever trying to strip bare his beloved. The lover craves any possible relation with the beloved, even if this experience can cause him only pain.”
carson mccullers, The Ballad of the Sad Café and Other Stories

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