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Harry Potter and ...
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Still Life
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Drums of Autumn
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by Diana Gabaldon (Goodreads Author)
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Jul 06, 2017 07:24AM

 
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Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
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Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng
Everything I Never Told You
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The Butterfly Effect by Jon Ronson
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An Accidental Death by Peter   Grainger
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Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
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Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling
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Still Life by Louise Penny
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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling
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Bill Bryson
“Perhaps the most irrational fashion act of all was the male habit for 150 years of wearing wigs. Samuel Pepys, as with so many things, was in the vanguard, noting with some apprehension the purchase of a wig in 1663 when wigs were not yet common. It was such a novelty that he feared people would laugh at him in church; he was greatly relieved, and a little proud, to find that they did not. He also worried, not unreasonably, that the hair of wigs might come from plague victims. Perhaps nothing says more about the power of fashion than that Pepys continued wearing wigs even while wondering if they might kill him.”
Bill Bryson, At Home: A Short History of Private Life

Bill Bryson
“America's industrial success produced a roll call of financial magnificence: Rockefellers, Morgans, Astors, Mellons, Fricks, Carnegies, Goulds, du Ponts, Belmonts, Harrimans, Huntingtons, Vanderbilts, and many more based in dynastic wealth of essentially inexhaustible proportions. John D. Rockefeller made $1 billion a year, measured in today's money, and paid no income tax. No one did, for income tax did not yet exist in America. Congress tried to introduce an income tax of 2 percent on earnings of $4,000 in 1894, but the Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional. Income tax wouldn't become a regular part of American Life until 1914. People would never be this rich again.
Spending all this wealth became for many a more or less full-time occupation. A kind of desperate, vulgar edge became attached to almost everything they did. At one New York dinner party, guests found the table heaped with sand and at each place a little gold spade; upon a signal, they were invited to dig in and search for diamonds and other costly glitter buried within. At another party - possibly the most preposterous ever staged - several dozen horses with padded hooves were led into the ballroom of Sherry's, a vast and esteemed eating establishment, and tethered around the tables so that the guests, dressed as cowboys and cowgirls, could enjoy the novel and sublimely pointless pleasure of dining in a New York ballroom on horseback.”
Bill Bryson, At Home: A Short History of Private Life

Margaret Atwood
“When you are in the middle of a story it isn't a story at all, but only a confusion; a dark roaring, a blindness, a wreckage of shattered glass and splintered wood; like a house in a whirlwind, or else a boat crushed by the icebergs or swept over the rapids, and all aboard powerless to stop it. It's only afterwards that it becomes anything like a story at all. When you are telling it, to yourself or to someone else.”
Margaret Atwood, Alias Grace

Jeffrey Eugenides
“Emotions, in my experience, aren't covered by single words. I don't believe in "sadness," "joy," or "regret." Maybe the best proof that the language is patriarchal is that it oversimplifies feeling. I'd like to have at my disposal complicated hybrid emotions, Germanic train-car constructions like, say, "the happiness that attends disaster." Or: "the disappointment of sleeping with one's fantasy." I'd like to show how "intimations of mortality brought on by aging family members" connects with "the hatred of mirrors that begins in middle age." I'd like to have a word for "the sadness inspired by failing restaurants" as well as for "the excitement of getting a room with a minibar." I've never had the right words to describe my life, and now that I've entered my story, I need them more than ever. ”
Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex

Jeffrey Eugenides
“So do boys and men announce their intentions. They cover you like a sarcophagus lid. And call it love.”
Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex

1475 Ravelry Knitters — 2151 members — last activity Jul 08, 2017 02:37PM
For those out there who are addicted to reading, knitting and Ravelry!
179584 Our Shared Shelf — 204772 members — last activity 2 hours, 49 min ago
Dear Readers, As part of my work with UN Women, I have started reading as many books and essays about equality as I can get my hands on. There is so m ...more
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