Fraser

Add friend
Sign in to Goodreads to learn more about Fraser.

https://www.goodreads.com/frasermac

The Weight of Glory
Fraser is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
A Concise Guide t...
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
Shantaram
Fraser is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
See all 4 books that Fraser is reading…

Fraser’s Recent Updates

Fraser wants to read
Making Comics by Lynda Barry
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fraser wants to read
Buy Then Build by Walker Deibel
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fraser finished reading
Blood Song by Anthony Ryan
Blood Song (Raven's Shadow, #1)
by Anthony Ryan (Goodreads Author)
Read 2 times
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fraser rated a book liked it
Blood Song by Anthony Ryan
Blood Song (Raven's Shadow, #1)
by Anthony Ryan (Goodreads Author)
Read 2 times
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fraser wants to read
Under the Banner of Heaven by Jon Krakauer
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fraser wants to read
The Looming Tower by Lawrence Wright
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fraser is currently reading
Blood Song by Anthony Ryan
Blood Song (Raven's Shadow, #1)
by Anthony Ryan (Goodreads Author)
Reading for the 2nd time
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fraser rated a book it was amazing
The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fraser wants to read
Venture Deals by Brad Feld
Venture Deals
by Brad Feld (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Fraser is currently reading
The Weight of Glory by C.S. Lewis
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Fraser's books…
Douglas Adams
“In astrology the rules happen to be about stars and planets, but they could be about ducks and drakes for all the difference it would make. It's just a way of thinking about a problem which lets the shape of that problem begin to emerge. The more rules, the tinier the rules, the more arbitrary they are, the better. It's like throwing a handful of fine graphite dust on a piece of paper to see where the hidden indentations are. It lets you see the words that were written on the piece of paper above it that's now been taken away and hidden. The graphite's not important. It's just the means of revealing the indentations. So you see, astrology's nothing to do with astronomy. It's just to do with people thinking about people.”
Douglas Adams, Mostly Harmless

Terry Pratchett
“O: You’re quite a writer. You’ve a gift for language, you’re a deft hand at plotting, and your books seem to have an enormous amount of attention to detail put into them. You’re so good you could write anything. Why write fantasy?

Pratchett: I had a decent lunch, and I’m feeling quite amiable. That’s why you’re still alive. I think you’d have to explain to me why you’ve asked that question.

O: It’s a rather ghettoized genre.

P: This is true. I cannot speak for the US, where I merely sort of sell okay. But in the UK I think every book— I think I’ve done twenty in the series— since the fourth book, every one has been one the top ten national bestsellers, either as hardcover or paperback, and quite often as both. Twelve or thirteen have been number one. I’ve done six juveniles, all of those have nevertheless crossed over to the adult bestseller list. On one occasion I had the adult best seller, the paperback best-seller in a different title, and a third book on the juvenile bestseller list. Now tell me again that this is a ghettoized genre.

O: It’s certainly regarded as less than serious fiction.

P: (Sighs) Without a shadow of a doubt, the first fiction ever recounted was fantasy. Guys sitting around the campfire— Was it you who wrote the review? I thought I recognized it— Guys sitting around the campfire telling each other stories about the gods who made lightning, and stuff like that. They did not tell one another literary stories. They did not complain about difficulties of male menopause while being a junior lecturer on some midwestern college campus. Fantasy is without a shadow of a doubt the ur-literature, the spring from which all other literature has flown. Up to a few hundred years ago no one would have disagreed with this, because most stories were, in some sense, fantasy. Back in the middle ages, people wouldn’t have thought twice about bringing in Death as a character who would have a role to play in the story. Echoes of this can be seen in Pilgrim’s Progress, for example, which hark back to a much earlier type of storytelling. The epic of Gilgamesh is one of the earliest works of literature, and by the standard we would apply now— a big muscular guys with swords and certain godlike connections— That’s fantasy. The national literature of Finland, the Kalevala. Beowulf in England. I cannot pronounce Bahaghvad-Gita but the Indian one, you know what I mean. The national literature, the one that underpins everything else, is by the standards that we apply now, a work of fantasy.

Now I don’t know what you’d consider the national literature of America, but if the words Moby Dick are inching their way towards this conversation, whatever else it was, it was also a work of fantasy. Fantasy is kind of a plasma in which other things can be carried. I don’t think this is a ghetto. This is, fantasy is, almost a sea in which other genres swim. Now it may be that there has developed in the last couple of hundred years a subset of fantasy which merely uses a different icongraphy, and that is, if you like, the serious literature, the Booker Prize contender. Fantasy can be serious literature. Fantasy has often been serious literature. You have to fairly dense to think that Gulliver’s Travels is only a story about a guy having a real fun time among big people and little people and horses and stuff like that. What the book was about was something else. Fantasy can carry quite a serious burden, and so can humor. So what you’re saying is, strip away the trolls and the dwarves and things and put everyone into modern dress, get them to agonize a bit, mention Virginia Woolf a few times, and there! Hey! I’ve got a serious novel. But you don’t actually have to do that.

(Pauses) That was a bloody good answer, though I say it myself.”
Terry Pratchett

“...literature gives you ideas to think with. It stocks your mind. It does not indoctrinate, because diversity, counter-argument, reappraisal and qualification are its essence. But it supplies the materials for thought. Also, because it is the only art capable of criticism, it encourages questioning, and self-questioning.”
John Carey, What Good Are the Arts?

Yyib badge
Patrick
180 books | 10 friends

Ellen C...
1,774 books | 554 friends

Cory Sh...
111 books | 29 friends

Melody
80 books | 12 friends

Basel
153 books | 8 friends

Marc Tytus
24 books | 59 friends

Karl
199 books | 44 friends

Max
Max
49 books | 7 friends

More friends…


Polls voted on by Fraser

Lists liked by Fraser