The History Book Club discussion

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FAVORITES! AND NOT SO FAVORITES > BOOKS THAT TOP YOUR LIST

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 02, 2010 04:48AM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
This is a thread to discuss your favorite books.

Let us know which genre or area of interest that they belong to.

It would be nice to hear a little about these books and why you feel that they are tops on your list.

Since this The History Book Club and primarily a non fiction group; I hope that there will be more than a few of this genre.

Let us know what kind genre your book belongs to. Is it pure history, and/or another non fiction book, is it historical fiction, is it a novel which mentions certain events in history, mysteries, thrillers, pulp fiction, military focus, etc.

Please be sure to follow our guidelines and use the "add book/author" feature so that the powerful goodreads software can do its job. Please make sure that your adds look like the examples in post 2. Make sure to add the book cover, the author's photo if available, and always the author's link.

Regards,

Bentley


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
HISTORY

From Dawn to Decadence 500 Years of Western Cultural Life 1500 to the Present by Jacques Barzun by Jacques Barzun Jacques Barzun

Jacques Barzun must have a brain the size of the planet. The above book was the equivalent of taking a four year college program. When you finished the book, you certainly knew of many areas that you could study further and more of what you did not know about.

HARDBOILED DETECTIVE CRIME NOVEL:

The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler by Raymond Chandler Raymond Chandler

This book shows a master at work. It probably was the precursor of the private detective type of novel. Great plot, great character development in terms of private eye Philip Marlowe. A book that all who came after him have cited that they emulate along with Chandler himself.


message 3: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Hmmmm, very hard to select favourites but the book that grabbed my attention and caused me to buy soooo many other books on the Russian Front was; "Enemy at the Gates" by William Craig. It may not be the best book on the market covering the subject now but at the time it was great and I still think it would be on the top ten of most peoples list who read about WW2.

World War Two
Enemy at the gates The Battle for Stalingrad by William Craig by William Craig

Another book that did the same thing for me covering the Great War was Martin Middlebrook's account of the Somme; "The First Day on the Somme".

World War One
The First Day on the Somme by Martin Middlebrook by Martin Middlebrook


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 02, 2010 02:49PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
These both look great.

I have to add an historical fiction book which I absolutely loved - it really is a combination of an historical novel and a war novel and has a large dose of philosophy thrown in.

RUSSIAN LITERATURE - NAPOLEONIC ERA

Epic in scale, War and Peace delineates in graphic detail events leading up to Napoleon's invasion of Russia, and the impact of the Napoleonic era on Tsarist society, as seen through the eyes of five Russian aristocratic families.

Portions of an earlier version having been serialized in the magazine The Russian Messenger between 1865 and 1867, the novel was first published in its entirety in 1869. Newsweek in 2009 ranked it top of its list of Top 100 Books.


War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy Leo Tolstoy Leo Tolstoy


message 5: by Michael (last edited Oct 03, 2010 06:45AM) (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) I would have to say the book I have read recenyly which has got me most excited is
For All the Tea in China Espionage, Empire and the Secret Formula of the World's Favourite Drink by Sarah Rose Sarah Rose Sarah Rose . This is one of those little gems that get me really excited, a book bought on a whim on a subject I had no real previous interest in(tea)and enthralled me. I have no doubt be boring my family and friends up the wall reciting all the interesting history I got from this book.

Oh by the way may I suugest to all that they try Big Red Robe Oolong (Da Hong Pao) tea. Check out this link and look at the price for the tea from the original bushes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Da_Hong_...


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Amazing that anybody would spend that kind of money for what amounts to a cup of tea. It gives an entirely different meaning to inviting someone over to have a cup of tea.

That book though sounds great.


message 7: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (last edited Oct 03, 2010 08:41AM) (new)

André (andrh) | 2849 comments Mod
I would pick books that I read some while ago, their stories staying with me ever since and I would want to read over and over again.

As Bentley will have guessed I can't just pick one...
But here are a few (all fiction):

All the Pretty Horses (Border Trilogy, #1) by Cormac McCarthy by Cormac McCarthy Cormac McCarthy
To me it's unique in the way that it combines deep friendship, adventure, love of the wild and nature, really marvelous horses until you get the break with shocking violence. And back to friendship, nature etc. but the young men have changed, as will have you as the reader.

City Of Bones (Harry Bosch, #8) by Michael Connelly by Michael Connelly Michael Connelly
I'm a big fan of Michael Connelly's writing. His deep sense of humanity, character building and story telling are amongst the best. I could pick any one of his novels yet decided to take this one because although you expect things to go towards Bosch finding out about the murder mystery things develop so very differently. One of my all time favorite writers!

In the Blue Light of African Dreams by Paul Watkins by Paul Watkins
I'll never understand why Paul Watkins has not received more attention. A terrific writer, perfectly at home in both fiction and non-fiction. I picked this one since it is one of my favorite adventure novels. 1926 North Africa. A pilot learns about the Orteig Prize, offered to the first man to fly between Paris and New York. FABULOUS!!!!!

Désert by Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio by Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio
Nobody can write about nature, North Africa and children's wonder like JMG Le Clézio

The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold by Alice Sebold Alice Sebold
a deep story about love, memory, loss, joy, heaven and healing.

Gates of Fire An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae by Steven Pressfield Steven Pressfield Steven Pressfield
Simply historical fiction at its best. Nuff said.


Blueberry, les monts de la superstition La Mine de l'Allemand perdu - Le Spectre aux balles d'or (Coffret tomes 11 et 12) by Jean Giraud Jean Giraud
Graphic storytelling can't get any better than this. The adventure, characters, the pace, the drawing - a pure delight.

Have fun!


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Some of these I am very familiar with and they are terrific; but others may become new friends. Thanks Andre.


message 9: by Chris (new)

Chris Abel (abelchr) | 13 comments Bentley wrote: "HISTORY

From Dawn to Decadence 500 Years of Western Cultural Life 1500 to the Present by Jacques Barzun by Jacques BarzunJacques Barzun

Jacques Barzun must hav..."


Bentley,

I've never read The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler , but I love the movie with Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. How do you think the movie compares to the book?


message 10: by Alisa (last edited Oct 03, 2010 02:32PM) (new)

Alisa (mstaz) Eccentric, hilarious, witty, a little pathetic, vivid, and very entertaining. It has something of a cult following, and might be my most favorite book ever ~
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole by John Kennedy Toole John Kennedy Toole
it has nothing to do with history unless you looking for significance in the Lucky Dog carts of New Orleans.


message 11: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) Thriller murder mystery, he creates tension and suspense at a whole new level. I have not liked his other books nearly as much but this one was awesome. Good twists and a bit twisted.
Mercy by David L. Lindsey byDavid L. Lindsey


message 12: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new)

Vicki Cline | 3835 comments Mod
The beginning of a series of historical mysteries set in ancient Rome.
Roman Blood (Roma Sub Rosa, #1) by Steven Saylor by Steven Saylor Steven Saylor

This book is what started my interest in Roman history.


message 13: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 03, 2010 04:26PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Chris wrote: "Bentley wrote: "HISTORY

From Dawn to Decadence 500 Years of Western Cultural Life 1500 to the Present by Jacques Barzun by Jacques BarzunJacques Barzun

Jacques..."


You know I loved the movie; but I love the book better. This book really was the Bible for everyone who came after Chandler. Chandler was amazing. I just heard Michael Chabon speaking about how much he owed Chandler. And I think this book was tops. I reread Chandler regularly.

Michael Chabon Michael Chabon


message 14: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) The author that really got me interested in the Indochina War and later Vietnam was Bernard Fall, author of two classic accounts, yet to be bettered (I think):



Street Without Joy The French Debacle In Indochina (Stackpole Military History Series) by Bernard B. Fall & Hell in a Very Small Place The Siege of Dien Bien Phu by Bernard B. Fall by Bernard B. Fall
Bernard B. Fall


message 15: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) My all time favourite book covering the Napoleonic period has to be "La Grande Armee" by Georges Blond. It may not be the most in-depth account but I found it one of the best to read, really drawing me into this period of history with all its colour, glory and history.

La Grande Armee by Georges Blond by Georges Blond


message 16: by 'Aussie Rick' (last edited Oct 09, 2010 05:23PM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) The one book that started my interest in the British Empire in Africa was; "The Washing of the Spears", which is still seen as 'the' book on the Zulu Wars.

The Washing of the Spears A History of the Rise of the Zulu Nation Under Shaka and Its Fall in the Zulu War of 1879 by Donald R. Morris by Donald R. Morris
"This book is not only a history of the Zulus, the 'Black Spartans', from their rise under Shaka to the deliberated destruction of the independent Zulu nation through the war forced on them by Sir Bartle Frere, but also a full-scale immensely knowledgeable account of the British Colonial and military policy in relation to Southern Africa, and of the men who carried it out." - PUNCH


message 17: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig 'Aussie Rick' wrote: "The author that really got me interested in the Indochina War and later Vietnam was Bernard Fall, author of two classic accounts, yet to be bettered (I think):



[bookcover:Street Without Joy:..."


Interesting. Fall helped bring Senator Edward Kennedy to change his thinking about the Vietnam War.


message 18: by John (last edited Oct 23, 2010 12:19PM) (new)

John E | 105 comments If not at the top of my list of favorite books, then in the top three actually has a historical setting. It is Catch-22 by Joseph Heller by Joseph Heller This novel of World War II knocked by off my feet when I first read it in college in the 1960s and still does every time I re-read it.


message 19: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) John wrote: "If not at the top of my list of favorite books, then in the top three actually has a historical setting. It is Catch-22 by Joseph Heller by Joseph Heller This novel of World Wa..."
Great book. Don't forget the author link in addition to the cover and author photo. Great add John.


Catch-22 by Joseph Heller by Joseph Heller Joseph Heller


message 20: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new)

Vicki Cline | 3835 comments Mod
John wrote: "If not at the top of my list of favorite books, then in the top three actually has a historical setting. It is Catch-22 by Joseph Heller by Joseph Heller This novel of World Wa..."

I concur. It's alternately hysterically funny and heartbreaking.


message 21: by B. P. (new)

B. P. Rinehart (ken_moten) | 39 comments The book that I would recommend to anyone overall would be Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison by Ralph Ellison. I read this book in 8th grade and it has profoundly changed my perception of the world and my place in it ever since.


message 22: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig From Don:

I always enjoy reading history books that reveal new information that is different than the prevailing version of history. Three books I would recommend include FDR's Deadly Secret by Eric Fettmann, a convincing argument that Roosevelt did not die from cerebral hemorrhage, but rather cancer that began as melanoma. Robert B. Beginner's Day of Deceit: The Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor examines evidence that suggests Roosevelt knew about Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor beforehand. He let it happen so that America would enter the war and help England. Civilization One: The World Is Not as You Thought it Was by Christopher Knight claims that there is evidence that early civilizations have a common heritage. Sorry I don't have hyperlinks for these books; I am typing this on my kindle.

What books that challenge established history do you recommend?

FDR's Deadly Secret by Eric Fettmann Eric Fettmann

Day Of Deceit The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor by Robert B. Stinnett Robert B. Stinnett

Civilization One The World Is Not as You Thought it Was by Christopher Knight Christopher Knight


message 23: by Jill (last edited Aug 07, 2014 11:19AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Not so favorite

I'll tell you one that I don't recommend. What would you think if you are a reader of the history of the Great War and the author's forward states that he doesn't know much about WWI?....and it went downhill from there.

The Myth of the Great War A New Military History of World War I by John Mosier by John Mosier

Favorite

It is impossible to name my favorite history book since there are many but the book noted below may be one of the greatest histories of Nazi Germany.

The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich A History of Nazi Germany by William L. Shirer by William L. Shirer William L. Shirer


message 24: by Mark (last edited Dec 03, 2013 02:23PM) (new)

Mark Mortensen I just finished reading “Feet First” (copyright 1971) a memoir by Ben Finney. The book in circulation for over 40 years is so obscure that I can not locate a review or even a synopsis on the internet.

The front dust jacket of the hardcover “Feet First” has a bold photo of Finney and his lifelong friend Ernest Hemmingway sitting side by side on the back of a boat with bare feet in the air. To say Ben Finney lived life in the 20th Century is an understatement as the tough nut Marine loved to party. Each tale is revealing and I will recall a few of his self professed hilarious pranks until the day I die.

The book is now one of my favorites as noted in my posted review.

Feet First by Ben Finney by Ben Finney (no photo)

Finney is also the author of "Once A Marine Always A Marine" with the foreward by his good Friend USMC General Lem Shepherd the 20th Commandant of the Marine Corps.

Once a Marine-Always a Marine (no cover) by Ben Finney (no photo)


message 25: by Peter (new)

Peter Flom Oh, I didn't know about this thread! Like many people here, I've got lots of favorites but here are some:

Science Fiction

Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson by Neal Stephenson Neal Stephenson Reading this book is like riding three express trains at once as Stephenson follows three plots on two timelines (WW II era and present day). This book reads like science fiction, but also contains a lot of history. Lots of information on codes, espionage, mining, Douglas MacArthur, the Philippines, data havens and (let's not forget) the ideal way to eat Captain Crunch cereal.


Small Gods (Discworld, #13) by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett. Very hard to pick a favorite DiscWorld novel, but I think this is it. Here, Pratchett skewers fundamentalist religion. In the land of Omnia, everyone believes in Om. You'd better, or the quisition will get you. But, while everyone believes, only the hero of the book, the simple Brutha, BELIEVES. And, since Gods grow and shrink depending on the number of believers, right now Om is a small God (a turtle).

Biography

Incompleteness The Proof and Paradox of Kurt Gödel (Great Discoveries) by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein bt Rebecca Newberger Goldstein Rebecca Newberger Goldstein. Kurt Godel was one strange genius. Goldstein, who is both a philosopher and a novelist, captures both aspects of the man and does so beautifully.

History

Ideas A History of Thought and Invention, from Fire to Freud by Peter Watson by Peter Watson Peter Watson

This is what the subtitle says. Breathtaking in scope and erudition and also nicely written.


message 26: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Great suggestions, Peter, thank you!


message 27: by Peter (new)

Peter Flom Some more

Young Adult/SF

A Wrinkle in Time (Time, #1) by Madeleine L'Engle by Madeleine L'Engle Madeleine L'Engle

When I was 10, I got sick with something or other (measles maybe?). My mother gave me this book. I read it. Then I read it again. This is the book that turned me from someone who knew how to read into a READER.

Briefly, it concerns the adventures of Meg, Charles Wallace, Calvin and several strange women as they battle "IT" - a manifestation of evil.

Philosophy ?/Computers/Math/Logic/Music

Gödel, Escher, Bach An Eternal Golden Braid by Douglas R. Hofstadter by Douglas R. Hofstadter Douglas R. Hofstadter

Nearly impossible to categorize, but this book is all about the phenomena of recursion and self-reference. Brilliant and deep.

Thrillers

The Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth by Frederick Forsyth Frederick Forsyth

The first book that kept me up all night reading.

Some right wing Frenchmen, enraged by the loss of Algeria, have decided to assassinate Charles de Gaulle. They hire "the jackal" to do it. He has his wits and some money and the French leader's refusal to change his plans for security reasons. His opposition has the entire legal and military establishment of France.


message 28: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Great suggestions Peter, Mike, Mark, Jill, Bryan, Ken, Vicki, Michael, Andre, Aussie Rick, Michael, Chris, Alisa.

Folks, keep them coming.


message 29: by Jill (last edited Aug 07, 2014 11:18AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Fiction

Not so favorite

I hate to admit this but I just can't get into anything by Henry James. I have tried The Turn of the Screw at least three times but just couldn't get through it. He takes 5 pages to make one statement......his book are way too verbose for me but I think I am in the minority.

The Turn of the Screw by Henry James by Henry James Henry James


message 30: by Hudson (last edited Apr 15, 2014 11:53AM) (new)

Hudson (bostonrich) | 20 comments For me the books that tops my list are the Aubrey/Maturin series by Patrick O'Brian.
The first book which was made in to a popular movie was:
Master and Commander (Aubrey/Maturin, #1) by Patrick O'Brian by Patrick O'Brian Patrick O'Brian The entire series is twenty one books long and tells the story of an English sea captain and his medical doctor during the Napoleonic Wars. Beautifully written and vast in scale this series would probably be enjoyed by any fan of historical fiction.


message 31: by Jeannine (new)

Jeannine (jmloftus13) | 40 comments Wow.. what a tough one to answer. I don't have one (or even a few) single favorite(s) and I don't generally re-read because there are so many books yet to be read the first time. The book that launched me on my love of history was David Halberstam's bool titled "The Fifties". Similar to many others I thought history was terribly boring because of what (and the way) I learned in HS/College. It wasn't until I was an adult I picked up that book and fell head over heels in love with History. I realized it was interesting and enlightening on so many levels.

The Fifties by David Halberstam by David Halberstam David Halberstam

In a similar way I fell in love with well written historical fiction reading A Voices in The Wind by Francine Rivers. It gave me a view of what History was like in the first Christian Century which launched me to then read many more books and some primary sources on the topic that rounded about my reading of the Bible.

A Voice in the Wind (Mark of the Lion, #1) by Francine Rivers by Francine Rivers Francine Rivers

Holy Bible New International Version by Anonymous by, (I couldn't find an image or an author link for God) :-)


message 32: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Nice, Jeannine, lol, about the Bible. You can use Goodread's default:

Holy Bible King James Version by Anonymous by Anonymous (no photo)


message 33: by Donna (last edited Apr 23, 2014 12:05PM) (new)

Donna (drspoon) I've been a huge nonfiction reader for ever, but since retiring 6 years ago, I've fallen in love with historical fiction as well. Often I pair fiction and nonfiction books about a similar topic. Here's a favorite pairing:

HISTORICAL FICTION

Chesapeake by James A. Michener by James A. Michener James A. Michener

Follows several fictional families in the Chesapeake Bay area from the 16th to 20th centuries. Each section begins with a journey. I can't see a flock of geese overhead without thinking about this book.

NONFICTION/HISTORY

The River Where America Began A Journey Along the James by Bob Deans by Bob Deans(no photo)

I love how this book focuses on the iconic James River and the interplay of cultures - British, African, and Native American - from early civilization to the end of the Civil War. Very beautifully written.


message 34: by Judy (new)

Judy (dujyt) | 93 comments Donna wrote: "I've been a huge nonfiction reader for ever, but since retiring 6 years ago, I've fallen in love with historical fiction as well. Often I pair fiction and nonfiction books about a similar topic. ..."

I do this also, Donna. Great to find someone else who likes to get their history in different flavors. :-)


message 35: by Karen (last edited Aug 07, 2014 06:54AM) (new)

Karen (karinlib) To Name a favorite book is a bit like naming your favorite child, when you have more than one.

I rarely read a book more than once, except for a select few:

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee by Harper Lee Harper Lee

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank by Anne Frank Anne Frank

The Chosen by Chaim Potok by Chaim Potok Chaim Potok

If I had to name a favorite author, it would be Chaim Potok. I have read all of his books, more than once.


message 36: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Great choices, Karen, thank you for sharing.


message 37: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) Karen I love your comment. It is impossible to name just one favorite! The more I read the more favorites I accumulate. It keeps me reading more. A delicious conundrum!

I have not read a lot of baseball books, but consider myself a fan of America's great pasttime. For me, Bottom of the 33rd was a wonderful story that had a way of illustrating the quirks, rich history, personalities, and art and science of this wonderful sport.
BASEBALL
Bottom of the 33rd Hope, Redemption, and Baseball's Longest Game by Dan Barry by Dan Barry (no photo)

There is something about the sports history book I find quite fascinating, and the best of these types of books weave in the history of the time as well as the dimensions of the sport. The Boys in the Boat is about an unlikely university rowing crew who competed for the Gold in the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, often referred to as Hitler's Olympics. Amazing story, expertly written, could not put it down.

ROWING/OLYMPICS/HITLER'S GERMANY
The Boys in the Boat Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown by Daniel James Brown Daniel James Brown


message 38: by [deleted user] (new)

Power and Plenty by Findlay & O'Rourke - a great book about the history of geopolitics of international trade/globalization. Highly topical issue now with the rise of China and all its consequences on the global system. One of my favourite history books recently.Power and Plenty: Trade, War, and the World Economy in the Second Millennium Power and Plenty Trade, War, and the World Economy in the Second Millennium by Ronald Findlay


message 39: by Bryan (last edited Aug 08, 2014 06:42AM) (new)

Bryan Craig Looks good, Iana, I think I will have to add this to my reading pile.

Good attempt at the citation. Just need cover and author link:

Power and Plenty Trade, War, and the World Economy in the Second Millennium by Ronald Findlay by Ronald Findlay (no photo)


message 40: by Mary Ellen (new)

Mary Ellen | 184 comments Thanks to this thread, my mental TBR list is becoming even more unmanageable. And list of "favorites," almost as unmanageable. So, I'll mention a couple that I've read recently and recommend.

HISTORICAL FICTION

A Place of Greater Safety by Hilary Mantel by Hilary Mantel Hilary Mantel

Mantel has gotten a lot of attention for her books centering on Thomas Cromwell. This earlier novel of the French Revolution, following Robespierre, Danton and Desmoulins from their childhood to the Terror, was just as compelling though less focused.

MYSTERY

Sacred Clowns (Navajo Mysteries, #11) by Tony Hillerman by Tony Hillerman Tony Hillerman

I enjoyed all the books in Hillerman's Leaphorn/Chee series but I think this one is my favorite.


message 41: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Nice, Mary Ellen, we strive to create large TBR piles here at the HBC :-)


message 42: by Stuart (new)

Stuart Shapiro | 18 comments History:

Guns, Germs, and Steel The Fates of Human Societies by Jared Diamond by Jared Diamond Jared Diamond

Historical Fiction:

Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry by Larry McMurtry Larry McMurtry


message 43: by Jill (last edited Sep 29, 2014 11:02AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Mystery

The Rex Stout Nero Wolfe books are at the top of my list but there is another, not very well known book that is right up there too.

Death Walks in Eastrepps by Francis Beeding by Francis Beeding

Rex Stout Rex Stout


message 44: by Isidor (new)

Isidor | 2 comments Morality Play by Barry Unsworth
A very special piece of historical crime fiction (which I don't usually read), but much more than that.


message 45: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Isidore..........please use the book citation guidelines as noted in the link below.

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Your book should look like this:

Morality Play by Barry Unsworth by Barry Unsworth Barry Unsworth


message 46: by Carlton (last edited Jan 06, 2016 01:50PM) (new)

Carlton | 21 comments Isidor
If you enjoyed Morality Play by Barry Unsworth by Barry Unsworth Barry Unsworth
then you might like to try
Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks by Geraldine Brooks Geraldine Brooks (historical fiction) - but I see you already have
or
English Passengers by Matthew Kneale by Matthew Kneale Matthew Kneale
English Passengers (historical fiction) is about a 19th century ship journey to Australia.
If the Black Death itself was interesting, I recently read The Great Mortality An Intimate History of the Black Death, the Most Devastating Plague of All Time by John Kelly The Great Mortality: An Intimate History of the Black Death, the Most Devastating Plague of All Time by John Kelly John Kelly, which was a fairly "light" non-fiction read, if about a somewhat gruesome topic.


message 47: by Dimitri (new)

Dimitri | 600 comments Carlton wrote: "If the Black Death itself was interesting, I recently read The Great Mortality An Intimate History of the Black Death, the Most Devastating Plague of All Time by John Kelly by John KellyJohn Kelly, , which was a fairly "light" non-fiction read, if about a somewhat gruesome topic. "

Then you might also enjoy The Black Death by Philip Ziegler by Philip Ziegler Philip Ziegler


message 48: by Carlton (new)

Carlton | 21 comments Dimitri wrote: "Carlton wrote: "If the Black Death itself was interesting, I recently read The Great Mortality An Intimate History of the Black Death, the Most Devastating Plague of All Time by John Kelly by..."
Thanks for the suggestion Dimitri. I have the Ziegler, which I started some years ago, but found it very "dry" (little human interest), which is why I later found and read The Great Mortality An Intimate History of the Black Death, the Most Devastating Plague of All Time by John Kelly


message 49: by Jill (last edited Jan 06, 2016 07:18PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Carlton.......good recommendations.

Please put all the books you mentioned at the bottom of the post for easier reading. You also might want to visit our guidelines for book citations at: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/....

You did a great job....but one little nit. the book English Passengers does have a book cover and should look like this.

English Passengers by Matthew Kneale by Matthew Kneale Matthew Kneale


message 50: by C.H. (last edited Sep 25, 2019 12:09PM) (new)

C.H. Colman An historical novel that haunts me with its beauty is Colum McCann's TransAtlantic, long-listed for the 2013 Mann Booker Prize. The book weaves the stories of Alcock and Brown, Frederick Douglass, and Senator George Mitchell's leadership role in the Irish Peace process. It helps that I heard McCann speak on this book and his close relationship and respect for Senator Mitchell. This is a worthy read that captures the suspense of great historical events.

TransAtlantic by Colum McCann by Colum McCann Colum McCann


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