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Archives > [2021] Poll 6 Voting

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message 1: by Jackie, Solstitial Mod (last edited Aug 01, 2020 07:47AM) (new)

Jackie | 1407 comments Mod
It's now time to get ready to vote for our sixth set of prompts! The thread will be open for at least 24 hours before the poll gets posted. This is a good opportunity to ask any question you may have regarding the prompts, do some research or ask for recommendations.

Voting will open on Saturday, August 1 and results will be posted in the morning of Wednesday, August 5 (CST time).

How it works:
- When the voting opens, follow the link to the mini-poll that will be added at the end of this post
- You have a total of 8 votes this poll to spread across your favorite and least favorite prompts (you can also use less than 8 votes) - You can find examples of acceptable voting practices on the Introduction thread.
- The prompts with the more favorable votes (comparing top votes to bottom votes, and looking at the overall number of votes it received) will be added to the final list (between 2 and 5 depending on how the votes are spread)

We are asking people to include their Goodreads profile address when they vote. To find this, just go to your own profile and then copy the URL/web address. If for some reason you can't link to your Goodreads profile, please post your full Goodreads name with enough identifiable information that we'll be able to access your profile. We’ve introduced this for two reasons:

1. On a few occasions in each poll, people have used more than the allotted number of votes, either because they aren’t familiar with the rules or just by mistake. When this happens our only option is to disregard the vote as we can’t identify the voter to ask them to resubmit. By asking for your profile address we’ll be able to message you and ask you to vote again if you’ve accidentally used more than the allotted number of votes.

2. Unfortunately a very small number of people have voted more than once per poll and so we are asking for this information to prevent duplicate votes.

As a reminder: You have a total of 8 votes to use among your top and bottom votes. The mods have access to each individual vote, so we can see if you use more than 8 votes. If you use more than 8 votes in the poll, your vote will have to be deleted, so please make sure to follow the directions so your voice can be heard.

Possible Prompts:
1. A book featuring a prominent role for a mineral (cover, title, author’s name, or story)
2. A book with a travel theme
3. A book with a pronoun in the title
4. A book from one of Goodreads' "Most Popular" lists
5. A book written by a Nobel Prize Winning author
6. A book inspired by the lyrics to REM’s “It's The End Of The World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)"
7. A cross genre novel (scifi horror, fantasy romance, historical mystery etc)
8. A book that related to traditions around turning 21
9. A children's book award nominee or winner
10. A book related to a person featured in a Google doodle
11. Read a novella
12. A book with a title that contains an alliteration
13. A book that won an award for a genre you don’t often read
14. A book written by or about a person with a physical disability
15. A book with a color in the title

Feel free to discuss the prompts below, but please remember to be respectful to the other group members.

VOTE HERE: https://www.surveymoz.com/s/2Y77YZ/


message 2: by Jackie, Solstitial Mod (new)

Jackie | 1407 comments Mod
1. A book featuring a prominent role for a mineral (cover, title, author’s name, or story)
Mineral: doesn’t grow, isn’t alive, and comes from the ground, including things made primarily of rocks or metals.

Title examples: “On the Road”, “ And the Mountains Echoed, “, Guns, Germs and Steel”, “The Nickel Boys”, “The Bronze Horsemen”, The Sword in the Stone, “Three Day Road“, “Queen of Swords”, “The Hammer of Eden”

Mineral-related jobs (miners, jewellers, jewelry burglars, masons, soldiers/sailors, pilots, drivers, weapons makers/users)

Author names, Pierre, Stone, Ruby, Steel, Mason

Story related: quarry (Pillars of the Earth), castles, buildings (hotel at the corner of bittersweet), ships (The Shipping News” ), planes, trains, automobiles, weapons, jewelry, mountains, hills, rocks

It turns out that the “traditional“ gift for a 21st wedding anniversary (I’m not sure how many cultures this tradition applies to) is brass or nickel, so minerals would fit well with the year 21 without being too restrictive (although someone who wants to BIO it could restrict minerals to only these two).


3. A book with a pronoun in the title
examples: I, you, she/her, he/his, they/theirs

4. A book from one of Goodreads' "Most Popular" lists
https://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/1...
https://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/1...
https://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/1...
https://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/1...


5. A book written by a Nobel Prize Winning author
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prize...

6. A book inspired by the lyrics to REM’s “It's The End Of The World As We Know (And I Feel Fine)"
https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/rem/i...

8. A book that related to traditions around turning 21
https://cultursmag.com/the-global-per...

9. A children's book award nominee or winner
examples: Caldecott, Newberry

10. A book related to a person featured in a Google doodle
http://www.google.com/doodle

12. A book with a title that contains an alliteration
An alliteration is “the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely-connected words.” So, essentially, the title needs to contain at least two words that start with the same letter or sound.

I added a bunch of examples from my own TBR to this list, but there are over 900 titles for you to get examples: https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/9...


13. A book that won an award for a genre you don’t often read
examples: Newbery for children’s books, the Alex Award for young adult, the Rita for romance, the Edgar for mystery, the Spur for Western, the Booker for lit fic, the Hugo for sci-fi or fantasy, the National Book Award for non-fiction


message 3: by Stefanie (new)

Stefanie (absinthereader) | 11 comments I like many of these... Will probably downvote the ones that have winners or nominees things. Have had some problems with them the last few years.

Will definitelly upvote the Google doodle one and the physical disability one!


message 4: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 101 comments I just realized my suggestion should rather be "A book written by or about a PERSON with a physical disability." rather than character, since it includes the author.

Can we change that?

Alliteration was on the Popsugar list in 2018. I'm sure, there are lots of recommendation here:
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 5: by Serendipity (new)

Serendipity | 441 comments Nothing really excites me at first glance. The crops genre prompt is my only definite upvote. Google doodle maybe, although I wish it wasn’t limited to a person. Book that won an award for a genre you don’t often read maybe - although again it’s not exactly what I’d prefer. Off to do some more research .


message 6: by Steven (new)

Steven McCreary | 141 comments I loved the We Didn't Start the Fire prompt this year. Will definitely be voting for the REM prompt for next year.


message 7: by Nancy (new)

Nancy (fancynancyt) | 1067 comments Serendipity wrote: "Nothing really excites me at first glance. The crops genre prompt is my only definite upvote. Google doodle maybe, although I wish it wasn’t limited to a person. Book that won an award for a genre ..."

You know, I missed that the Google Doodle is specific to a person. I do like the idea but limiting to a person may mean I won't vote for it. I'd rather see it just related to a Google Doodle.


message 8: by Rosemary (last edited Jul 31, 2020 02:19PM) (new)

Rosemary | 410 comments I may be too late with this but could I suggest that "14. A book written by or about a character with a physical disability" is reworded to "... by or about a person with a physical disability"? Books are written by people, not characters, and it seems dismissive of authors with disabilities to describe them as characters (although I'm sure it was not intentional).

OK, just saw that someone has already suggested this. I hope it can be done.


message 9: by Nancy (new)

Nancy (fancynancyt) | 1067 comments I think I worded it that way in the discussion thread and it definitely was not intentional to be dismissive, just poor grammar on my part.


message 10: by Jill (new)

Jill | 602 comments I think August 5th is a Wednesday, not Friday. 😊


message 11: by Jackie, Solstitial Mod (new)

Jackie | 1407 comments Mod
Nicole wrote: "I just realized my suggestion should rather be "A book written by or about a PERSON with a physical disability." rather than character, since it includes the author.

Can we change that?

Alliter..."


Yes, I can make that change


message 12: by Joyce (new)

Joyce | 359 comments I missed the word “it” when copying and pasting and, of course, it should read “It’s The End Of The World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)” for the REM song title.

Btw, since Lenny Bruce is mentioned twice in the lyrics his autobiographical How to Talk Dirty and Influence People is pretty fascinating.


message 13: by Jackie, Solstitial Mod (new)

Jackie | 1407 comments Mod
Jill wrote: "I think August 5th is a Wednesday, not Friday. 😊"

Would you believe I opened my calendar to check before I wrote that?


message 14: by Jackie, Solstitial Mod (new)

Jackie | 1407 comments Mod
Joyce wrote: "I missed the word “it” when copying and pasting and, of course, it should read “It’s The End Of The World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)” for the REM song title.

Btw, since Lenny Bruce is mention..."


Will fix!


message 15: by Emily, Conterminous Mod (new)

Emily Bourque (emilyardoin) | 7578 comments Mod
Wow I missed the entire suggestions thread (and most of the Wild Discussion for the last few days), so all of these are a surprise for me.

I'm really in the mood for some character driven prompts, so I may vote the Google Doodle. I found this list (which is massive.

https://www.ranker.com/list/famous-pe...

That being said, it does feel very wide open so I may think on it some more.

I'm also a sucker for lists and awards, so the "won an award for a genre you don't normally read" would be a fun one. I read pretty widely, but there are some genres I read more frequently than others, so I'd probably pick a sci-fi, fantasy, or romance book. And since it doesn't specify which award, I may use the GR choice awards since those are less... lofty.

Some others I may vote for: cross genre, character with a physical disability, and travel theme.


message 16: by Nancy (new)

Nancy (fancynancyt) | 1067 comments Copied from The Wild Discussion thread at Emily's suggestion.

I've found some really great books from children's book awards, they're often thought-provoking and address current issues. A lot of people read children's books even if they don't have kids or their kids are older. Caldecott is for picture books, but Newbery is more broadly any children's book.

So for example, here's the blurb on this year's Newbery winner, which I'd never heard of until now:

"New Kid, written and illustrated by Jerry Craft, published by Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Jordan Banks can’t help seeing privilege when he transfers to Riverdale Academy Day School for seventh grade. As one of the few African American students in the school, he regularly deals with racism and microaggressions. Craft creates an intimate, relatable world inviting readers in, and holds them there.

“This distinct, timely, and honest story respects children and gives its readers a glimpse into what it means to be other,” said Newbery Medal Committee Chair Krishna Grady."

New Kid is a graphic novel geared toward middle schoolers. I think it's important to know what kids are reading and what books make an impact on them, even if you don't have kids.

Also, Caldecott and Newbery are suggestions, it can be any children's book award from any country. I'd even think the Goodreads awards would count, they have children's book categories.


message 17: by Amanda (last edited Jul 31, 2020 02:52PM) (new)

Amanda | 64 comments If this helps anyone considering the "pronoun in the title" prompt--there are many more pronouns than people may immediately think of. Here's a list of many of them in English (although I'm sure I'm missing some):

I/me/my/mine/myself, you/your/yours/yourself/yourselves, he/him/his/himself, she/her/hers/herself, it/its/itself, they/them/their/theirs/themselves, we/our/ours/ourselves, who, whom, whose, what, which, whoever, whichever, whomever, anybody, anyone, anything, everything, everybody, everyone, nobody, no one, nothing, somebody, someone, something, another, either, neither, this, that, these, those, none, such, one, each, both, few, many, several, all, any, most, some

Just be careful because a lot of these can be used as other parts of speech in addition to pronouns, so check to make sure it's being used as a pronoun in the title. (i.e. "This shirt is blue." (adjective) vs. "This is new." (pronoun))


message 18: by Mary Beth (new)

Mary Beth (marybethw) | 29 comments Nobel Prize winner-- Is this exclusive to the Nobel Prize Winner in literature? There are many Nobel Peace Prize Winners that are also authors.... Malala Yousafzai, Barack Obama, and Nelson Mandela come to mind. I am sure there are others.


message 19: by Hilde (new)

Hilde (hilded) | 794 comments Good point, Mary Beth. As the one who suggested it, I would say it is not exclusive to literature, and should be open to every winner, regardless of category. (The link for examples is only to the literature price though, sorry about that).


message 20: by dalex (new)

dalex (912dalex) | 1734 comments The google doodle one can be a bit overwhelming considering the many thousands of doodles there are to choose from.

Here's a suggestion for what I did to narrow things down a bit...

1. I thought of a common theme in books I enjoy reading - strong female characters.
2. I googled and found a list of ten women who were pioneers in some way.
3. I searched the google doodles archive for each of those ten women. Four of them have google doodles.

Now I know I can use any book with a strong female character, knowing it relates to a doodle. Or I can be a bit more specific and choose something connected to one of those women - a suffragette, a surgeon, an environmentalist, a political activist.


message 21: by Mary Beth (new)

Mary Beth (marybethw) | 29 comments Hilde wrote: "Good point, Mary Beth. As the one who suggested it, I would say it is not exclusive to literature, and should be open to every winner, regardless of category. (The link for examples is only to the ..."

No problem! I just wanted to clarify and I have Mandela's Autobiography on my TBR list for a while so its a good fit for me.Long Walk to Freedom Long Walk To Freedom (Volume 1 1918-1962) by Nelson Mandela


message 22: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Luchetti | 738 comments For the Google Doodle one, since it is limited to a person, does anyone have ideas on how to translate that into fiction writing, if possible?

I looked at the books I have about individuals that I would like to read next year, but Google Doodles haven't been created about them.


message 23: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 1355 comments Alicia wrote: "For the Google Doodle one, since it is limited to a person, does anyone have ideas on how to translate that into fiction writing, if possible?

I looked at the books I have about individuals that I..."



It's just "related to" so I'd count it if the book is set in the same country that the doodle person is from, or if the author is from that country.


message 24: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sezziy) | 603 comments Alicia wrote: "For the Google Doodle one, since it is limited to a person, does anyone have ideas on how to translate that into fiction writing, if possible?

I looked at the books I have about individuals that I..."


There are some authors who have doodles. I spotted Douglas Adams and Charlotte Bronte when I was looking through the archives and I'm sure there'll be a lot more in there


message 25: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sezziy) | 603 comments I am not a huge fan of list prompts usually. Most of the lists I either struggle to find something I want to read or I've read a huge chunk of them already (or sometimes my small library just doesn't have the ones I want to read!).

I suggested the Goodreads' Most Popular lists because, even in the genres I don't read often, I have at least one book on my TBR on each list.


message 26: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1796 comments I like the travel one because it'an opportunity for me to read a travel memoir but won't put off those who solely read fiction.

Also like the cross-genre, novella, children's award and REM prompts.

I can't help but reading that mineral prompt as the mineral being a character, obviously heard role used too much to describe people! 🤣

Not anything on this list that is terrible, last time Nobel winners came up I found one author I wanted to read. I need to go check the most popular lists but if they are what I'm thinking of I always find the selection a bit boring. As in they are books I've heard of a million times and will have read them already if I'm interested...


message 27: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1796 comments Is the attitude to children's books different in the US? Caught up with the wild discussion and surprised at the push back.

Lots of people in the UK read The Lie Tree the year it was in all the awards and it went on to win the overall Costa prize despite being a book for children. No one is saying you should read something designed for 5 year olds, these awards go right up to YA, and people didn't have problems reading Angie Thomas widely.


message 28: by dalex (new)

dalex (912dalex) | 1734 comments Alicia wrote: "For the Google Doodle one, since it is limited to a person, does anyone have ideas on how to translate that into fiction writing, if possible?”

1. I thought of a common theme in books I enjoy reading - strong female characters.
2. I googled and found a list of ten women who were pioneers in some way.
3. I searched the google doodles archive for each of those ten women. Four of them have google doodles.

Now I know I can use any book with a strong female character, knowing it relates to a doodle. Or I can be a bit more specific and choose something connected to one of those women - a suffragette, a surgeon, an environmentalist, a political activist.


message 29: by Johanne (new)

Johanne *the biblionaut* | 1646 comments I'm not enthusiastic about the 'traditions related to turning 21' as I don't have any relation to this. Where I live turning 21 isn't an important year, it's all 18 and a bit at 15, and I am not at all familiar with what these traditions would be.


message 30: by Johanne (new)

Johanne *the biblionaut* | 1646 comments ... I love the children's reward one.


message 31: by Johanne (new)

Johanne *the biblionaut* | 1646 comments *award


message 32: by Emily, Conterminous Mod (new)

Emily Bourque (emilyardoin) | 7578 comments Mod
Where I'm at, turning 21 means you can now drink alcohol and gamble. I'd probably use the reject prompt of related to a card game to connect it to gambling, if the prompt makes it in.


message 33: by Emily, Conterminous Mod (new)

Emily Bourque (emilyardoin) | 7578 comments Mod
For the children's award, what defines a child? Or an award for children's books? Would YA count, since they are not adults yet? (I'd probably definitely use this as a KIS option regardless since I don't really enjoy children's books)


message 34: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1796 comments I think the award or award category will say it's for children's books. YA is usually in the children's section in book shops so it generally falls under those awards.

The Waterstones Children's Book Prize and Carnegie Medal include young adult.


message 35: by Robin P, Orbicular Mod (new)

Robin P | 1930 comments Mod
Ellie wrote: "Is the attitude to children's books different in the US? Caught up with the wild discussion and surprised at the push back.

Lots of people in the UK read The Lie Tree the year it w..."


I think in the US many adults read children's and YA books. Harry Potter, the Narnia series, The Hunger Games, The Hate U Give, as was mentioned. I have enjoyed some children's or teen books on audio quite a lot, such as Bloody Jack andHowl's Moving Castle.

YA wasn't a category when I was a teenager, so I pretty much moved from children's to adult books.


message 36: by Entropia (last edited Aug 01, 2020 06:22AM) (new)

Entropia | 280 comments Alicia wrote: "For the Google Doodle one, since it is limited to a person, does anyone have ideas on how to translate that into fiction writing, if possible?"

1. country of origin of person in the doodle could be setting of a book, or country of origin of author of a book.
2. book could feature character of the same occupation as person in a doodle
3. you could read up on person in a doodle's life and choose book with some similar "plot points"
4. there are famous people who are featured as characters or otherwise referenced in fiction books, e.g Tesla, Da Vinci
5. read a fiction book by an author who has a doodle


message 37: by Marie (new)

Marie | 721 comments There are loads of children's books I've read and loved as an adult.

Terry Pratchett wrote a lot of books for kids that are just as good as the adult ones, and I'd struggle to tell the difference if someone else hadn't already categorised them. Same for Carl Hiaasen.

A Monster Calls made me cry more than anything else I've read. I didn't even know The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time was a children's book until I was looking at the awards lists last night. Same goes for The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, which has been on my TBR for ages. The Graveyard Book is excellent, so are My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece and Counting by 7s.

I think I could happily do an entire year of children's books (and another of YA). I wish we'd had this level of quality when I was a kid, enduring The Machine-Gunners and Stig of the Dump!


message 38: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Sterling | 452 comments Since the Google Doodles prompt is “related to” a person with a Google Doodle, I’m thinking that would also include books by people with Google Doodles, right? I mean, of course it could be a biography about one of those many people (there are over 1,200 on the list provided above, so that is a huge list), and could also be a book related to work that any of them have done, whether it be physics, mathematics, art, music, etc., or places they are from, but I would include books written specifically by them, as well. There were tons of authors on the list, including Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Robert Louis Stevenson, Beatrix Potter, Charles Dickens, Maurice Sendak, Mark Twain, and many more. It would also be good for many countries and different types of print media, because I saw a Japanese writer and feminist (Akiko Yosano), a Russian folklorist (Ivan Andreyevich Krylov), a Spanish writer and poet (Rosalía de Castro), a South Korean poet, novelist, and short story writer (Hwang Sun-won), a New Zealand crime writer (Ngaio Marsh), a French novelist and essayist (Marguerite Yourcenar), even the comic writer who created Popeye E.C. Segar. There are dozens, if not hundreds more, but those are just a few of the ones I happened across with a quick glance.


message 39: by Jackie, Solstitial Mod (new)

Jackie | 1407 comments Mod
Voting is now open: https://www.surveymoz.com/s/2Y77YZ/

Enjoy!


message 40: by Avery (last edited Aug 01, 2020 07:53AM) (new)

Avery (averyapproved) | 472 comments Hmm I really don't like this batch of suggestions (eek!), I feel like a debbie downer!

I'm not really interested in books related to certain authors or people as I find them either too narrow (children's book, Nobel Prize) or too broad (google doodle). The mineral prompt is a bit wordy to me, and feels like the periodic table prompt we already had recently. I don't love the wording of the 21 prompt, as my only tradition is legal drinking age... and drinking doesn't sound like a theme in a book I'm interested in seeking out. The REM song sounds depressing to me, and not a fan of song prompts in general.

A ton of genre prompts this round. I think I'd be fine with any of the genre prompts, but none are super unique or specific enough for me to vote for them.

I wish the physical disability prompt was just "disability" and didn't limit it to physical disabilities, but I won't down-vote that one.

I think I'll only upvote for the alliteration and pronoun in the titles.


message 41: by Nancy (last edited Aug 01, 2020 07:58AM) (new)

Nancy (fancynancyt) | 1067 comments Emily wrote: "For the children's award, what defines a child? Or an award for children's books? Would YA count, since they are not adults yet? (I'd probably definitely use this as a KIS option regardless since I..."

ALA has a list of children's book awards

And The Children’s & Teen Choice Book Awards has books chosen by kids and teens.

Here's another list with some overlap of the ALA list.

They include everything from picture books up to and including YA.

I do hope people can look beyond what they think a children's book is and vote for this prompt. As others have said they have come a long way since many of us were kids.


message 42: by Sara (new)

Sara (phantomswife) | 930 comments First time ever I only used two upvotes and downvoted six. Wasn't even crazy for the two I upvoted and a few I didn't feel one way or the other about. This selection of prompts just didn't do anything for me.


message 43: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (anastasiaharris) | 1333 comments I will be down voting a children's book. While I enjoyed reading those books when my children were young, I do not now.

The Google doodle sounds fun. I have learned more about history and other contemporary figures because of the doodles. It can be both fiction and non fiction with quite a few people to choose from.

The Nobel prize has been done too many times. I really do not reading dry books, or something above my understanding of a subject just to cross of a prompt.

I am not sure about the rest yet.


message 44: by Jillian (new)

Jillian | 1762 comments I ended up splitting my vote 4/4. I normally, don't change my votes based on the discussion but I ended up moving one prompt from not voting on it to an upvote.


message 45: by Nancy (new)

Nancy (fancynancyt) | 1067 comments Anastasia wrote: "I will be down voting a children's book. While I enjoyed reading those books when my children were young, I do not now."

I think that's fair, and a better reason than "why would I ever want to read a children's book for I am not a child."

I also agree with you on the Nobel prize prompt.


message 46: by Bree (new)

Bree (breemw) | 21 comments I don't have anything to say about the actual suggestions but I did want to add that I'm a huge fan of the design of the poll, the background is very bold and I love it!


message 47: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Sterling | 452 comments I love the children’s book suggestion! I wonder if many of the people who dislike this option are just thinking young children’s books, like picture books are early readers or even early chapter books. Which, those would absolutely be fine to read for this primly, especially if you need a break from some longer, heavier reads, but that’s just not all there is to it. Young adult books, which are considered “children’s books,” are so good. I mean, obviously there are plenty that are teen angst and deal with issues that middle school or teenage kids deal with, but there are some really amazing young adult books and authors out there these days. Options we did not have when I was a teen, but that I still enjoy reading now. Now, young adult is not my go-to genre, but I think a lot of people who think they dislike children’s books might discover some young adult books that they really enjoy. Just my opinion. 🤷‍♀️


message 48: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Luchetti | 738 comments Nancy wrote: "Anastasia wrote: "I will be down voting a children's book. While I enjoyed reading those books when my children were young, I do not now."

I think that's fair, and a better reason than "why would ..."



I don't think anyone has said that adults shouldn't read any children's books because they aren't children.

But your example of how children's books discuss important issues, seemed targeted as something adults could be interested in. While adults may be interested in them and I'm glad they are, I don't think that these important issues in children's books, like white privilege and police violence, should be used for adults to learn about these topics. If it was that simple to explain to adults, it wouldn't be an issue. This may not have been your intention, that was just how I construed it.

But I don't think anyone, at least that I have seen, is knocking the genre as a whole. We all have different opinions on every genre, and despite whether we agree or not, I think they are all valid. They are personal decisions and shouldn't be discussed as better or worse reasons just because we don't agree.


message 49: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (patchworkbunny) | 1796 comments Well I enjoy a few hours being entertained by something magical, or a few minutes reading a gorgeous picture book and appreciating the art, even though I am 38 and childless :)


message 50: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 2344 comments I read mostly children's and young adult books from 1994-2014 when I retired from being a school librarian. Then it took me a few years to want to read them again but I have started reading a few. I loved With the Fire on High this year.

I actually like that children's and YA aren't going to be as in depth as adult books on issues. Sometimes I just need to see things turning out okay.


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