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Conversations: books & readers > Picture books that children want to read over and over again

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message 1: by Samantha (new)

Samantha Ball | 9 comments I am interested to know which books people have found themselves reading over and over again to a child. These books have a special something about them, that keeps the child hooked. What do you think it is that keeps them interested ?


message 2: by LauraW (new)

LauraW (lauralynnwalsh) | 127 comments I would say that part of the appeal is multi-level interest. There is a simple message that is a basis for the initial appeal, but there is enough going on in the book other than the simple message, so that returning to the book a second and subsequent time deepens the message with extras.

For instance, my kids enjoyed a lot of Bill Peet's books. In this case, some of the "extra" was that my husband enjoyed the books and their messages. One of their favorites was Farewell to Shady Glade. Beside the simple message of leaving your home, there is the ecological message, the appeal of the animals and their lives, and the ties to our own family. My husband is a scientist working on climate change, who also happens to like trains. All of those things add depth to the book and invite multiple readings.


message 3: by Manybooks (last edited Jun 10, 2018 10:12AM) (new)

Manybooks | 8832 comments Mod
I know that I asked my mother to repeatedly read Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are, Eric Carle's The Very Hungry Caterpillar, and James Kruess' Henriette Bimmelbahn (all in German though). With Maurice Sendak, I loved Max's adventure and the unconditional love that after going on his adventure/time out, supper and home were waiting for him, with Eric Carle, mostly the illustrations and imagining a caterpillar consuming all this strange food and with James Kruess, his delightful poetry and onomatopoeic sounds.


message 4: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2275 comments My favorites were the classics Bread and Jam for Frances and the other Frances books, A Pocket for Corduroy, Curious George, Madeline, The Story of Babar, Catch Me & Kiss Me & Say It Again, The Tomten, Beatrix Potter, Robert McCloskey (of course, being a New Englander!), The Poky Little Puppy... I love animal stories and old-fashioned charm.

My older niece went straight for the pink shelf at the library. She loved Pinkalicious and Fancy Nancy, Angelina Ballerina and books about princesses. We read her Don't Kiss the Frog!: Princess Stories with Attitude at least twice. I liked the feminist take on fairy tales a lot and she just like the princesses.

Niece #2 was obsessed with Jan Brett for awhile. Something about the illustrations really appeals to her.
Niece #2 loved Pride & Prejudice : A BabyLit Counting Primer. I enjoyed introducing her to Jane Austen and she liked teaching her dolls how to count. I also like the Cozy Classics books by Jack Wang. The adult can add whatever they want to the story but the main point is the child is developing language. I read them all to my nieces when they were younger.

My family loves Watch Out for the Chicken Feet in Your Soup and the Strega Nona series because we can relate to the old world Italian grandma/great-grandma culture. Chicken Feet prompted niece #1 to learn how to bake bread dolls like the ones in the book.

The Magic School bus series has been popular as well. Niece 2 and nephew 1 watch the TV show while niece 1 and nephew 2 have been read the books. Niece #2 has a curious mind and the stories are informative and entertaining.


message 5: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6849 comments Mod
We loved the ones that were fun to read aloud, either because they had cool words that sounded fun, or they led to activities. Or both: We're Going on a Bear Hunt was memorized.


message 6: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2275 comments I will ask my mom this question. She taught nursery school (3-5 year olds).


message 7: by LauraW (new)

LauraW (lauralynnwalsh) | 127 comments As a sub, I used to carry Diary of a Wombat with me to read if I found an odd bit of time with nothing scheduled. I found that kids from Kindergarten through 6th grade all enjoyed the book, but for rather different reasons. The younger ones enjoyed it because wombats are adorable and the wombat does things that a naughty kid might also do. The older ones are able to understand the Amelia-Bedilia like jokes and plays on words.


message 8: by Samantha (new)

Samantha Ball | 9 comments It does seem to be that if the book has a repetitive nature then children love it. Just like We're Going on a Bear Hunt. Children do really enjoy being able to remember parts of the book and joining in when it is read to them. Attractive illustrations always help and bring the story to life. Has anybody come across a recently published children's story, that their children have wanted to repeatedly read?


message 9: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2275 comments Samantha wrote: "Has anybody come across a recently published children's story, that their children have wanted to repeatedly read?

This Book Just Ate My Dog! was a big hit when I brought it home from the library. My not so crazy about books nephew loved it and asked my dad to read it again. He also loved [book:Peanut Butter & Brains: A Zombie Culinary Tale. He had it read to him twice and then "read" it to his cousin, who happens to HATE scary things like zombies!


message 10: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8832 comments Mod
Although I only experienced Dr. Seuss after we had immigrated to Canada in 1976 when I was ten years old, I can well imagine that many of his books, such as for example Green Eggs and Ham would lend themselves very well and easily to being read repeatedly (a rhyming text and one that practices certain points of grammar in a fun way, yes indeed).


message 11: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6849 comments Mod
Samantha, I'm drawing a blank. I know lots of older books that had cumulative rhythms, or a chorus, or something else that would directly call for reader response. I'm not able to think of any newer books like that.

The closest I can come is something like Press Here. I read that over and over to *myself* and get a kick out of it every single time!

Now you've got me wondering...but I'll start another topic because it's more specific than this one.


message 12: by Samantha (new)

Samantha Ball | 9 comments Cheryl wrote: "Samantha, I'm drawing a blank. I know lots of older books that had cumulative rhythms, or a chorus, or something else that would directly call for reader response. I'm not able to think of any newe..."

Great idea Cheryl, it will be interesting to see which recently published books include this sort of rhythm


message 13: by Samantha (new)

Samantha Ball | 9 comments Manybooks wrote: "Although I only experienced Dr. Seuss after we had immigrated to Canada in 1976 when I was ten years old, I can well imagine that many of his books, such as for example [book:Green Eggs and Ham|237..."

Green Eggs and Ham is a favourite in our house! The amazing imagination of Dr. Seuss.


message 14: by Kim (new)

Kim Bogren Owen (wordsreflected) | 2 comments For young toddlers, many of the books, such as King Bidgoods in the Bathtub, Quick As A Cricket, and The Big Hungry Bear and the Red, Ripe Strawberry (Not sure I got that last one right), by Don and Audrey Wood's fit the bill. They, also, love Going on Bear Hunt, Goodnight Gorilla, and Grandfather Twilight. All those are musts for every child! I taught toddlers for years and those never got old. My son who is now a teen loved Saturday Night at the Dinosaur Stomp, as well as Dinosaurumpus and Harry and the Bucketful of Dinosaurs. I would also say that despite it being sad, the kids I taught loved Tough Boris and would frequently ask for it. Oh, and I forget There's A Nightmare in My Closet- that one was always a hit as well.


message 15: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8832 comments Mod
Samantha wrote: "Cheryl wrote: "Samantha, I'm drawing a blank. I know lots of older books that had cumulative rhythms, or a chorus, or something else that would directly call for reader response. I'm not able to th..."

And it really does teach grammar forms!!


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