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November 2016: Animals > Announcing the Tag for November

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message 1: by Anita (last edited Oct 23, 2016 09:51AM) (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6543 comments This month was pretty much a runaway for the tag that won. Even though many people wanted English literature, the people who voted for this tag backed up their vote with many participation points. The winner is:

animals

Please share your reading plans and recommendations below!

Remember, for the regular monthly reads, the book can be shelved as animals on Goodreads, or be a book that is not yet shelved that way but you feel should be.

To find books to read for this tag, please visit:

https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/...

Jen also found this helpful list as well:

https://www.buzzfeed.com/lincolnthomp...

Definitely looking forward to seeing what people recommend - - both fiction and non-fiction.


message 2: by Anita (last edited Oct 23, 2016 10:13AM) (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6543 comments For recommendations, I don't have much beyond the classic favorites:

Seabiscuit: An American Legend
Anything by James Herriot

or one of the many delightful children's classics (too many to list).

I'm considering:

A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons

or

Parasite Rex: Inside the Bizarre World of Nature's Most Dangerous Creatures

Does anyone have any other interesting non fiction selections? I love birds, and I think someone here recommended Life List: A Woman's Quest for the World's Most Amazing Birds? Is that enough about animals to count . . .


message 3: by Elise (new)

Elise (ellinou) | 525 comments I strongly recommend The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. The Call of the Wild by Jack London for fans of classic literature. Stephen King's Cujo is also a great one.

I'll be reading Good Dog. Stay. by Anna Quindlen. And I started The Origin of Species during the readathon, so if I finish in November it can count for this, even though it's also about plants, it was tagged as animals (it's also tagged as "books" though, so...)


message 4: by Jenni Elyse (new)

Jenni Elyse (jenni_elyse) | 1365 comments Hmmm. Animals. Here are my recommendations:

The Chronicles of Narnia
Charlotte's Web
The Very Hungry Caterpillar (ha ha)
The Books of Bayern
Maus
The Wolves of Mercy Falls
My Father's Dragon
His Dark Materials

I'm going to read The One and Only Ivan. I've been wanting to read that for a while.


message 5: by Sushicat (new)

Sushicat | 804 comments In non-fiction I would recommend:
Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior by Temple Grandin
and also:
Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer
Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food by Paul Greenberg
Rats: Observations on the History & Habitat of the City's Most Unwanted Inhabitants by Robert Sullivan

Parasite Rex: Inside the Bizarre World of Nature's Most Dangerous Creatures[Parasite Rex] by Carl Zimmer is also fascinating and well written - though I somehow did not associate it with animals...

For fiction I would also turn to James Herriot.
I have one of his on the shelf I have not yet read. Or I might give Never Cry Wolf by Farley Mowat a try. Watership Down by Richard Adams is another possible.


message 6: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8626 comments Anita wrote: "I love birds, and I think someone here recommended Life List: A Woman's Quest for the World's Most Amazing Birds? Is that enough about animals to count . . . ..."

I think I'd count it. I think I probably tagged it "animals" (and "birds"). There is much more to the story than the birds - the authors life, marriage, obsession, etc. But there is plenty on birds, as well.


message 7: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8626 comments Jenni Elyse wrote: "I'm going to read The One and Only Ivan. I've been wanting to read that for a while. ..."

Hope you like it! I really did!


message 8: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8626 comments Sushicat wrote: "Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior by Temple Grandin
and also:
Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer ..."


I second both of these. They are on my "favourites" list.


message 9: by LibraryCin (last edited Oct 23, 2016 12:05PM) (new)

LibraryCin | 8626 comments There are lots of animals books that have made my favourites lists over the years. They include:

My #1 recommendation:
Homer's Odyssey / Gwen Cooper

Others:
Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior / Temple Grandin
Eating Animals / Jonathan Safran Foer
(Both also recommended by Sushicat above and are nonfiction)

More nonfiction:
Amazing Gracie: A Dog's Tale / Dan Dye
Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World / Vicki Myron
Marley and Me: Life and Love With the World's Worst Dog / John Grogan
Alex & Me: How a Scientist and a Parrot Discovered a Hidden World of Animal Intelligence—and Formed a Deep Bond in the Process / Irene M. Pepperberg
Pot Plant Owl / Allan Eccles

Fiction:
Black Beauty / Anna Sewell
Memoirs of a Fighting Dog / Keisha Keenleyside
The Search / Nora Roberts
The White Bone / Barbara Gowdy (from the point of view of an elephant)


message 10: by Anita (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6543 comments Ellie wrote: "I strongly recommend The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. The Call of the Wild by Jack London for fans of classic literature. Stephen King's Cujo is..."

How is the Origin of Species? Is it difficult reading? I would like to try reading it one day . . .maybe that day is now, lol.


message 11: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8626 comments Wow! It appears I have about 90ish books on my tbr tagged "animals" (over at LT... there could be more on my physical shelf that isn't added on LT). Probably some I'll more lean toward:

Leaving Time / Jodi Picoult
The Bees / Laline Paull
The Elephant Whisperer / Lawrence Anthony
Love Saves the Day / Gwen Cooper
A Cat Named Squeeky / Vic Reskovic


message 13: by Red52 (new)

Red52 A current title out that looks very interesting. The Genius of Birds


message 14: by Amy (new)

Amy | 8854 comments I had planned in this event to go with Soul of an Octopus. But just thought of it. Does His Magesty's Dragon also qualify?


message 15: by Nicole R (new)

Nicole R (drnicoler) | 7782 comments Anita wrote: "How is the Origin of Species? Is it difficult reading? I would like to try reading it one day . . .maybe that day is now, lol. :..."

I have read Origin. And I am an ecologist who thinks Darwin may be the most brilliant man to have ever lived. And this book is so painful. It is incredibly long and dry and I am sure that if I were smarter I would be enraptured from cover to cover.

Honestly, there are probably more accessible books out there if you really want to learn about evolution and Darwin.


message 16: by Nicole R (new)

Nicole R (drnicoler) | 7782 comments Jen wrote: "I will read:
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History ..."


Fair warning to a fellow scientist: The structure and order of this book totally irked me. It was not in any kind of chronological order nor was it in order of relative size of extinction events. It had good information but I was lost as to who her audience was and ultimately only have it three stars.

I honestly just think I am not a huge fan of Kolbert. I did not rate her other books highly either and for the same structural and lack of clear audience reasons.


message 17: by Sushicat (new)

Sushicat | 804 comments LibraryCin wrote: ...
The Search is my favorite Nora Roberts.


message 18: by Nicole R (last edited Oct 23, 2016 12:40PM) (new)


message 19: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8626 comments Nicole R wrote: "Anita wrote: "How is the Origin of Species? Is it difficult reading? I would like to try reading it one day . . .maybe that day is now, lol. :..."

I have read Origin. And I am an ecologist who thi..."


It's one I've considered reading in the past, as well, but I think you've warned someone off it before (maybe me!), so I'm unlikely to try it, after all.


message 20: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8626 comments Nicole R wrote: "The Secret Lives of Bats: My Adventures with the World's Most Misunderstood Mammals..."

Oooh, I'll be really interested to know what you think of this one, if you get to it!


message 21: by Karin (last edited Oct 23, 2016 05:49PM) (new)

Karin | 7200 comments Anita wrote: "This month was pretty much a runaway for the tag that won. Even though many people wanted English literature, the people who voted for this tag backed up their vote with many participation points. ..."


Don't forget, and I tagged this animal (okay, I "shelved" it animal") when I read it this year. Carrying Albert Home: The Somewhat True Story of A Man, His Wife, and Her Alligator.


Some good lists. I was rather surprised, though, that the list from Jen did not include FARLEY MOWAT!!!!! Never Cry Wolf is a one of the greatest animal books of the 20th century and VERY important. If you like humour, he also wrote a memoir about a unique dog they had called The Dog Who Wouldn't Be. That said, some of the books listed on there are brilliant as well.

I also agree with both lists about All Creatures Great and Small and a few other ones.

I have NO idea what I'll read yet; I'm reading Seabicuit now, which is on both lists, but have to finish it no later than a week from today for this Olympics reading game. I've already read all of the Chet and Bernie books (Dog on It!, the first in the series, was on Jen's list, and while it's a fun mystery series, should have been replaced by a Farley Mowatt book IMO).


message 22: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 6012 comments I would recommend a recent read: Pax by Sara Pennypacker

Also good
Any of the James Herriott memoirs - just delightful
One Good Dog by Susan Wilson
The Chet & Bernie series by Spencer Quinn - Dog on It is the first one
The Elephant Whisperer by Lawrence Anthony

I think I will - finally - read Black Beauty by Anna Sewell. I don't know how I missed this as a child (especially during my "horse-crazy" phase), but better late than never.


message 23: by Amy (new)

Amy | 8854 comments I am adding to Soul of an Octopus, the Zookeepers Wife, which has been on my TBR. My mother loved it and recommended it to me. What a nice opportunity to read it.


message 24: by Anita (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6543 comments Nicole R wrote: "So many great non-fiction books to recommend!!!

I am going to recommend [book:Sex in the Sea: Our Intimate Connection with Sex-Changing Fish, Romantic Lobsters, Kinky Squid, and Other Salty Eroti..."


Ok, Sex in the Sea sounds very interesting . . .that might be the one. Definitely in contention!


message 25: by Anita (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6543 comments Jen wrote: "Yes!

My top recommendation is: The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness

Other recommendations:
The Year of the Hare
[book:W..."


Curious what you think of the Good, Good Pig. I wasn't thrilled with it which is why I'm not sure about The Soul of an Octopus even though I liked her writing style, and I feel like the octopus is an extremely interesting animal . . .hmmmm.


message 26: by Anita (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6543 comments Nicole R wrote: "Anita wrote: "How is the Origin of Species? Is it difficult reading? I would like to try reading it one day . . .maybe that day is now, lol. :..."

I have read Origin. And I am an ecologist who thi..."


Ok, that is certainly not going to work for this month. I have a number of reading commitments, and I'm looking for short and very engaging!


message 27: by Anita (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6543 comments Book Concierge wrote: "I would recommend a recent read: Pax by Sara Pennypacker

Also good
Any of the James Herriott memoirs - just delightful
One Good Dog by Susan Wilson
The Chet & Bernie..."



I was going to explicitly mention Black Beauty. Loved that one beyond measure, but not sure how it will hold up to an adult read.


message 28: by Anita (last edited Oct 23, 2016 02:51PM) (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6543 comments Rina1775 wrote: "A current title out that looks very interesting. The Genius of Birds"

Oooh, need to check this out - - I love birds! This month is looking a lot more exciting than I initially anticipated.

Usually, I'm pretty good at predicting the vote, but not this time! I was all set for English Literature.


message 29: by Susie (new)

Susie | 4488 comments Oh gosh. I have no recommendations that spring to mind!

I am going to read War Horse for the Fall Flurry as it is Melbourne Cup month in Melbourne and we are heavily in to the Spring Racing Carnival (which, incidentally, I have no interest in!). I think I'll give The Art of Racing in the Rain a go, and All Creatures Great and Small.


message 31: by Regina Lindsey (last edited Oct 23, 2016 02:59PM) (new)

Regina Lindsey | 1005 comments This is a difficult one for me. Guess my one recommendation is The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Possibilities:

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane
The Zookeeper's Wife

STAY AWAY FROM Beatrice and Virgil!


message 32: by Jgrace (last edited Oct 24, 2016 08:57AM) (new)

Jgrace | 2943 comments Anita wrote: "For recommendations, I don't have much beyond the classic favorites:

Seabiscuit: An American Legend
Anything by James Herriot

or one of the many delightful children's..."



I read Life List: A Woman's Quest for the World's Most Amazing Birds, Anita. It was a little dry, but I think you might find it interesting. It is less about the birds than about the birder and her obsessive quest; birding as an extreme sport.

I gave the animal tag to To The Bright Edge of the World and I think it is justifiable. The female protagonist is an early nature photographer and ornithologist.

Others that I can recommend:
Fiction
We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves
The Horse Whisperer
Watership Down
The Hound of the Baskervilles

Nonfiction:
A Three Dog Life
The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds with Common Birds
In the Shadow of Man or any other Goodall book.
Travels with Charley: In Search of America


message 33: by Amy (new)

Amy | 8854 comments What do people think about Edgar Sawtelle?


message 34: by Anita (new)

Anita Pomerantz | 6543 comments Jgrace wrote: "Anita wrote: "For recommendations, I don't have much beyond the classic favorites:

Seabiscuit: An American Legend
Anything by James Herriot

or one of the many delight..."


Thank you so much for your honest assessment of Life List: A Woman's Quest for the World's Most Amazing Birds. I am still interested, but I really don't need dry this month as I have more than the usual number of reading commitments, and my sons will be home part of the month. Very helpful info! I think I'm going to go with a book that is rated definitively 4 stars or higher . . .


message 35: by Susie (new)

Susie | 4488 comments To The Bright Edge of the World it is!

I also enjoyed We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves. It's all coming back to me now! Water For Elephants, which I'm sure you've all read, was worth reading too.


message 36: by Booknblues (new)

Booknblues | 6196 comments Regina wrote: "This is a difficult one for me. Guess my one recommendation is The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Possibilities:

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane
The Zo..."</i>

Regina, if you do read The Zookeepers Wife, you should also read [book:Irena's Children: The Extraordinary Story of the Woman Who Saved 2,500 Children from the Warsaw Ghetto
, as it is set in the same time and place and the zookeeper's wife, Antonina Zabinski, is mentioned in it.

You might also be interested in the one I'm planning on reading, The Perfect Horse: The Daring American Mission to Rescue the Priceless Stallions Kidnapped by the Nazis .

Amy, I liked Edgar Sawtelle when I read it, but it is kind of a love or hate book.



message 37: by Jenni Elyse (new)

Jenni Elyse (jenni_elyse) | 1365 comments LibraryCin wrote: "Jenni Elyse wrote: "I'm going to read The One and Only Ivan. I've been wanting to read that for a while. ..."

Hope you like it! I really did!"


I've heard it's so good. I'm sure I'll cry.


message 38: by Michael (new)

Michael (mike999) | 569 comments Nicole R wrote: "So many great non-fiction books to recommend!!! I am going to recommend [book:Sex in the Sea: Our Intimate Connection with Sex-Changing Fish, Romantic Lobsters, Kinky Squid, and Other Salty ..."

Such a wonderful list in terms of tantalizing fun and reward of likely learning something. I see your recent Octopus read was not worthy. I see if I skip that I have better critter parade books to try. I see them as standing on the shoulders of classics from Konrad Lorenz, Lewis Thomas, and Stephen Jay Gould. Fun and nutritious.


message 39: by Booknblues (new)

Booknblues | 6196 comments I'm excited by the tag of animals. It is one of my favorites.

I'm planning on reading The Perfect Horse: The Daring American Mission to Rescue the Priceless Stallions Kidnapped by the Nazis and hopefully Mercury as well.

As for recommendations, here we go:

The Lightkeepers -a suspense, but I loved it for its descriptions of the place and the animals.
There Are Cats in This Book - a children's book, short and sweet.
Elephant Destiny: Biography Of An Endangered Species In Africa - makes me sad.
Brazzaville Beach for anyone interested in chimps
An Indomitable Beast: The Remarkable Journey of the Jaguar so interesting
The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating - great memoir
Coal Black Horse historical fiction set in the Civil War.
Rewilding the World: Dispatches from the Conservation Revolution - nonfiction talks about establishing animal corridors and key species
The Joe Grey mysteries beginning with Cat on the Edge I adore this series
A Beautiful Truth it will tear your heart out
The Wisdom of Donkeys: Finding Tranquility in a Chaotic World - I wanted to go on a walk with a donkey after reading it.
Soul of a Lion: One Woman's Quest to Rescue Africa's Wildlife Refugees- set in Namibia
The Bear Went Over the Mountain just plain silliness
All the Pretty Horses if you want to read Cormac, I would start here
The Elephant's Journey
Red Dog
The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds with Common Birds get a hard copy for the illustrations.
The Great White Bear: A Natural and Unnatural History of the Polar Bear
The Tiger: A True Story of Vengeance and Survival about siberian tigers.

Okay, I really like animal books.


message 40: by Michael (last edited Oct 23, 2016 04:34PM) (new)

Michael (mike999) | 569 comments Top recommendation:
Watership Down--review

He really nailed the rabbits. Their rabbitiness comes through even with our human imagination invested in their quest for safe warrens.

Other recommendations:
Merle's Door: Lessons from a Freethinking Dog: Ted Kerasote--a loving 5-star biography of hunter dog in the Rockies, raised by Indians, rugged companion on ski touring, who became mayor and leader among dogs of a special town

Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend
: Susan Orlean--engaging tour of the original dog, his successors, and America's love affair with his heroic fictional and film incarnation

Winter World: The Ingenuity of Animal Survival :Bernd Heinrich--outstanding tour of the life stories of varied critters and plants as they prepare for and survive winter in the Maine woods

Providence of a Sparrow: Lessons from a Life Gone to the Birds: Chris Chester--a man takes in a fallen baby sparrow and the sparrow takes over his life in comic proportions

Our Inner Ape: A Leading Primatologist Explains Why We Are Who We Are: Frans de Waal--studies with the "make love not war" bonoboes find analogues of human empathy and social systems (and hypersexuality) quite different from fellow primates chimps and gorillas

A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons: Robert Saposky--a heart warming and enlightening account of a young student and the baboon troup he studied in Africa for many year

The Dog Who Wouldn't Be: Farley Mowat--autobiographical tale of a most outrageous dog from his childhood in Sascatchewan, full of comic tall tales

To read:
The Story of Edgar Sawtelle: David Wroblewski--I understand it has a great dog in it

Traveller: Richard Adams--a Civil War story told from the perspective of Robert E. Lee's horse


message 41: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1545 comments Anita wrote: "Curious what you think of the Good, Good Pig. I wasn't thrilled with it which is why I'm not sure about The Soul of an Octopus even though I liked her writing style, and I feel like the octopus is an extremely interesting animal . . .hmmmm.
"


So I really enjoyed Octopus but there were some things that annoyed me about it and I'm pretty sure those things are worse in the Pig book -- that's what I've heard. Specifically, I think she got very attached to the animals and this impacted her ability to be objective about them -- injecting personal feelings into her interpretation of what was going on.

That said, I thought The Soul of an Octopus was a really interesting book because octopuses are really fascinating and the book was well written. So overall it was a solid read for me.

I LOVE pigs so I've been wanting to read the book for a long time.


message 42: by Ladyslott (new)

Ladyslott | 1880 comments Amy wrote: "What do people think about Edgar Sawtelle?"

If you liked Hamlet, you might like this book. I hated it.


message 43: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 699 comments Recommendation:
For fiction there is We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves and another one, I haven't read yet but it is new this year, debut I think We Love You, Charlie Freeman.

Timbuktu, from the dog's POV

Satire with animals, Animal Farm

novel that seems like nonfiction; Tarka the Otter

Great fiction; Water for Elephants

I probably will read a children's book as I think I will need to read something that is short.


message 44: by Karin (last edited Oct 23, 2016 05:49PM) (new)

Karin | 7200 comments Michael wrote: "Top recommendation:
Watership Down--review

He really nailed the rabbits. Their rabbitiness comes through even with our human imagination invested in their quest for safe warrens.

Other recommenda..."


Hooray, another person mentioning Farley Mowat!


message 45: by Red52 (new)

Red52 Nicole R wrote: "Anita wrote: "How is the Origin of Species? Is it difficult reading? I would like to try reading it one day . . .maybe that day is now, lol. :..."

I have read Origin. And I am an ecologist who thi..."


Naw, Nicole I'm a biologist and I couldn't make it through that dry thesis either. important -yes. Readable- no. Life is too short to slog through that.


message 46: by Michael (last edited Oct 23, 2016 06:28PM) (new)

Michael (mike999) | 569 comments Booknblues wrote: "I'm excited by the tag of animals. It is one of my favorites...."

Wonderful list. And no overlaps with mine. I would second Brazzaville Beach. Red Dog, and Coal Black Horse. I'll trade you my reading the Wisdom of Donkeys of you try Providence of A Sparrow.


message 47: by Nicole R (new)

Nicole R (drnicoler) | 7782 comments Tina, that is so reassuring to hear! I agree that it is totally important but sweet mother it is dry.


message 48: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Pope (jenjunum) | 902 comments I think Beak of the Finch is *the* evolution book to read. It won a pulitzer. It my husband's favorite book.

Water for Elephants is a great choice. And then watch the movie.

I will recommend an author, Kate DiCamillo, she's a middle grade author, The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane was already recommended, but I think all/most of hers have animals, my daughter adored Kate and Ulysses, so maybe I'll read that. She haa probably read it a dozen times. It's about a girl with a superhero squirrel.


message 49: by Susie (new)

Susie | 4488 comments Superhero squirrel! That sounds great!! How old is your daughter Jen?


message 50: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8626 comments Book Concierge wrote: "I think I will - finally - read Black Beauty by Anna Sewell. I don't know how I missed this as a child (especially during my "horse-crazy" phase), but better late than never. ..."

I hope you love it. I did!


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