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What Else Are You Reading? > Childrens/ introduction to fantasy and Sci-fi recommendations

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message 1: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Hello sorry if this is not the right spot for this but I'm wondering if I could get a few childrens/introduction to fantasy and science fiction recommendations for a 7 year old. She's reading chapter books on her own like the Dear Dumb Diary,The Diary of a Wimpy Kid and the Rainbow Faries books. I've read out loud some like The Magic Theif and Inkheart. But I would like to find some that she can read herself. I have toyed with the idea of Harry Potter but I am not sure if the later books would really be suitable just yet. Thank you in advanced. Cross posted in one other group.


message 2: by John (Taloni) (last edited Aug 20, 2015 09:35PM) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3870 comments Hm. Madeleine L'Engle's books are good. Start with A Wrinkle In Time and if she likes that, the next two are worth reading. There are more after that but the quality declines greatly.

Chronicles of Narnia are all good, the entire seven book series is fine for kids. There are the movies too which you could watch together. If you offer her this series, be sure she starts with The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. Some collections start with The Magician's Nephew, but that one works better as a late series prequel that answers questions that naturally arise during a reading of the other books.

Of the Pern books, the Harper Hall trilogy is suitable - Dragonsong, Dragonsinger, White Dragon. The first trilogy - Dragonflight, Dragonquest and White Dragon are a little more adult.


message 3: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Thank you for the suggestions.


message 4: by Chris (new)

Chris | 7 comments Hi Carrie, after reading your request I though straight away about a recent book by Terry Pratchett called "Dragons of crumbling castle". It's a collection of short stories that he wrote for younger readers when he was a much younger man. I think it would be ideal and there's obviously plenty more Pratchett books to move on to.


message 5: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3870 comments ^That's right, Chris, your post reminded me of the Tiffany Aching books from Discworld. Those are YA. I haven't read them myself but they generally come well recommended and are intended for younger readers.


message 6: by Tobias (new)

Tobias Langhoff (tobiasvl) | 136 comments The good thing with Harry Potter is that she can grow up together with the books. By the time she gets to the later books, they would be suitable. Of course, this might have worked a little better back when I grew up with them and HAD to grow up while I waited for the next book to actually come out...


message 7: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Chris wrote: "Hi Carrie, after reading your request I though straight away about a recent book by Terry Pratchett called "Dragons of crumbling castle". It's a collection of short stories that he wrote for youn..."

Thank you, I'll be adding this to my list. It will be a good way to indroduce her to him.


message 8: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Tosh wrote: "My boys really enjoyed the Magic Tree House series by Mary Pope Osborne when they were younger. I'm not sure if the reading would be too simple for your daughter but they are geared towards 6-8 yea..."

I maade a request yesterday at the library for the first book in that series. I don't think they would be too simple. If the stories and adventures hold her attention it is a win.


message 9: by Carrie (last edited Aug 21, 2015 07:09AM) (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Tobias wrote: "The good thing with Harry Potter is that she can grow up together with the books. By the time she gets to the later books, they would be suitable. Of course, this might have worked a little better ..."

Haha I could every year on her birthday give her a copy of each book. Make her wait like we all had to but I probably would have to hide away my copies so she didnt sneak them.

But in all honesty I may hold off a year or two before I hand over her letter to Hogwarts.


message 10: by John (Nevets) (new)

John (Nevets) Nevets (nevets) | 1531 comments Daniel Pinkwater was a non traditional fantasy author I loved at that age. He is fantasy in the way the Lego movie is fantasy, but mostly his stories are about adventures, with extremely odd things happening, and a whole lot of humor as well.

I think when I was about 9 my family read through every book of his the local library had.


message 11: by Carrie (last edited Aug 21, 2015 07:08AM) (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Thank you John we have the Lego movie from the library and shes already seen before even checking it out. I will have to look into this author.


message 12: by Kristina (new)

Kristina | 588 comments My 7 year old has enjoyed Rise of the Earth Dragon and the other 3 in the series. I would suggest the Fablehaven series by Brandon Mull that you could read together.


message 13: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Thank you Kristina, they look like something she would enjoy.


message 14: by terpkristin (new)

terpkristin | 4120 comments Just kind of putting this out there, there's this novel feature of GR called "search" where you can *search* if this question has been asked before. Imagine a world where you could see what was said previously and instead of starting a new thread you could BUILD upon what was said before. You might have to refine your keyword or dig a bit, but if you truly want the answer, that shouldn't dissuade you unless you're just lazy.

Anyway, as proof, I offer:
Book series for an 11-year old: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...
A semi-active spinoff group called S&L Kids: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...
The above group was started by this thread: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...
Recommendations for a younger reader (oddly also an 11 year old target in the OP): https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...
Genre books for children & babies: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 15: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Terribly sorry if me asking for recommendations has put you out in way shape or form. There is no need to get snarky. I was merely asking for something that I hadn't noticed on first glance there being a topic for.

But I will thank you regardless, and make note if anyhing in your links are suitsble for a 7 year old.


message 16: by Tommy (new)

Tommy Hancock (tommyhancock) | 97 comments Carrie wrote: "Terribly sorry if me asking for recommendations has put you out in way shape or form. There is no need to get snarky. I was merely asking for something that I hadn't noticed on first glance there ..."

To be fair, I've known to search for things and about other groups/lists specifically targeted at certain ages/genres/etc., and while they're definitely worth a look, I often leave threads like this one(or post on recommendation/suggestion threads) to get a more personal response from people in the same groups as me. I personally don't mind it. Though, while maybe a be brash, terpkristin isn't wrong in pointing those things out. They're worthwhile, and, hey, now you got the links.


message 17: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments I didn't think she was wrong in doing so, I have pointed out things to others in the past myself on forms/boards, it was just the tone in which it was done that struck a nerve. I've looked a lists here on GR but just as you said it is nice to get a more personal response. Also to be perfectly honest I never even thought of seraching within the group page.


message 18: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3870 comments I'm good with discussion. This is a discussion board.


message 19: by Tommy (new)

Tommy Hancock (tommyhancock) | 97 comments Carrie wrote: "I didn't think she was wrong in doing so, I have pointed out things to others in the past myself on forms/boards, it was just the tone in which it was done that struck a nerve. I've looked a lists ..."

Well, whether it be here or those other links, best of luck finding what you're searching for. I saw someone mention Magic Tree House above. I personally haven't read it, but know a kid in the age group that absolutely loves them, so may be worth looking at.


message 20: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Thank you Tommy.


message 21: by Tassie Dave, S&L Historian (new)

Tassie Dave | 3497 comments Mod
Tobias wrote: "The good thing with Harry Potter is that she can grow up together with the books. By the time she gets to the later books, they would be suitable."

This is the approach I took with my god-daughter. I bought her "Philosopher's Stone" when she was about 8 and gave her the others as she got older. She was about 16 when she finished the series.


message 22: by Mike (new)

Mike | 9 comments For my 7th birthday I got an anthology of classic sf short stories, and I read two or three anthologies a year after that (mixed in with the usual Books aimed at that age group. Roddy the roadman, I think, mostly)

The good thing about short stories is you still get the short reading blocks that work well at this age, but if you are struggling with the story you can just skip it and try a different one, coming back to it when you're a little older. I think most short stories are simple enough to be enjoyable at this age, even if you aren't getting some of the deeper meanings.


message 23: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Thank you Mike, I'll keep an eye out for some.


message 24: by Karl (new)

Karl Smithe | 77 comments David and the Phoenix (1957) by Edward Ormondroyd
http://librivox.org/david-and-the-pho...
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/27922/...

The Wind in the Willows (1908) by Kenneth Grahame
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/289

Those are not really SF.

This was my first SF at 9:

Star Surgeon (1959) by Alan E. Nourse
http://manybooks.net/titles/noursea18...
http://librivox.org/star-surgeon-by-a...
http://www.sffaudio.com/?p=1299
http://www.amazon.com/Star-Surgeon-Al...


message 25: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Thank you Karl I'll check out those links later on today.


message 26: by Frank (new)

Frank (frank20145) | 8 comments I am reading The Dark Elf Trilogy to my 10yr old as a Bedtime story. He enjoys it.

The Fairyland Books by Catherine Valente are just awesome!


message 27: by ladymurmur (new)

ladymurmur | 148 comments Diane Wynne Jones - so many titles! I'd recommend Archer's Goon and The Dark Lord of Derkholm.

The Wizard of Oz, actually the entire series.

The Voyages of Doctor Doolittle.


message 28: by Tommy (new)

Tommy Hancock (tommyhancock) | 97 comments Oh, here's a good one Theodosia and the Serpents of Chaos (Theodosia Throckmorton, #1) by R.L. LaFevers

Strong/smart, young female lead, and it's based a lot on Egyptian mythology. There's 4 books total(I linked #1). I read it and really enjoyed it, though the first book does start a little slow. Still, worth looking into, I think.


message 29: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Frank wrote: "I am reading The Dark Elf Trilogy to my 10yr old as a Bedtime story. He enjoys it.

The Fairyland Books by Catherine Valente are just awesome!"


Impressive.


message 30: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments ladymurmur wrote: "Diane Wynne Jones - so many titles! I'd recommend Archer's Goon and The Dark Lord of Derkholm.

The Wizard of Oz, actually the entire series.

The Voy..."



Thank you. I own at least one Diane Wyne Jones book I believe.


message 31: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Tommy wrote: "Oh, here's a good one Theodosia and the Serpents of Chaos (Theodosia Throckmorton, #1) by R.L. LaFevers

Strong/smart, young female lead, and it's based a lot on Egyptian mythology. There's 4 books total(I linked #1). I read..."


Thank you I think she will definitely enjoy this series where it has a female protagonist.


message 32: by Gaines (last edited Aug 25, 2015 03:30PM) (new)

Gaines Post (gainespost) | 198 comments Almost anything by Ursula K. Le Guin is child- & young-adult-friendly. I loved The Earthsea Trilogy when I was around 13 or so (and re-read them fifteenish years later and loved them from a whole new perspective!).

Edit: Also, she writes both fantasy and sci-fi, which is nice :-)


message 33: by Ariel (new)

Ariel Stirling | 80 comments When I was that age I started reading the Lloyd Alexander books. I think Taran Wanderer was the first? Diana Wynne Jones has some great stuff, my favorite was Howl's Moving Castle. Narnia, obviously. And my daughter was crazy for the Warriors books by Erin Hunter, and Tamora Pierce's books also (Wild Magic was fun). Sadly, I didn't read much sci-fi back then.


message 34: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3870 comments ^My daughter also loved the Warriors books. Fair warning, though, lots of kitty deaths in them.


message 35: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Gaines wrote: "Almost anything by Ursula K. Le Guin is child- & young-adult-friendly. I loved The Earthsea Trilogy when I was around 13 or so (and re-read them fifteenish years lat..."

Thank you. I'll have to look into to her books, I remember seeing a handful of them at the library.


message 36: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Ariel wrote: "When I was that age I started reading the Lloyd Alexander books. I think Taran Wanderer was the first? Diana Wynne Jones has some great stuff, my favorite was Howl's Moving Castle. Narnia, obvio..."

Thank you for your suggestions, it is so nice to see that there is such a massive selection of childrens/younger audience fantasy and sci-fi.


message 37: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments John (Taloni) wrote: "^My daughter also loved the Warriors books. Fair warning, though, lots of kitty deaths in them."

Oh really? She loves cats, I wonder how she would handle it.


message 38: by Papaphilly (new)

Papaphilly | 171 comments Since your child is reading chapter books and you want SF&F, I suggest the Secrets of Droon Box Set and The Chronicles of Narnia. They fit the bill for chapter books and both fantasy and sci fi. My son loved both of them at that age.


message 39: by Scott (new)

Scott (dodger1379) | 124 comments John (Nevets) wrote: "Daniel Pinkwater was a non traditional fantasy author I loved at that age. He is fantasy in the way the Lego movie is fantasy, but mostly his stories are about adventures, with extr..."

My favorite author to this day - Pinkwater opened up whole new worlds for me (who else could explain the universe using a bagel and map of New Jersey). Odd, quirky fantasy - the best of the best.


message 40: by Eric (new)

Eric Mesa (djotaku) | 617 comments The Hobbit


message 41: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (veruna) | 8 comments You could try the Tamora Pierce books. She has multiple series set in two worlds that have young protagonists. I would probably start with the Circle of Magic set since the Songs of the Lionness deal with more mature themes in the laters books.


message 42: by John (Nevets) (new)

John (Nevets) Nevets (nevets) | 1531 comments Scott wrote: "My favorite author to this day - Pinkwater opened up whole new worlds for me (who else could explain the universe using a bagel and map of New Jersey). Odd, quirky fantasy - the best of the best.
"

Thanks Scott, I'm always surprised more people have not heard of him. Do you think my description is apt? It's been a long time since I did read any of his material. I should remedy that soon as well.


message 43: by Alan (new)

Alan | 534 comments (My boys are 14 and 11 so I've been through this pretty recently) There are a lot of great suggestions upthread. I'd say though that if she's just started reading chapter books, that you should vet Narnia, Pern, Wrinkle in Time, Harry Potter and the Hobbit first to see if they're too slow/long for her. Their subject matter is perfectly fine but the writing style may be more for next year.

The suggestions of Secrets of Droon and Magic Tree House are probably right in the wheel house and may well be too easy in another couple years. To those, I'd add the Dragonslayers Academy and Origami Yoda.

If Droon and the like are too easy, I'd add Another Fine Myth by Robert Lynn Asprin and Space Cadet by Robert Heinlein.

But it's amazing how many YA fantasy series there are now - my kids loved tons of books that I've never read ...


message 44: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments Thank you all for your wonderful suggestions. I will be adding them to my list.

She told me the other that sometime durning this school year she would like to try The Hobbit. So far she hasnt read overly lengthy chapter books.


message 45: by Alan (new)

Alan | 534 comments I forgot to mention How to Train Your Dragon. Both it and Origami Yoda are very reminiscent of Diary of a Wimpy Kid in the style of how the book looks and is constructed.


message 46: by Carrie (new)

Carrie  (icanhasbooks) | 66 comments I don't believe I have heard of the Oigami Yoda books.


message 47: by Martin (new)

Martin Schuh | 3 comments When I was about 8, I read the first book that I simply could not put down. It was 'The Letter for the King' from Dutch author Tonke Dragt (I had to check, whether it was translated, I read it in German). I read till I had finished the book by two in the morning. But if remember correctly it wasn't really fantasy, more of a knight's book, because there was nothing supernatural in it. Still like that and the sequel 'The Secrets of the Wild Wood' very much.


message 48: by David (new)

David (dbigwood) Dealing with Dragons and the other books in the series The Enchanted Forest Chronicles by Patricia C. Wrede are worth considering. They are decent enough that if you are reading them at bedtime to a child you won't dread the experience.


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