Fans of Interracial Romance discussion

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message 1: by Wanda (new)

Wanda | 5 comments How important is it to you to have the interracial component be a part of the plot? Personally I'm fine with it having no significance, except it being a representation of myself as a BW.


message 2: by AKA (new)

AKA (mskingspens) | 689 comments For me, if the book isn't historical (VB's Colorblind or SJF's Being Plumville are examples of good ones), I really don't want to read a book where race is part of the storyline. I want to read about mature people in adult relationships, so race should matter about as much as gender, lol. Black women are apparently from Venus, too.


message 3: by Kim (new)

Kim (kimgm) | 1032 comments It depends on the story. If the interracial component is handled well and doesn't feel preachy, then I am all for it. It doesn't have to be a huge part of the story line.


The FountainPenDiva, Old school geek chick and lover of teddy bears (thefountainpendiva) | 1211 comments If we're talking historical, it depends upon the time period. The ancient world was less about race and more about culture. For example the Egyptians. One was either Egyptian or one was not. When they went to war/conquered other nations it had to do with security and/or expanding their empire. The same with the Romans. If you weren't a Roman citizen, you were a barbarian and it didn't matter what you looked like. Racializing people (and mistreating them accordingly) is a fairly recent concept in historical terms. Not to say the ancient world was some racial utopia, but it didn't factor in as much. At least from all the history I've studied over the years.

As far as contemporary IR is concerned. Race is a no-no. It's lazy writing first of all, and it's predictable. Grown ups shouldn't give a damn about other folks' ignorance. The biggest problem is that it's sometimes written so heavy-handed and of course skewed against the black heroine. She's the one with the issue. That bothers me. Wouldn't it be interesting for the hero to have the issue and yet want the heroine in spite of himself? Maybe an ex-skinhead trying to redeem himself?


message 5: by Danielle The Book Huntress (Winter Frost Queen) , Sees Love in All Colors (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress (Winter Frost Queen)  (gatadelafuente) | 7314 comments Mod
I don't think it should be an obstacle to the couple. It might be disingenuous for there to be no background friction about race, depending on the setting. I prefer that it not be a major part of the story though.


message 6: by AKA (last edited Nov 27, 2013 07:48PM) (new)

AKA (mskingspens) | 689 comments TheFountainPenDiva wrote: "If we're talking historical, it depends upon the time period. The ancient world was less about race and more about culture. For example the Egyptians. One was either Egyptian or one was not. When t..."

I wish more authors had my obsession with history because I would be all over some BC/IR. The two I used as examples were set in pre civil war & 1960's Dixie Six so it wouldn't have made sense if race wasn't a huge factor. I was skeptical about both but they were excellent and managed to have conflict within the relationships that had nothing to do with race.

I am to the point where I try to look for hints of what I call BBHW aka "but... but he's white" in the previews of any IR or MC I read. I want to rationalize and say that the male leads rarely ever have issues because there is no privilege like WM privilege. The cynic in me says the authors are just feeding into the stereotype that BW are more concerned with melanin than happiness.


message 7: by Connie (new)

Connie | 761 comments Paganalexandria **wicked juices bubbling over** wrote: "For me it all depends on how it's handled and the emphasis. Maybe I'm in the minority, but even though I am open to dating interracial in the beginning of the relationship some thought is always g..."

I'm with you Pagan. I don't mind if race is discussed or even acknowledged because I always think of what is the motivation myself. My curiosity is not due to ever having an awkward situation or anything, but because I'm just fascinated as to the why. How is that conflict, if there is one, going to be solved? How do the characters evolve? I feel that it should be done in a tasteful manner that is not always filled with open, hostile confrontation. Many authors try to explore this, but the way that it is handled, is usually poorly executed which has made it an automatic turnoff for many to read a book like that. If an author would take the time to flesh out those scenes and not just make it a 1 or 2 page scene, I don't think there would be as much animosity towards that kind of writing, but since most don't it's probably best to not go down that alley if it's not going to be done well.


Paganalexandria  | 4037 comments Connie wrote: "Paganalexandria **wicked juices bubbling over** wrote: "For me it all depends on how it's handled and the emphasis. Maybe I'm in the minority, but even though I am open to dating interracial in th..."

Happy Turkey day Connie!

Now I don't mind it just being a random thought that goes through a characters mind. Especially if it's a established that the hero is a player. It only makes sense to question all the possible motives.


message 9: by Connie (new)

Connie | 761 comments Paganalexandria **wicked juices bubbling over** wrote: "Connie wrote: "Paganalexandria **wicked juices bubbling over** wrote: "For me it all depends on how it's handled and the emphasis. Maybe I'm in the minority, but even though I am open to dating in..."

Thanks Pagan! Happy Thanksgiving to you as well and everyone else reading this thread today! :)


message 10: by Indigo.plume (new)

Indigo.plume | 105 comments I think it depends on whether the book is character driven or plot driven. If it is character driven, the race component should be explored. Yes, race is a purely social construct, but it is something that each person knows the value of from a very young age. How one identifies, racially, has an impact on one's personality and can often be an integral aspect in characterization in a fiction novel.

One the other hand, if the book is plot driven the racial component can get tricky. I'd rather not read a story where the hero and heroine are thrown into random racially uncomfortable situations. This comes off as manufactured drama, and it is a disingenuous plot device (at best).


message 11: by Arch , Mod (new)

Arch  | 6570 comments Mod
I like books where you find out the hero and heroines race and that is where the race topic stops. I do not like reading stories where race is an issue. Everyone is not against interracial relationship. When I write my stories I focus on the story and not race. My characters are not their race.


Paganalexandria  | 4037 comments Arch wrote: "I like books where you find out the hero and heroines race and that is where the race topic stops. I do not like reading stories where race is an issue. Everyone is not against interracial relation..."

I don't want a story where it's made into the main plot point, but do like when it's mentioned and sometimes vibes on. I would really love an IR Wallbanger (Cocktail, #1) by Alice Clayton or Seduction and Snacks (Chocolate Lovers, #1) by Tara Sivec because in real life the differences aren't always a source of angst or drama. Sometimes those little cultural differences provide the laugh track of my life. One of my friends is always suggesting adventures and our running joke is me giving her a look, rubbing my hand, while saying, "uhm, hello, black girl..." as my reasoning for not being into it. Usually we end up doing it anyway because it's good to go outside your comfort zone. I think those kind of in jokes or casual banter only happen when true intimacy forms. When I read these books of these supposed great loves, it feels odd when even the obvious differences aren't ever spoken of causally or teased about. It's completely unrealistic.


message 13: by Mstcat (new)

Mstcat | 1260 comments Paganalexandria **wicked juices bubbling over** wrote: "Arch wrote: "I like books where you find out the hero and heroines race and that is where the race topic stops. I do not like reading stories where race is an issue. Everyone is not against interr..."

I agree with this.


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