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Archive - General > Films based on books - I kindly request recommendations

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message 1: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments I like watching a film based on the book I've read.

How the characters imagined in the book are portrayed in film, giving me an understanding of the story line, plot, sub plots etc...

Would you share what film you enjoyed after reading the book (or vice versa).

I will appreciate your recommendations.

Many thanks,
Joanne.


message 2: by Terri (new)

Terri (terrilovescrows) | 28 comments The Green Mile would be one I really enjoyed


message 3: by Dipanjan (new)

Dipanjan | 50 comments My first choice will be "The Godfather". I would highly recommend reading the book and then watching the movie for an Absolutely Fantastic experience!


message 4: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Dipanjan wrote: "My first choice will be "The Godfather". I would highly recommend reading the book and then watching the movie for an Absolutely Fantastic experience!"

Hey I will you know I was going to buy the trilogy then changed my mind. thank you.


message 5: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Terri wrote: "The Green Mile would be one I really enjoyed"

Oh yes, thank you Terri I didn't know about the book. I'm in the know already !


message 6: by Val (new)

Val (valz) | 56 comments If you liked Gone Girl and I did, the movie has been cast. After all the rumors that I heard of who was playing Amy, I am pleased. Ben Afflect gets to be Nick AND Batman. Zow!! Bam! Splat! (old Batman language).


http://litreactor.com/news/tyler-perr...


http://litreactor.com/news/tyler-perr...


message 7: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (finegael) | 690 comments Sometimes the movies is changes from the book. Catch-22 is a good example. The book is a classic, the movie, well, a bit dated, but it probably should be in your bucket list.


message 8: by Poornima (new)

Poornima | 1 comments Most of the Harry Potter movies were good. However, i liked the initial movies compared to the later ones...did not like the final three movies that much.

The movie "My fair lady" based on George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion" was a lovely movie.. though they changed the ending in tje movie.


message 9: by Malina (new)

Malina | 1844 comments I would recommend
Shutter island
Life of Pi
Mystic River
I think all were very well adapted


message 10: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Malina wrote: "I would recommend
Shutter island
Life of Pi
Mystic River
I think all were very well adapted"


Thank you Malina I 've just started reading Dennis Lehane & have those films in my collection so ones to look forward too.


message 11: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Poornima wrote: "Most of the Harry Potter movies were good. However, i liked the initial movies compared to the later ones...did not like the final three movies that much.

The movie "My fair lady" based on George ..."


Thanks, you know I've never read or watched any Harry Potter so they are high up on my list.


message 12: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Jennifer wrote: "Sometimes the movies is changes from the book. Catch-22 is a good example. The book is a classic, the movie, well, a bit dated, but it probably should be in your bucket list."

Hi Jennnifer, thanks for recommendation.


message 13: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Val wrote: "If you liked Gone Girl and I did, the movie has been cast. After all the rumors that I heard of who was playing Amy, I am pleased. Ben Afflect gets to be Nick AND Batman. Zow!! Bam! Splat! (old Bat..."

Hi Val, Gone Girl I've read 50/50 only I would watch the movie, watched Side Effects last week enjoyed it great twists & turns ...


Laura/Mystery in Minutes  | 57 comments Malina wrote: "I would recommend
Shutter island
Life of Pi
Mystic River
I think all were very well adapted"


I haven't read Life of Pi, so, even though I liked the film version, I can't speak to how well it was adapted. I have read Mystic River and Shutter Island, and while I thought both were good movies, I preferred the film adaptation of Shutter Island, directed by Martin Scorsese.


Laura/Mystery in Minutes  | 57 comments This is an older classic of American fiction, but both the book and the film adaptation of To Kill A Mockingbird were outstanding!


message 16: by Dipanjan (new)

Dipanjan | 50 comments Val wrote: "Ben Afflect gets to be Nick AND Batman. Zow!! Bam! Splat! (old Bat..."

I hope they make Benny Boy wear the silk costume with the satin underwear on top. Must match the costume to the voice!!


message 17: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Kim wrote: "I usually like the book better, but here are a few book to movie adaptations that are pretty well done:

Pride and Prejudice
Sense and Sensibility
The Davinci Code
All the Harry Potter Books
To Kil..."


Thanks Kim


message 18: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Laura G. wrote: "This is an older classic of American fiction, but both the book and the film adaptation of To Kill A Mockingbird were outstanding!"

Thanks Laura


message 19: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Laura G. wrote: "Malina wrote: "I would recommend
Shutter island
Life of Pi
Mystic River
I think all were very well adapted"

I haven't read Life of Pi, so, even though I liked the film version, I can't speak to h..."


I'm reading Mystic River soon & then watching the film


message 20: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments I'm starting Mystic River today looking forward to reading having just discovered Dennis Lehane last month. I read Live by night soon to be released into a film.


message 21: by Daniel (new)

Daniel (diaze) | 267 comments The Big Sleep was done very well. Both book and film are classics.


message 22: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Daniel wrote: "The Big Sleep was done very well. Both book and film are classics."

Thank you Daniel, straight to read list hadn't known of Raymond Chandler.


message 23: by Rumm (new)

Rumm | 2 comments I guess there are so many that it is difficult to select. The mysteries I enjoyed the most are Hercule Poirot movies where David Suchet plays Poirot. Other recommendable ones (TV serials though) are Sherlock Holmes and Perry Mason.

I am not sure if you have read Alistair MacLean's books. Most of them have been made into movies and are quite faithful to the books. Guns of Navarone (Gregory Peck), Where Eagles Dare (Clint Eastwood et al) and Breakheart Pass (Charles Bronson) come to mind.


message 24: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Rumm wrote: "I guess there are so many that it is difficult to select. The mysteries I enjoyed the most are Hercule Poirot movies where David Suchet plays Poirot. Other recommendable ones (TV serials though) ar..."

Thanks Rumm I haven't he's appearing an action adventure author to me my favourite tv series is 'Lost' watching again for the fifth time ...


message 25: by Rumm (new)

Rumm | 2 comments Yeah. I guess Maclean is adventure. Sorry!


message 26: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Rumm wrote: "Yeah. I guess Maclean is adventure. Sorry!"

Hey thanks for posting a books a book a films a film whatever the genre .


message 27: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Thank you for 'No Country for Old Men', Cormac McCarthy my next book ... recently watched film 'Side Effects' recommended by a Goodreads friend & really enjoyed . . .


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Joanne,
After Mystic River try Any Given Day and Live by Night by Dennis Lehane.

Richard Brawer
www.silklegacy.com


message 29: by Joanne (new)

Joanne | 54 comments Thanks Richard, I was going for 'Shutter Island' will switch to 'Any Given Day' the later was the first Lehane book I read now waiting for the film.


message 30: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Blackwell | 1 comments I love the Percy Jackson books, especially the Sea of Monsters and its been turned into a movie. It mostly stuck with keeping a lot of what's in the book in the movie story line. Over all it was a good movie but I really want to see the Lost Hero/ Son of Neptune in a movie. I think they'd be great movies.


message 31: by Cindy (new)

Cindy Morgan | 34 comments The Help
On The Beach
Grapes of Wrath


message 32: by Ron (new)

Ron (ronb626) | 3735 comments Most of the time, I prefer to see the movie 1st, then, read the book.

This is because, to me, the movie isn't a very good representation of the book. So, if I like the movie, I'll probably really like the book.

If I do it the other way around, I wind up disappointed in the movie and just don't enjoy it.

The movie is usually not nearly as good as the book it was taken from. Probably a few exceptions, but, by and large, I find that to be true.

So, by viewing the movie 1st, and then, reading the book, I usually wind up enjoying both. But, reading the book 1st usually means I'm disappointed in the movie. Seldom does the movie make the book disappointing. The same just cannot be said for the reverse.

Your mileage may differ...


message 33: by Foul97 (new)

Foul97 | 21 comments Lonesome Dove


message 34: by Ron (new)

Ron (ronb626) | 3735 comments Jamie Lynn wrote: "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone and To Kill a Mockingbird were both very close to the books when they became movies."

Don't know about the Harry Potter one, but, you're right on To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. I enjoyed both versions, film and book.

I 1st saw the movie when it came out in 1962. But, years later, just a couple of years ago, I discovered that my local library had copies of both the book and the DVD. I got the DVD 1st and then read the book. Both were very good. And, yes, this is one film that stayed very close to the book.

So many films drift far from the book. Sometimes, it seems like it's another story.

And, as Foul97 pointed out, Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry is another one. Very close to the book.

But, as we can see, we have to point out the movies that are close. To list the ones that just don't do justice to the book would be a ponderous list, indeed.


message 35: by Kgwhitehurst (new)

Kgwhitehurst | 45 comments THE MALTESE FALCON by Dashiell Hammett and the film with Humphrey Bogart, directed by John Ford. Very close to each other. In fact, Ford eliminated only one character and one scene (if I recall correctly) from the book.

Another would be EAST OF EDEN. The 1980s series with Jane Seymour and Timothy Bottoms was a much better adaptation than the movie one done in the 50s with James Dean.


message 36: by Weenie (new)

Weenie | 17 comments If you want to try out graphic novels, then the movie 'Watchmen' was closely based on the book Watchmen.


message 37: by Feliks (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) Kgwhitehurst wrote: "THE MALTESE FALCON by Dashiell Hammett and the film with Humphrey Bogart, directed by John Ford. Very close to each other. In fact, Ford eliminated only one character and one scene (if I recall cor..."

John Ford didn't direct 'Maltese Falcon'. You're thinking of John Huston.


message 38: by Feliks (last edited Oct 17, 2015 05:48AM) (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) A list of movies adapted from books..sheesh I know I ran through this once--must be in another group in another thread somewhere. I need to store it locally so I can refer to it again instead of doing this from scratch each time.

Anyway, here goes. What I can recall anyway.

The Hot Rock
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3
The Day of the Jackal
The Sea Wolf
The Dirty Dozen
The French Connection
Dog Day Afternoon
The Godfather
Black Sunday
The Loved One
The Maltese Falcon
Murder, My Sweet
Hud
Harper
Marathon Man
Peeper
The Ipcress File
The Billion Dollar Brain
Funeral in Berlin
Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (BBC)
Smiley's People (BBC)
Brideshead Revisited (BBC)
Far from the Madding Crowd
The Eagle Has Landed
Requiem for a Heavyeight
Guns of Navarone
Where Eagles Dare
Ice Station Zebra
The Swimmer
Das Boot
The Killers
The Andromeda Strain
The Sand Pebbles
Don't Look Now
Rosemary's Baby
The Boys from Brazil
The Manchurian Candidate
Three Days of the Condor
The Eye of the Needle
Fail Safe
Journey into Fear
A Coffin for Dimitrios
Report to the Commissioner
The Last Detail
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
From Here to Eternity
The Day of the Locust
The Long Goodbye
The Parallax View
This Gun for Hire
Our Man in Havana
Bridge on the River Kwai
The Heiress
Invasion of the Body Snatchers
Cape Fear



message 39: by Janet (new)

Janet Stokes | 485 comments Do TV series count?

To the movies list I add:
- Jack Reacher (from Lee Child's books)
- The Lincoln Lawyer (from Michael Connelly's books)
- Before I Go to Sleep


message 40: by Kgwhitehurst (last edited Oct 19, 2015 06:17AM) (new)

Kgwhitehurst | 45 comments Feliks wrote: "Kgwhitehurst wrote: "THE MALTESE FALCON by Dashiell Hammett and the film with Humphrey Bogart, directed by John Ford. Very close to each other. In fact, Ford eliminated only one character and one s..."

You're right. Sorry, I had a bit of brain fart on that because I know it was Huston. But the rest is accurate. One scene, one character removed. Furthermore, Hammett wrote it with an eye to making a movie of it. Weirdly, there are two versions prior to the Huston film, both of which were financial failures, probably because they didn't stick to the novel. And so it goes.


message 41: by Kgwhitehurst (last edited Oct 19, 2015 06:29AM) (new)

Kgwhitehurst | 45 comments Many of les films noirs were adapted from novels. Below is a partial list--

LAURA
THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER
OUT OF THE PAST (novel is BUILD MY GALLOWS HIGH)
LA BÊTE HUMAINE (Zola's novel's a mess, but Jean Renoir's film is great.)
THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY (American adaptation was made with Matt Damon and Jude Law; the French adaptation, LE PLEIN SOLEIL/PURPLE NOON, stars Alain Delon.)
BRIGHTON ROCK
NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EYES
SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER
DOUBLE INDEMNITY
THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE
STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (another Highsmith, this one directed by Alfred Hitchcock)

Short stories--
THE KILLERS (from Hemingway's Nick Adams story of the same name)


message 42: by Kgwhitehurst (new)

Kgwhitehurst | 45 comments Not a noir, but another Hemingway adaptation--THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO.


message 43: by J. (new)

J. (jeeann_g) | 1 comments Darren Shan (Cirque du Freak) series by Darren Shan - loved the books; the movie was OK, but didn't have the same mood and some plots of the books.

Big Fish by Daniel Wallace - movie was awesome; so touching; fairy tale-like approach to life and its adventures


message 44: by Feliks (last edited Oct 19, 2015 08:23AM) (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) Kgwhitehurst wrote: "You're right. Sorry, I had a bit of brain fart on that because I know it was Huston. But the rest is accurate. One scene, one character removed. Furthermore, Hammett wrote it with an eye to making a movie of it. Weirdly, there are two versions prior to the Huston film, both of which were financial failures, probably because they didn't stick to the novel. And so it goes. ..."

Agreed. I know it was just a mental hiccup from the content of the rest of your remarks.

The scene you're thinking of is--as I recall--the one where one of the women is exiting Spade's office rearranging her clothes as the case is about to begin. Something like that.

But I think there were more than just two prior versions. I've seen the Richard Cortez version in '31(?). It was interesting (more leeway since it was pre-code) but pallid in comparison to '41. Different elements were emphasized and others, effaced. Cortez played Spade as a leering wolf.

John Huston (son of famed father Walter) came up through the system the traditional way, worked hard, honed his eye, and simply had superb story-sense. The flicks he worked on as writer before he got 'Falcon' were also sharply done.


message 45: by Kgwhitehurst (last edited Oct 19, 2015 10:15AM) (new)

Kgwhitehurst | 45 comments The character I'm thinking of Gutman's daughter and the scene is where Spade rescues her. She didn't add anything to the story, so Huston cut her. I've read the book twice, and seen the movie several times.

John Huston knew his business. He had a cameo in TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE, for which I believe Walter won an Oscar. There's a book for this one, too. Richard Travers, I think, is the author.

I'm sure it's two prior versions. The Richard Cortez MF was done in 1931. In 1936, Hollyweird filmed SATAN MET A LADY--from the line about Sam Spade looking like a blond Satan. Bette Davis was in it; she hated it.

There are parodies made of the MF after Bogart version, and even a comedy involving George Seagal as Sam Spade, Jr. I think we can pass on those efforts.

THE MALTESE FALCON is a great novel, but THE GLASS KEY is better. I can't say anything about the movie of that novel, because I haven't seen it, but the novel is fantastic. THE DAIN CURSE is also good. Was there an adaptation of that?


message 46: by Peggy (new)

Peggy Rothschild | -84 comments Really love the recommendations on this thread. A newer movie to include is the adaptation of Michael Connelly's THE LINCOLN LAWYER. I thought they did a great job capturing the character of Mickey Haller and keeping the plot taut.


message 47: by Amy (new)

Amy (thenikitagirl) | 791 comments I haven't read that book or have seen the movie. I will add the book to my ever growing list. Thanks, Peggy!


message 48: by Feliks (last edited Oct 20, 2015 08:08PM) (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) I find 'Glass Key' lackluster in both book and movie.

'Dain Curse' was adapted into a PBS/American Masters/American Playhouse miniseries starring Lee Marvin. Good job by Marvin but the material is simply too lurid to be credible. I'll take Frederic Forrest in Wim Wenders' "Hammett" any day.

The Ricado Cortez version of Falcon had two titles/two releases, that's probably what I'm mindful of.

John Huston appears in several scenes in 'Treasure' so its better to say he was a character rather than just a cameo. Of course, he went on to do a good many roles in addition to directing.

I don't care what Bette Davis thinks about anything. Can't stand her. Respect her skills; "One-take Davis" but what a cold fish.

The George Segal comedy 'Black Bird' is actually kind of hilarious. Nothing wrong with it. Segal is good in just about anything. Couple of great sight-gags in that flick.

I don't recall any daughter of Caspar Gutman in any book I've read. That's a new one on me.


message 49: by Janet (new)

Janet Stokes | 485 comments Kgwhitehurst wrote: "Many of les films noirs were adapted from novels. Below is a partial list--

LAURA
THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER
OUT OF THE PAST (novel is BUILD MY GALLOWS HIGH)
LA BÊTE HUMAINE (Zola's novel's a mess, b..."


LOVE this list. I've got to rent BRIGHTON ROCKS.

Live Felik;'s recommendations too. This thread should be a great reference thread to come back t for books and movies because the best of the books usually get made into movies.


message 50: by Kgwhitehurst (new)

Kgwhitehurst | 45 comments Be sure to rent the 1947 BRIGHTON ROCK. That's the one with Dickie Attenborough. His Pinkie is a stone-cold sociopath. There is a new remake which I have not seen; the 1947 adaptation hews well to the book.

"3:10 to Yuma" is a short story by Elmore Leonard that was adapted with the most beautiful cinematography in 1957. Movie starred Glenn Ford and Van Heflin. There is a more modern remake with Christian Bale and Russell Crowe. I hated it.


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