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Specific Books & Authors > Which Narnia Book Should Be Read First?

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message 1: by ABC (new)

ABC (mary6543) | 341 comments In your opinion, which Narnia book should be read first?

The Magician's Nephew
or
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

And if it is the latter, when should "The Magician's Nephew" be read? (I can't remember.)


message 2: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7022 comments Mod
Kirei wrote: "In your opinion, which Narnia book should be read first?

The Magician's Nephew
or
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

And if it is the latter, when should "The Magician's Nephew" be read? (I c..."


I think that this is basically one of "personal choice" but I would read The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe first.


message 3: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Vegan (lisavegan) | 1077 comments Personally, I'm very grateful I read The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe first. I still think it belongs first. But, I can understand other readers choosing differently.


message 4: by Nicola (last edited Sep 14, 2012 08:13AM) (new)

Nicola (technicola) I always read The Magician's Nephew first because the set I had were numbered in chronological order. I never knew there was a different order.

I'm re-reading them now and doing it in published order (so The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe first. In this order Magician's Nephew is second last, before The Last Battle.

It's personnal choice really.


message 5: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
I agree with Nicola & others. Either way is ok, but I prefer to read them in the order the author intended them to be read (as best we can tell, by using publication date.)


message 6: by ABC (new)

ABC (mary6543) | 341 comments Thanks, everyone! I think I will do the "Lion, Witch, and the Wardrobe" first, my main reason being that "The Magician's Nephew" is my favorite in the series and I would rather work up to it than work down from it.


message 7: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Partin (christopherpartin11) Personally I think it depends on whether you've read the books or not. It is, of course, personal choice, but I think if one hasn't read the books yet then one should read The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe first. If you have read them, then whatever you prefer.

A lot of people prefer to read them in chronological order after they've read the series.


message 8: by Claire (new)

Claire Caterer | 24 comments When I was a kid, I read the books in the order published, which of course places Wardrobe first. The box set I had placed them in the published order, so that made sense to me (I think it even numbered them). I agree with BunWat; Wardrobe sets up the series. Then you have the delicious fun of discovering a prequel when you get to Nephew. Part of why I love that sequence is that I get to crawl inside Lewis's mind as he wrote them, one after the other. But the other reason is that it was a huge part of my childhood, so it just feels right. A huge bias. But they're great in any order!


message 9: by Dena (new)

Dena McMurdie (batchofbooks) | 18 comments I would read The Lion The Witch and The Wardrobe first. It was published first, so I've always read it first.


message 10: by Jessika (new)

Jessika (jessalittlenerdy) I read The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe first, but that was because I read it for school and that was my first exposure to the series. I think you could really read either one first, it's personal preference.


message 11: by ABC (new)

ABC (mary6543) | 341 comments Well, update. We did do "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" first. Now "The Horse and his Boy". Is it my imagination or is this book rather racist????? I guess the southern country is supposed to be Islamic countries and Narnia is of course wonderful and perfect England. Just sort of disappointed...........


message 12: by ABC (last edited Oct 24, 2012 04:12AM) (new)

ABC (mary6543) | 341 comments On merriamwebster.com, it defines "race" as
a : a family, tribe, people, or nation belonging to the same stock
b : a class or kind of people unified by shared interests, habits, or characteristics

So I do mean race.

And besides....if you read the book, it talks a lot about skin color. The people of Calormen are dark-skinned. Narnians are light-skinned. There is a racist feel to the book.


message 13: by Claire (new)

Claire Caterer | 24 comments Well said, Abigail! You're absolutely right.


message 14: by Claire (new)

Claire Caterer | 24 comments My feeling is that Calormen was fashioned after Lewis's impressions of Arab/Mideastern culture and had little to do with religion. He may even have thought he was being less biased by talking about some positive aspects (storytelling abilities, etc.). But he seemed locked in the biases of his time, which are so starkly evident now.


message 15: by Cheryl, Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 6171 comments Mod
I too was disturbed by the racist feel to the book, and yet 'locked in the biases of his time' is a good phrase to describe what's happening. Fortunately good parents who discuss books with their kids, and offer them other stories with more modern & loving messages, will easily counter messages of bigotry.


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