Worldviews Quotes

Quotes tagged as "worldviews" Showing 1-24 of 24
Jorge Luis Borges
“The library will endure; it is the universe. As for us, everything has not been written; we are not turning into phantoms. We walk the corridors, searching the shelves and rearranging them, looking for lines of meaning amid leagues of cacophony and incoherence, reading the history of the past and our future, collecting our thoughts and collecting the thoughts of others, and every so often glimpsing mirrors, in which we may recognize creatures of the information.”
Jorge Luis Borges, The Library of Babel

Robert Musil
“What is it you do, then? I'll tell you: You leave out whatever doesn't suit you. As the author himself has done before you. Just as you leave things out of your dreams and fantasies. By leaving things out, we bring beauty and excitement into the world. We evidently handle our reality by effecting some sort of compromise with it, an in-between state where the emotions prevent each other from reaching their fullest intensity, graying the colors somewhat. Children who haven't yet reached that point of control are both happier and unhappier than adults who have. And yes, stupid people also leave things out, which is why ignorance is bliss. So I propose, to begin with, that we try to love each other as if we were characters in a novel who have met in the pages of a book. Let's in any case leave off all the fatty tissue that plumps up reality.”
Robert Musil, The Man Without Qualities: Volume I

G.K. Chesterton
“Men invent new ideals because they dare not attempt old ideals. They look forward with enthusiasm, because they are afraid to look back.”
G.K. Chesterton, What's Wrong with the World

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Culture, religion, and education, are conspiracies to standardize worldviews.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana, N for Nigger: Aphorisms for Grown Children and Childish Grown-ups

Christian Smith
“Capitalism is not merely a system for the efficient production and distribution of goods and services; it also incarnates and promotes a particular moral order, an institutionalized normative worldview comprising and fostering particular assumptions, narratives, commitments, beliefs, values, and goals.”
Christian Smith, Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers

Ron Owens
“Many today insist that music is amoral, that there is nothing innately good or bad about music itself. They say it is neutral, and only its use determines whether it is good or evil. To a degree this is true, but in a very real way music ceases to be neutral the moment those little black-and-white notes begin to be woven together to produce a certain combinations of sounds that result in the message or world-view that the composer of the music wants to get across. The music itself becomes a statement, even when words are not attached to its message.”
Ron Owens, Return to Worship: A God-Centered Approach

Justin Taylor
“Quoting Scripture texts is different than shaping a worldview around them.”
Justin Taylor, Sex and the Supremacy of Christ

R. Alan Woods
“My worldview aside from my Christian perspective is more aligned with Plato's thinking, conclusions, and philosophy”
R. Alan Woods, The Journey Is The Destination: A Photo Journal

Steve Cioccolanti
“Why would Westerners interpret victories of war by Sun Tzu as signs of strength and wisdom, but victories of war by Bible believers as signs of barbarism and ignorance? This cognitive dissonance is either a symptom of religious bigotry or a form of "worldview schizophrenia".”
Steve Cioccolanti

Irvin D. Yalom
“I think my quarry is illusion. I war against magic. I believe that, though illusion often cheers and comforts, it ultimately and invariably weakens and constricts the spirit. But there is timing and judgment. Never take away anything if you have nothing better to offer. Beware of stripping a patient who can’t bear the chill of reality. And don’t exhaust yourself by jousting with religious magic: you’re no match for it. The thirst for religion is too strong, its roots too deep, its cultural reinforcement too powerful.”
Irvin D. Yalom, Love's Executioner and Other Tales of Psychotherapy

Bangambiki Habyarimana
“We don't see the world in the same manner”
Bangambiki Habyarimana, Pearls Of Eternity

James C. Dobson
“That’s why we must continue to support godly men and women who have dedicated their lives to Christian principles and to continuing those ideas in our offspring. Professors’ worldviews influence whatever they teach, from humanities to basic sciences, and what they think about God cannot be hidden from their students.”
James C. Dobson, Life on the Edge: The Next Generation's Guide to a Meaningful Future

“Did you know that nine out of 10 Hollywood films lose money?" "Did you know that the vast majority of new television shows are canceled because no one is watching them? Do you wonder why? Because they're mostly awful. Because the people creating them are completely out of touch with the people they are creating them for! Their worldview is vastly different from the worldview of most Americans. We have a largely Christian nation, but Hollywood is largely un-Christian, and in many if not most cases, anti-Christian. They're not just out of touch. They're against you!”
Jody Eldred

Irvin D. Yalom
“I think my quarry is illusion. I war against magic. I believe that, though illusion often cheers and comforts, it ultimately and invariably weakens and constricts the spirit. But there is timing and judgment. Never take away anything if you have nothing better to offer. Beware of stripping a patient who can’t bear the chill of reality. And don’t exhaust yourself by jousting with religious magic: you’re no match for it. The thirst for religion is too strong, its roots too deep, its cultural reinforcement too powerful.”
Irvin D. Yalom, Love's Executioner and Other Tales of Psychotherapy

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“Our outlook on the universe will be different based on the meaning we attach to our relationship with the universe. From Physics perspective, extinction is merely a rearrangement of atoms, even if it happens to millions of humans via nuclear weapons.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

“A professed conservative who believes we can simply turn back the clock to an earlier era and reconstitute the social arrangements proper to that time is misguided. But so also is the progressive who believes that all prior social orders can be judged by the “obviously” more enlightened ones of our own day. 'Political Visions and Illusions'.”
David T Koyzis

David T. Koyzis
“So where does a biblically Christian worldview take us? If, as I have been arguing, the various ideologies are rooted in an idolatrous religion, then what does a nonidolatrous approach to society and politics look like? To begin with, it properly and unquestionably acknowledges the sovereignty of God over the whole of life. Like liberalism, it sees a legitimate place for individual rights and freedoms whilst reminding us that the individual is not sovereign. Like conservatism, it calls us to recognise the proper place of tradition and repudiates those who facilely believe we can do without it. Yet unlike conservatism, it cannot countenance a simple and uncritical deferral to tradition, but recognises that traditions are human formations, subject, like all other human works, to the taint of sin. Like both nationalism and the democratic creed, it recognizes the rightful place of human community, however defined, but rejects all effort at positing such community as an all-encompassing focus of loyalty from which other loyalties, to the extent they are permitted, are merely derivative. Similarly, a nonidolatrous political perspective recognizes the legitimate, though limited, capacity of government to affect economic equity, but it eschews socialist expectations of an eschatological consummation engendered by a salvific working class.”
David T. Koyzis, Political Visions & Illusions: A Survey & Christian Critique of Contemporary Ideologies

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“The theistic concepts of Tawheed, Khilafah and Akhirah govern the Islamic way of life. Belief in the single source of creation defies racial, ethnic or gender basis of biases. According to Islam, all creations belong to Allah. Tawheed also implies interrelatedness of all things in nature due to common status as creatures originating from a single source, i.e. the will of a Supreme Being. Animals and plants are partners to humans in the universe. Simultaneously, the concept of Khilafah raises the stature of human beings as moral beings with an inbuilt and active conscience, which provides the ability to differentiate moral from immoral acts. The concept of Khilafah inculcates the responsibility of custodianship, trusteeship and stewardship in human beings with regards to the use and ownership of physical property and environmental resources. The two worldly view of life in Islam extends the decision horizon of economic agents, be they firms or consumers.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“While the concept of Tawheed creates an equal basis for humans to use what is bestowed in nature, the concept of Khilafah instils stewardship towards the responsible use of natural and environmental resources without pushing planetary boundaries and causing precious loss of biodiversity.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“Environmental stewardship requires that we use natural resources ethically so as to equally improve the welfare of society, other living organisms, and future generations126. In the Islamic worldview, the relationship between humans and nature is one of custodianship or guardianship, and not of dominance. The earth’s resources are available for humanity’s use, but these gifts come from God with certain ethical restraints. We may use the resources to meet our needs, but only in a way that does not upset ecological balance and that does not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“Islamic philosophy of life prioritizes equitable distribution over efficiency. Overreliance on efficiency paralyses the equity and ethical concerns of development policy change. While Islamic principles allow freedom and liberty in lawful consumption within the moral boundaries, they induce affirmative action to promote well-being when people possess the means. In contrast, according to consumer sovereignty, as long as people can put up dollar votes for their preferences, resources will be allocated on producing, marketing and distributing inessential goods even if a quarter of the world population lives in poverty and suffers from hunger, malnourishment and curable diseases.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“Rather than complimenting humans in their animalistic instincts to keep having a one-eyed focus on material well-being only, Islam inculcates piousness, kindness, cooperation and communal responsibility in humans. In some instances, Islam guides explicitly to avoid extravagance, lavishness and using certain products and services which harm a human’s ethical existence and well-being either individually and/or harm the society in the process. Islamic economics incorporates ethical values and excludes from the consumption bundle various goods which bring either private loss or welfare loss to the society.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“Islamic philosophy of life brings a long-term perspective to the pursuit of self-interest by informing humans about the positive and negative consequences of their actions and choices in the life hereafter. In the Godless worldview, due to the absence of afterlife accountability, the rich people with absolute and inviolable property rights can command natural and environmental resources whose potential lifespan is much more than the lives of their owners. But, if the rich people believe in no afterlife accountability, they can extract and exploit these resources quickly and deprive future generations of their use.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World

Salman Ahmed Shaikh
“Climate change is slow, but a cumulative process. Individual human lifespan is only an infinitesimally small fraction of the life of environmental resources and ecosystem services. Hence, the self- centric and this-worldly view of life is incompatible with the concerns of sustainability and socially responsible behaviour. Rather, the dogmatic commitment to self-centric worldview results in the inevitable proliferation of pollution as a right and product to be bought and sold in the market economy. It is ironic, but inevitable to see measures such as ‘statistical value of life’. On the action and policy front in capitalistic democracies, voter ignorance as well as the public-good nature of any results of political activity tends to create a situation in which maximizing an individual’s private surplus through rent seeking can be at the expense of a lower economic surplus for all consumers and producers.”
Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Reflections on the Origins in the Post COVID-19 World