Reservations Quotes

Quotes tagged as "reservations" (showing 1-7 of 7)
Adam Rex
“Captain Smek himself appeared on television for an official speech to humankind.
[...] 'Noble Savages of Earth,' he said. 'Long time we have tried to live together in peace.' (It had been five months.) 'Long time have the Boov suffered under the hostileness and intolerableness of you people. With sad hearts I now concede that Boov and humans will never to exist as one.'
I remember being really excited at this point. Could I possibly be hearing right? Were the Boov about to leave? I was so stupid.
'And so now I generously grant you Human Preserves - gifts of land that will be for humans forever, never to be taken away again, now.'
[...] So that's when we Americans were given Florida. One state for three hundred million people. There were going to be some serious lines for the bathrooms.”
Adam Rex, The True Meaning of Smekday

Sherman Alexie
“It's a weird thing. Reservations were meant to be prisons, you know? Indians were supposed to move onto reservations and die. We were supposed to disappear. But somehow or another, Indians have forgotten the reservations were meant to be death camps.”
Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

Kohta Hirano
“I need just be a bayonet, a bayonet named Diving Punishment. I wish I'd been born a storm. Or a menace. Or a single grenade. No heart, no tears, just as a terrible gale'd have been good. If [by doing this] I become that, then so be it.”
Kohta Hirano

Kohta Hirano
“I wish I had been born a storm. No heart, no tears, just a terrible gale'd been good.”
Kohta Hirano

“People seek reservations expecting country to contribute to their progress, wheres the real prosperity follows when everyone contributes to country’s progress.”
Sandeep Sahajpal

David Treuer
“To understand American Indians is to understand America. This is the story of the paradoxically least and most American place in the twenty-first century. Welcome to the Rez.”
David Treuer, Rez Life: An Indian's Journey Through Reservation Life

Dee Brown
“It is too often the case,” Crook said, “that border newspapers … disseminate all sorts of exaggerations and falsehoods about the Indians, which are copied in papers of high character and wide circulation, in other parts of the country, while the Indians’ side of the case is rarely ever heard. In this way the people at large get false ideas with reference to the matter. Then when the outbreak does come public attention is turned to the Indians, their crimes and atrocities are alone condemned, while the persons whose injustice has driven them to this course escape scot-free and are the loudest in their denunciations. No one knows this fact better than the Indian, therefore he is excusable in seeing no justice in a government which only punishes him, while it allows the white man to plunder him as he pleases.”
Dee Brown, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West