David Treuer

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Influences
This is my chance to claim a lineage (it might be wishful thinking but ...more

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February 2013


David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota. He is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, and fellowships from the NEH, Bush Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation. He divides his time between his home on the Leech Lake Reservation and Minneapolis. He is the author of three novels and a book of criticism. His essays and stories have appeared in Esquire, TriQuarterly, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Lucky Peach, the LA Times, and Slate.com.

Treuer published his first novel, Little, in 1995. He received his PhD in anthropology and published his second novel, The Hiawatha, in 1999. His third novel The Translation of Dr Apelles and a book of criticism, Native American Fiction; A User's Manual
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Travelling to Arizona

Hi Everyone--I'll be reading and talking at ASU this Wednesday from 5-7 in Cochise 228. Here's a link: http://diversity.asu.edu/institutiona...

I'll be talking about the inspiration (and frustration) that led to REZ LIFE (or maybe a better way to say it is that stems from rez life . . . . sometimes).

I hope to see you all (and by all I mean ALL) there!

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Published on February 18, 2013 13:04
Average rating: 3.76 · 3,736 ratings · 672 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
Rez Life: An Indian's Journ...

3.82 avg rating — 1,344 ratings — published 2012 — 8 editions
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The Heartbeat of Wounded Kn...

4.18 avg rating — 956 ratings — published 2019 — 10 editions
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Prudence

3.20 avg rating — 710 ratings — published 2015 — 8 editions
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The Translation of Dr Apell...

3.64 avg rating — 337 ratings — published 2006 — 5 editions
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The Hiawatha

3.72 avg rating — 142 ratings — published 1999 — 6 editions
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Little

3.62 avg rating — 164 ratings — published 1995 — 8 editions
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Native American Fiction: A ...

3.70 avg rating — 79 ratings — published 2006 — 3 editions
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HOKA KEY

4.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2012
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More books by David Treuer…

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How to Get Filthy...
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London Fields
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The Rachel Papers
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David’s Recent Updates

David Treuer has read
Zeno's Conscience by Italo Svevo
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There are all those silly books about mentally unstable people . . . . and there is the supreme model for those books. This is that model. Read. It. (and remember "LC"!!).
David Treuer has read
Swann's Way by Marcel Proust
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This book is one of those perfect books that changes every time you read it. What it means when you're 20 is VERY different than what it means (and says) when you're thirty. Read THIS not . . . . well, THAT.!
David Treuer is currently reading
How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia by Mohsin Hamid
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David Treuer is currently reading
London Fields by Martin Amis
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David Treuer is currently reading
The Rachel Papers by Martin Amis
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David Treuer has read
Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwan
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I love McEwan. I wish the book was better. And of course, I was waiting for t he McEwan switch (He always tilts his novel toward some big reveal and they either work or fail). I wasn't so sure with this one if it was a P or an F . . .
David Treuer has read
Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth
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A classic, of course. and dirty. and classically dirty. But you have to love Roth and how he takes his characters and burrows in and shows the collective insanity we call "life" in motion.
More of David's books…
“That Native American cultures are imperiled is important and not just to Indians. It is important to everyone, or should be. When we lose cultures, we lose American plurality -- the productive and lovely discomfort that true difference brings.”
David Treuer, Rez Life: An Indian's Journey Through Reservation Life

“Watching him then, I simply couldn’t think of him doing anything other than winning. Loss wasn’t the norm, it couldn’t be. I didn’t have the words for it then, what it felt like to watch my cousin, whom I love and whose worries are our worries and whose pain is our pain, manage to be so good at something, to triumph so completely. More than a painful life, more than a culture or a society with the practice and perfection of violence as a virtue and a necessity, more than a meanness or a willingness to sacrifice oneself, what I felt—what I saw—were Indian men and boys doing precisely what we’ve always been taught not to do. I was seeing them plainly, desperately, expertly wanting to be seen for their talents and their hard work, whether they lost or won. That old feeling familiar to so many Indians—that we can’t change anything; can’t change Columbus or Custer, smallpox or massacres; can’t change the Gatling gun or the legislative act; can’t change the loss of our loved ones or the birth of new troubles; can’t change a thing about the shape and texture of our lives—fell away. I think the same could be said for Sam: he might not have been able to change his sister’s fate or his mother’s or even, for a while, his own. But when he stepped in the cage he was doing battle with a disease. The disease was the feeling of powerlessness that takes hold of even the most powerful Indian men. That disease is more potent than most people imagine: that feeling that we’ve lost, that we’ve always lost, that we’ve already lost—our land, our cultures, our communities, ourselves. This disease is the story told about us and the one we so often tell about ourselves. But it’s one we’ve managed to beat again and again—in our insistence on our own existence and our successful struggles to exist in our homelands on our own terms. For some it meant joining the U.S. Army. For others it meant accepting the responsibility to govern and lead. For others still, it meant stepping into a metal cage to beat or be beaten. For my cousin Sam, for three rounds of five minutes he gets to prove that through hard work and natural ability he can determine the outcome of a finite struggle, under the bright, artificial lights that make the firmament at the Northern Lights Casino on the Leech Lake Reservation.”
David Treuer, The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present

“If you want to know America—if you want to see it for what it was and what it is—you need to look at Indian history and at the Indian present. If you do, if we all do, we will see that all the issues posed at the founding of the country have persisted. How do the rights of the many relate to the rights of the few? What is or should be the furthest extent of federal power? How has the relationship between the government and the individual evolved? What are the limits of the executive to execute policy, and to what extent does that matter to us as we go about our daily lives? How do we reconcile the stated ideals of America as a country given to violent acts against communities and individuals? To what degree do we privilege enterprise over people? To what extent does the judiciary shape our understanding of our place as citizens in this country? To what extent should it? What are the limits to the state’s power over the people living within its borders? To ignore the history of Indians in America is to miss how power itself works.”
David Treuer, The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present

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