Page 25 Quotes

Quotes tagged as "page-25" Showing 1-12 of 12
Maggie Stiefvater
“Do you understand? If they die, I die, too.”
Maggie Stiefvater, Blue Lily, Lily Blue

Maggie Stiefvater
“Ronan kept going, his voice louder. “No. Do you hear me, Cabeswater? You promised to keep me safe. Who are we to you? Nothing? If you let him die, that is not keeping me safe. Do you understand? If they die, I die, too.”
Maggie Stiefvater, Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3)

Nicola Yoon
“Words shouldn't be allowed to change meanings. Who decides that the meaning has changed, and when? Is there an in-between time when word means both things. Or a time when the word doesn't mean anything at all?”
Nicola Yoon, The Sun Is Also a Star

Adam Leith Gollner
“The playwright Edward Albee has characterized [the suddenness of the appearance of fruits and flowers in evolutionary history] as 'that heartbreaking second when it all got together: the sugars and the acids and the ultraviolets, and the next thing you knew there were tangerines and string quartets.”
Adam Leith Gollner, The Fruit Hunters: A Story of Nature, Adventure, Commerce and Obsession

Rick Riordan
“He can talk?" "I talk," Tyson admitted. "You are pretty.”
Rick Riordan, The Sea of Monsters

Maggie Stiefvater
“Adam spoke up, voice half-muffled from the mud. “I made a deal with you, Cabeswater. I’m your hands and your eyes. What do you think I’ll see if he dies?”
Maggie Stiefvater, Blue Lily, Lily Blue

“- ... Jamais substime teus inimigos Saber o momento de recuar não é sinal de covardia mas de extrema sabedoria.”
Felipe Santos

“- ... Todo ato tem uma consequência. Uma ação impensada sempre traz uma consequência desastrosa.”
Felipe Santos

Jo Boaler
“When an official report in the UK was commissioned to examine the mathematics needed in the workplace, the investigator found that estimation was the most useful mathematical activity. Yet when children who have experienced traditional math classes are asked to estimate, they are often completely flummoxed and try to work out exact answers, then round them off to look like an estimate. This is because they have not developed a good feel for numbers, which would allow them to estimate instead of calculate, and also because they have learned, wrongly, that mathematics is all about precision, not about making estimates or guesses. Yet both are at the heart of mathematical problem solving.”
Jo Boaler, What's Math Got to Do with It?: Helping Children Learn to Love Their Least Favorite Subject--and Why It's Important for America

Rachel Caine
“He and his mother weren't close and never had been, really. In this, as in so much else in his life, Jess was alone”
Rachel Caine, Ink and Bone

André Aciman
“What never crossed my mind was that someone else who lived under our roof, who played cards with my mother, at breakfast and supper at our table, recited the Hebrew blessing on Fridays for the sheer fun of it, slept in one of our beds, used our towels, shared our friends, watched TV with us on rainy days when we sat in the living room with a blanket around us because it got cold and we felt so snug being all together as we listened to the rain patter against the windows—that someone else in my immediate world might like what I liked, want what I wanted, be who I was. It would never have entered my mind because I was still under the illusion that, barring what I'd read in books, inferred from rumors, and overheard in bawdy talk all over, no one my age had ever wanted to be both man and woman—with men and women. But before he'd stepped out of the cab and walked into our home, it would never have seemed remotely possible that someone so thoroughly okay with himself might want me to share his body as much as I ached to yield mine.”
André Aciman, Call Me By Your Name

André Aciman
“What never crossed my mind was that someone else who lived under our roof, who played cards with my mother, ate breakfast and supper at our table, recited the Hebrew blessing on Fridays for the sheer fun of it, slept in one of our beds, used our towels, shared our friends, watched TV with us on rainy days when we sat in the living room with a blanket around us because it got cold and we felt so snug being all together as we listened to the rain patter against the windows—that someone else in my immediate world might like what I liked, want what I wanted, be who I was. It would never have entered my mind because I was still under the illusion that, barring what I'd read in books, inferred from rumors, and overheard in bawdy talk all over, no one my age had ever wanted to be both man and woman—with men and women. But before he'd stepped out of the cab and walked into our home, it would never have seemed remotely possible that someone so thoroughly okay with himself might want me to share his body as much as I ached to yield mine.”
André Aciman, Call Me By Your Name