Nuclear Proliferation Quotes

Quotes tagged as "nuclear-proliferation" (showing 1-16 of 16)
Amit Ray
“The job of the United Nations is to grow more flowers, more smiles and more beauty on the earth. Once effect is created, cause will follow,”
Amit Ray, Peace on the Earth A Nuclear Weapons Free World

Amit Ray
“It is the duty of United Nations is to make every international border a garden, a place of art and cultural festival.”
Amit Ray, Peace on the Earth A Nuclear Weapons Free World

Amit Ray
“The job of the united nations is to grow more flowers on the earth.”
Amit Ray, Peace on the Earth A Nuclear Weapons Free World

Randy Thornhorn
“Can there be any question that the human is the least harmonious beast in the forest and the creature most toxic to the nest?”
Randy Thornhorn

Amit Ray
“The role of United Nations is not policing but awakening the heart center of the humanity.”
Amit Ray, Peace on the Earth A Nuclear Weapons Free World

Amit Ray
“Among all the methods non-violence is most successful and I strongly believe that only non-violence can set the true mood of peace and harmony among the nuclear nations. Our experiments with non-violence should be more wide, more engaging and more humble.”
Amit Ray, Peace on the Earth A Nuclear Weapons Free World

Amit Ray
“Our first spiritual task is to develop friendship between North Korea and USA. The second spiritual task is to solve the issues of the Jerusalem and the middle east. The third spiritual task is to develop deep respect and trust between the people of all religions. These are all spiritual crisis and those should be solved first by spiritually. Once, they are spiritually solved, political solution will just follow.”
Amit Ray, Peace on the Earth A Nuclear Weapons Free World

Christopher Hitchens
“Rolf Ekeus came round to my apartment one day and showed me the name of the Iraqi diplomat who had visited the little West African country of Niger: a statelet famous only for its production of yellowcake uranium. The name was Wissam Zahawi. He was the brother of my louche gay part-Kurdish friend, the by-now late Mazen. He was also, or had been at the time of his trip to Niger, Saddam Hussein's ambassador to the Vatican. I expressed incomprehension. What was an envoy to the Holy See doing in Niger? Obviously he was not taking a vacation. Rolf then explained two things to me. The first was that Wissam Zahawi had, when Rolf was at the United Nations, been one of Saddam Hussein's chief envoys for discussions on nuclear matters (this at a time when the Iraqis had functioning reactors). The second was that, during the period of sanctions that followed the Kuwait war, no Western European country had full diplomatic relations with Baghdad. TheVatican was the sole exception, so it was sent a very senior Iraqi envoy to act as a listening post. And this man, a specialist in nuclear matters, had made a discreet side trip to Niger. This was to suggest exactly what most right-thinking people were convinced was not the case: namely that British intelligence was on to something when it said that Saddam had not ceased seeking nuclear materials in Africa.

I published a few columns on this, drawing at one point an angry email from Ambassador Zahawi that very satisfyingly blustered and bluffed on what he'd really been up to. I also received—this is what sometimes makes journalism worthwhile—a letter from a BBC correspondent named Gordon Correa who had been writing a book about A.Q. Khan. This was the Pakistani proprietor of the nuclear black market that had supplied fissile material to Libya, North Korea, very probably to Syria, and was open for business with any member of the 'rogue states' club. (Saddam's people, we already knew for sure, had been meeting North Korean missile salesmen in Damascus until just before the invasion, when Kim Jong Il's mercenary bargainers took fright and went home.) It turned out, said the highly interested Mr. Correa, that his man Khan had also been in Niger, and at about the same time that Zahawi had. The likelihood of the senior Iraqi diplomat in Europe and the senior Pakistani nuclear black-marketeer both choosing an off-season holiday in chic little uranium-rich Niger… well, you have to admit that it makes an affecting picture. But you must be ready to credit something as ridiculous as that if your touching belief is that Saddam Hussein was already 'contained,' and that Mr. Bush and Mr. Blair were acting on panic reports, fabricated in turn by self-interested provocateurs.”
Christopher Hitchens, Hitch 22: A Memoir

Amit Ray
“Whether it is an accident, terrorism or irresponsible push of a nuke button, we all know, the result is devastating. How to prevent nuclear explosions on earth? This is the most crucial political, moral, social, technical and spiritual question of our time.”
Amit Ray, Peace on the Earth A Nuclear Weapons Free World

Amit Ray
“Our commitment to next generations is to bring heaven on earth, and not nuclear annihilation. There is still hope, we must act before time slips.”
Amit Ray, Peace on the Earth A Nuclear Weapons Free World

“If the militarily most powerful and least threatened states need nuclear weapons for their security, how can one deny such security to countries that are truly insecure? The present nuclear policy is a recipe for proliferation. It is a policy for disaster.”
Joseph Rotblat

Amit Ray
“Raindrops make rivers and ocean - our deep intention and positive actions will make the world free from nuclear weapons and wars.”
Amit Ray, Peace on the Earth A Nuclear Weapons Free World

Robert Reed
“In Reagan's world, we have to be geared up to fight a foe that could barely feed its own people. And meanwhile, our real troubles have to be mocked. Global warming. Nuclear proliferation. Corrupt governments supported by my tax dollars and everyone's complacency.”
Robert Reed, Clarkesworld Magazine, Issue 108

“When the world is to come to it's final destruction the powerful will always reason of peaceful nuclear programs which in my own words is a shameful chapter to start when the world has already been destroyed.”
Auliq Ice

Amitav Ghosh
“I'd been surprised by the depth of emotion that was invested in that curiously archaic phrase 'great power'. What would it mean, I'd asked myself, to the lives of working journalists, salaried technocrats and so on if India achieved 'great power status'? What were the images evoked by this tag?

Now, walking through this echoing old palace, looking at the pictures in the corridors, this aspiration took on, for the first time, the contours of an imagined reality. This is what the nuclearists wanted: to sign treaties, to be pictured with the world's powerful, to hang portraits on their walls, to become ancestors. On the bomb they had pinned their hopes of bringing it all back.”
Amitav Ghosh, Countdown

Richard L. Currier
“The construction of the nuclear doomsday machine—and its continued maintenance and development since the mid-twentieth century—is surely one of the most astounding acts of collective insanity in the history of the human species.”
Richard L. Currier, Unbound: How Eight Technologies Made Us Human, Transformed Society, and Brought Our World to the Brink