Hermann Hesse Quotes

Quotes tagged as "hermann-hesse" Showing 1-30 of 82
Hermann Hesse
“It may be important to great thinkers to examine the world, to explain and despise it. But I think it is only important to love the world, not to despise it, not for us to hate each other, but to be able to regard the world and ourselves and all beings with love, admiration and respect.”
Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

Hermann Hesse
“Most people...are like a falling leaf that drifts and turns in the air, flutters, and falls to the ground. But a few others are like stars which travel one defined path: no wind reaches them, they have within themselves their guide and path.”
Hermann Hesse

Hermann Hesse
“We who bore the mark might well be considered by the rest of the world as strange, even as insane and dangerous. We had awoken, or were awakening, and we were striving for an ever perfect state of wakefulness, whereas the ambition and quest for happiness of the others consisted of linking their opinions, ideals, and duties, their life and happiness, ever more closely with those of the herd. They, too, strove; they, too showed signs of strength and greatness. But as we saw it, whereas we marked men represented Nature's determination to create something new, individual, and forward-looking, the others lived in the determination to stay the same. For them mankind--which they loved as much as we did--was a fully formed entity that had to be preserved and protected. For us mankind was a distant future toward which we were all journeying, whose aspect no one knew, whose laws weren't written down anywhere.”
Hermann Hesse, Demian: Die Geschichte von Emil Sinclairs Jugend

Hermann Hesse
“For the first time in my life I tasted death, and death tasted bitter, for death is birth, is fear and dread of some terrible renewal.”
Hermann Hesse, Demian: Die Geschichte von Emil Sinclairs Jugend

Hermann Hesse
“An enlightened man had but one duty - to seek the way to himself, to reach inner certainty, to grope his way forward, no matter where it led.”
Hermann Hesse, Demian: Die Geschichte von Emil Sinclairs Jugend

Hermann Hesse
“Teachers dread nothing so much as unusual characteristics in precocious boys during the initial stages of their adolescence. A certain streak of genius makes an ominous impression on them, for there exists a deep gulf between genius and the teaching profession. Anyone with a touch of genius seems to his teachers a freak from the very first. As far as teachers are concerned, they define young geniuses as those who are bad, disrespectful, smoke at fourteen, fall in love at fifteen, can be found at sixteen hanging out in bars, read forbidden books, write scandalous essays, occasionally stare down a teacher in class, are marked in the attendance book as rebels, and are budding candidates for room-arrest. A schoolmaster will prefer to have a couple of dumbheads in his class than a single genius, and if you regard it objectively, he is of course right. His task is not to produce extravagant intellects but good Latinists, arithmeticians and sober decent folk. The question of who suffers more acutely at the other's hands - the teacher at the boy's, or vice versa - who is more of a tyrant, more of a tormentor, and who profanes parts of the other's soul, student or teacher, is something you cannot examine without remembering your own youth in anger and shame. yet that s not what concerns us here. We have the consolation that among true geniuses the wounds almost always heal. As their personalities develop, they create their art in spite of school. Once dead, and enveloped by the comfortable nimbus of remoteness, they are paraded by the schoolmasters before other generations of students as showpieces and noble examples. Thus teh struggle between rule and spirit repeats itself year after year from school to school. The authorities go to infinite pains to nip the few profound or more valuable intellects in the bud. And time and again the ones who are detested by their teachers are frequently punished, the runaways and those expelled, are the ones who afterwards add to society's treasure. But some - and who knows how many? - waste away quiet obstinacy and finally go under.”
Hermann Hesse, Beneath the Wheel

Hermann Hesse
“I realize that some people will not believe that a child of little more than ten years is capable of having such feelings. My story is not intended for them. I am telling it to those who have a better knowledge of man. The adult who has learned to translate a part of his feelings into thoughts notices the absence of these thoughts in a child, and therefore comes to believe that the child lacks these experiences, too. Yet rarely in my life have I felt and suffered as deeply as at that time.”
Hermann Hesse, Demian: Die Geschichte von Emil Sinclairs Jugend

Hermann Hesse
“At one time I had given much thought to why men were so very rarely capable of living for an ideal. Now I saw that many, no, all men were capable of dying for one.”
Hermann Hesse, Demian: Die Geschichte von Emil Sinclairs Jugend

Hermann Hesse
“When a tree is polled, it will sprout new shoots nearer its roots. A soul that is ruined in the bud will frequently return to the springtime of its beginnings and its promise-filled childhood, as though it could discover new hopes there and retie the broken threads of life. The shoots grow rapidly and eagerly, but it is only a sham life that will never be a genuine tree.”
Hermann Hesse, Beneath the Wheel

Hermann Hesse
“Sinclair, your love is attracted to me. Once it begins to attract me, i will come. I will not make a gift of myself, I must be won.”
Hermann Hesse

Hermann Hesse
“Novelists when they write novels tend to take an almost godlike attitude toward their subject, pretending to a total comprehension of the story, a man's life, which they can therefore recount as God Himself might, nothing standing between them and the naked truth, the entire story meaningful in every detail. I am as little able to do this as the novelist is, even though my story is more important to me than any novelist's is to him - for this is my story; it is the story of a man, not of an invented, or possible, or idealized, or otherwise absent figure, but of a unique being of flesh and blood, Yet, what a real living human being is made of seems to be less understood today than at any time before, and men - each one of whom represents a unique and valuable experiment on the part of nature - are therefore shot wholesale nowadays. If we were not something more than unique human beings, if each one of us could really be done away with once and for all by a single bullet, storytelling would lose all purpose. But every man is more than just himself; he also represents the unique, the very special and always significant and remarkable point at which the world's phenomena intersect, only once in this way and never again. That is why every man's story is important, eternal, sacred; that is why every man, as long as he lives and fulfills the will of nature, is wondrous, and worthy of every consideration. In each individual the spirit has become flesh, in each man the creation suffers, within each one a redeemer is nailed to the cross.”
Hermann Hesse, Demian: Die Geschichte von Emil Sinclairs Jugend

Hermann Hesse
“...and gradually his face assumed the expressions which are so often found among rich people - the expressions of discontent, of sickliness, of displeasure, of idleness, of lovelessness. Slowly the soul sickness of the rich crept over him.”
Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

Hermann Hesse
“It is wrong to say that schoolmasters lack heart and are dried-up, soulless pedants! No, by no means. When a child's talent which he has sought to kindle suddenly bursts forth, when the boy puts aside his wooden sword, slingshot, bow-and-arrow and other childish games, when he begins to forge ahead, when the seriousness of the work begins to transform the rough-neck into a delicate, serious and an almost ascetic creature, when his face takes on an intelligent, deeper and more purposeful expression - then a teacher's heart laughs with happiness and pride. It is his duty and responsibility to control the raw energies and desires of his charges and replace them with calmer, more moderate ideals. What would many happy citizens and trustworthy officials have become but unruly, stormy innovators and dreamers of useless dreams, if not for the effort of their schools? In young beings there is something wild, ungovernable, uncultured which first has to be tamed. It is like a dangerous flame that has to be controlled or it will destroy. Natural man is unpredictable, opaque, dangerous, like a torrent cascading out of uncharted mountains. At the start, his soul is a jungle without paths or order. And, like a jungle, it must first be cleared and its growth thwarted. Thus it is the school's task to subdue and control man with force and make him a useful member of society, to kindle those qualities in him whose development will bring him to triumphant completion.”
Hermann Hesse, Beneath the Wheel

Hermann Hesse
“Suchen heißt: ein Ziel haben. Finden aber heißt: frei sein, offen stehen, kein Ziel haben ... Ein Sucher sieht manches nicht, was nah vor seinen Augen steht.”
Hermann Hesse

Hermann Hesse
“And so Gotama wandered into the town to obtain alms, and the two Samanas recognized him only by his complete peacefulness of demeanor, by the stillness of his form, in which there was no seeking, no will, no counterfeit, no effort - only light and peace.”
Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

Hermann Hesse
“Merchant: 'So you have lived on the possessions of others?'
Saddhartha: 'Apparently. The merchant also lives on the possession of others.'
Merchant: 'Well spoken...”
Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

Hermann Hesse
“I don’t write literature but simply confessions, just as a drowning man or a man dying of poisoning no longer worries about the state of his hair or the modulation of his voice, but instead simply lets out a scream.”
Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf

Hermann Hesse
“Man svarbu mokėti mylėti pasaulį, neniekinti jo, nejausti neapykantos jam ir sau, žvelgti į jį, į save ir į visas būtybes su meile, susižavėjimu ir didžia pagarba.”
Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

Hermann Hesse
“Meilę galima iškaulyti, nupirkti, gauti dovanų, atrasti gatvėje, bet jėga jos išplėšti negalima.”
Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

Hermann Hesse
“What you search is not necessarily the same as what you find. When you let go of the searching, you start finding”
Hermann Hesse

“Stepių Vilkas, atkyldęs į mūsų miestus, į kamenės gyvenimą - joks kitas vaizdas taip įtikinamai neparodys, koks šis žmogus baugštus, vienišas, koks laukinis, neramus, kaip pasiilgęs tėvynės ir kaip jam jos trūksta.”
Hesse Herman

“<...> girdi, kaip už langų gyvena pasualis ir žmonės, žino, kad yra nuo jų atsiskyręs, bet nesižudo, nes tikėjimo likutis jam sako, jog turi širdimi iki galo patirti šią kančią, šią baisią kančią ir mirti turi nuo šios kančios.”
Hesse Herman

“<...> kas yra matęs tų pragariškų dienų, tas labai patenkintas tokiomis paprastomis, pusėtinomis dienomis kaip ši diena <...>.”
Hesse Herman

Hermann Hesse
“Puikus dalykas - pasitenkinimas, neskausmingumas, šios pakenčiamos, romios dienos, kai nei skausmas nei džiaugsmas nedrįsta suklykti, kai viskas vien šnabždasi ir sėlina ant pirštų galų.”
Hermann Hesse

Hermann Hesse
“Vienatvė - tai nepriklausomybė, aš jos norėjau ir įsigijau per ilgus metus. Ji buvo šalta, o taip, bet ji buo tyli, nepaprastai tyli ir didelė tarsi šalta nebyli erdvė, kurioje sukasi žvaigždės.”
Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf

Hermann Hesse
“Ir netgi nelaimingiausiam gyvenime pasitaiko saulėtų valandų ir mažyčių laimės gėlių tarp smėlio ir akmenų.”
Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf

Petra Hermans
“Ik heb de steegjes gezien, zou ik kunnen zeggen.”
Petra Hermans

Hermann Hesse
“What we think of as acts of cruelty are in reality nothing of the kind. Someone from the Middle Ages would still find the whole style of our present-day life abhorrent, but cruel, horrifying and barbaric in a quite different way. Every age, every culture, every ethos and tradition has a style of its own, has the varieties of gentleness and harshness, of beauty and cruelty that are appropriate to it. Each age will take certain kinds of suffering for granted, will patiently accept certain wrongs. Human life becomes a real hell of suffering only when two ages, two cultures and religions overlap. Required to live in the Middle Ages, someone from the Graeco-Roman period would have died a wretched death by suffocation, just as a savage inevitably would in the midst our civilisation. Now, there are times when a whole generation gets caught to such an extent between two eras, two styles of life, that nothing comes naturally to it since it has lost all sense of morality, security and innocence. A man of Nietzsche's mettle had to endure our present misery more than a generation in advance. Today, thousands are enduring what he had to suffer alone and without being understood.”
Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf

Hermann Hesse
“Can’t you get into your head, my learned friend, that you’ve taken a liking to me and feel that I matter because I’m a kind of mirror for you, because something in me responds to you and understands you? Actually, all human beings ought to be such mirrors for one another, responding and corresponding to each other in this way, but the thing is that cranks like you are oddities. You easily get lead astray, bewitched into thinking that you can no longer see or read anything in the eyes of other people, that there is nothing there that concerns you any more. And when a crank of your sort suddenly discovers a face again that really looks at him, in which he senses something akin to a response and an affinity, it naturally fills him with joy.”
Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf

Hermann Hesse
“«Piccolo Sinclair, sta’ attento. Io dovrò andarmene. Un giorno avrai forse bisogno di me, di nuovo contro Kromer o altro. Se mi chiamerai, non verrò più così volgarmente a cavallo o col treno. Allora dovrai ascoltare te stesso, e ti accorgerai che dentro ci sarò io. »

...

La medicazione fu dolorosa. Tutto ciò che mi avvenne dopo quel giorno fu doloroso. Ma talvolta, quando trovo la chiave mi sprofondo dentro di me, dove le visioni del destino dormono nello specchio buio, basta che mi chini sopra questo specchio per vedere la mia propria immagine che è in tutto uguale a lui, a lui, mio amico e guida.

Demian, Hermann Hesse”
Hermann Hesse, Demian: Die Geschichte von Emil Sinclairs Jugend

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